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bague25

Pickles

66 posts in this topic

Which are the pickles you have in your pantry right now?

Which are the ones you dream of?

Any recipes? Any secrets? Any reading material?

Please share - as Monica says Inquiring minds want to know...

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Mango and Lime are currently in my pantry.

I love but have a tought time finding the small whole mango pickle from baby mangoes.

my mother turned me on to garlic pickle and penaut butter on bread. it's quite good actually.

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Panchranga Mixed Pickle

Sweet Lime Pickle

Chilli Pickle.

Amba Haldi Pickle

Mango Pickle

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tryska,

I think you're talking about vadu manga? There are some available from Bedekar and Mother's recipe - should be available at any Indian grocery store but if you can;t find it, let me know and I can mail you some. Doesnt taste nearly as good as the ones my mom used to make at home and store for months and years in those huge 'bharanis' or pickle jars.. yumm. But they;re ok and definitely satisfy my cravings for them :smile:

Also

Avakkai

Manga Curry (not the storable variety - only lasts about a week I think)

Mahani Pickle (no idea what the basic ingredient is called in English) - if anyone knows, do let me know so I can see if I can find it someplace locally

Manga Thokku - a cooked and mashed raw mango pickle

Yumm, this thread is making me sooooo hungry :shock:

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i think it was bedekar's we used to get. now it seems everywhere only carries pataks brand. I'll have to check the larger indian stores here in atlanta. i'm sure i'll be able to find it somewhere.

i remeber one time when i was growing up, my mother made an unfortunate attempt at making fish pickle. she didn't pickle ever again after that.

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Hmmm, I've tried making manga thokku, avakkai and manga curry at home quite successfully using the raw mangoes available at the Indian stores. Vadu manga is a tougher nut to crack since the baby mangoes are just not to be found :(. I remember when my parents would go out early in the morning to bring back the years stock of raw baby mangoes and then use up all the fershly scrubbed plastic buckets at home to keep them salted for days on end before embarking on the actual pickle making. The whole house used to smell of raw mangoes at the time .. it was wonderful!

How come no one mentioned prawn balchao. We make Balchao everytime the urge to something reallllyy hot and spicy strikes us. I use about 1/2 the chillies mentioned in my mother-in-laws recipe and its still too hot for most people to bite into :smile: . I find it terribly amusing that my whole family has an almost competitive attitude when it comes to how much heat we can handle in our food :raz:

The pickles I dream about are those awesome tasting chundhas and godkairis that my gujarathi godmother used to make every year. *sigh*

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i think it was bedekar's we used to get. now it seems everywhere only carries pataks brand. I'll have to check the larger indian stores here in atlanta. i'm sure i'll be able to find it somewhere.

i remeber one time when i was growing up, my mother made an unfortunate attempt at making fish pickle. she didn't pickle ever again after that.

tryska,

One good source is www.patelbrothersusa.com. They carry all brands and have Vadu mango pickle from both Priya and Bedekar. I have tried Priya before and it was good.

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have in the house right now-the usual suspects

mixed pickle-priya( bedekar not available when sought)

panchranga(back in a big wayafter many years avoiding it due to unpleasant association with bits of hairy,mustard oil scented kernels flattened onto dusty playgrounds of ones youth)

sri lankan katta sambol

need to replenish

ferns' prawn balchao(yes me too)

want gooseberry pickle-it's been too long..

wake flushed from dreams of mtr gongura and hog plum smiling sardonically at me...

secrets :unsure: secreted packets of bedekars pickle mix for upcoming batch of carrot pickle.

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Mmmmm Gingerly, I wannn carrot pickle too :biggrin:

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want gooseberry pickle-it's been too long..

Hmmm...gooseberry pickles...I am the only one here that eats em, gets tired of gooseberry pie..will have to look up some recipes online..

Usually just lets them fall to the ground for whatever critters will eat them...When we had chickens they would jump to try to get them without getting stuck with the thorns...

Now, all I have to do is find a recipe for something to do with quinces...other than jelly...gonna have a bumper crop this year...

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I have a stuffed red chili pickle that smells like heaven and tastes almost as good. I also have a lime pickle and a green chili pickle. I have yet to actually try them. I yearn for this green mango pickle that I used to get at a restaurant in Chicago. I am not at all well versed in pickles or chutneys so thats an area that I'm trying to experiment with. I'm not ready to make them myself so I'm open to folks suggesting brands and types for me to try. :wub:

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Ohhhh, gooseberry = amla. I didnt know this :). I love gooseberry pickle. FOr some reason, my friends who havent eaten these when they were kids didnt take to it much but I love them :). Are Indian gooseberries available in the US?

-worm@work

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now i thought gooseberry was nellikai, which looks nothing like amla. hmm.

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now i thought gooseberry was nellikai, which looks nothing like amla.  hmm.

I am now completely confused. Amla is "Aamloki" is Bengali, which I *thought* was the same thing as Phyllantus Acidus: http://www.tropilab.com/phyllantus-acidus.html

Isn't Nellikai the same thing?

Isn't gooseberry the same thing?

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i feel like we've had this discussion before. *lol*

the picture on that page looks liek the nellikai tree in my grandmother's front yard, however the berries have ridges like little tiny yellow pumpkins (american pumkins) not smoothish like other people's amla looks. also it's a large trea that bears fruit downward and in clusters like cherries.

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Which are the pickles you have in your pantry right now?

Which are the ones you dream of?

Any recipes? Any secrets? Any reading material?

Please share - as Monica says Inquiring minds want to know...

i dont have a pantry atm...but the usual suspects are: tender mango(vadumangai), mango(avakkai), mango(thokku), lime, magali(obscure..but south indians might recognise this root veggie pickle), salt narthangai(dont have a clue what its called in english..it looks ugly..but its wonderful), gooseberry(nellikai - hot version), 'ma-inji'(havent a clue what it is called in english) and mmmmmmm..garlic pickles

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Hmm ma-inji :).. My dad says its called mango-ginger but I remember that its different from both mango and ginger!! Not sure what exactly the basic vegetable (?) is.. anyone knows? He also told me its called Mamidi Allam (again i think literal translation of mango-ginger) in telugu. I havent had this in a really really long time.

-worm@work

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now i thought gooseberry was nellikai, which looks nothing like amla.  hmm.

I am now completely confused. Amla is "Aamloki" is Bengali, which I *thought* was the same thing as Phyllantus Acidus: http://www.tropilab.com/phyllantus-acidus.html

Isn't Nellikai the same thing?

Isn't gooseberry the same thing?

Phyllanthus emblica and phyllanthus indofischeri are what's generally knowm as amla/nellikai. http:// www.ias.ac.in/currsci/jun252003/1515.pdf (problem posting link).

the other one phyllanthus acidus(and one very like it with fruit along the branches)are less astringent,more succulent-a bit like a carambola.

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Hmm ma-inji :).. My dad says its called mango-ginger but I remember that its different from both mango and ginger!! Not sure what exactly the basic vegetable (?) is.. anyone knows? He also told me its called Mamidi Allam (again i think literal translation of mango-ginger) in telugu. I havent had this in a really really long time

questions answered about 3-4 pages back under fresh turmeric/mango turmeric.

indian gooseberry

oh well, back to the drawing board

i've purchased frozen amla from local groceries. they're very different from oregon gooseberries. :wacko:

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other than the usual suspects, the one i am craving right now

and am unable to get, is the "green peppercorn" pickle, specialty

of kerala.

the regular black peppercorns that you get, when they are growing

on the vine, are green and come in bunches, and make an AWESOME

pickle. i had it while in kerala, and saw one bottle, manufactured

by laxmi pickles, in a friend's house in the us.

have not been able to track it down since then, in india or us.

any kind egulleter who can supply me some .....?

:smile:

milagai

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I love pickles and collect em from all over so here is what I have.

North Indian

Stuffed Red Chilli

Green Chilli mustard

Sweet Lemon

Jackfruit

Mango

Sweet Mango

Mango with Hing

Gujerati

Chundo (grated unripe mango sun cooked with sugar, spiked with chilli powder)

Murabba (chunks of unripe mango cooked with sugar to a golden yellow color, spiced with clove and cinnamon)

Godkairi

Spicy mango

Garlic

Goan

hot sweet spicy tendli pikle

and the same with mix veges

Seasonal pickles that pass thru

Turmeric

Green pepper

mix veg in lemon and split mustard

Milagai we get a green pepper in brine at my local masallawalla. Would that interest you? I can only send it after I get back though (4 July) ... Just pm me.

Rushina

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The essential pickle in my household, one which I get very agitated about if it is not lurking in my fridge at all times, is misqut, from Goa.

It's a spicy, vinegary, piquant preparation, made mostly of small and tender good quality green mangoes. These are first slit and salted and pressed for days under a very heavy weight, then stuffed with a combination of spices including hing and turmeric and chilis and mustard seeds, then submerged in hot oil made fragrant with further spices.

Give it a year or so in the jar (my current stash is from 2000) and the pickle that you end up with is unbeatable with chicken or prawn or fish curry, or most anything else.

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