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Things I love that other people don't get


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Oooh - watch your linguistic step there. If memory serves, the Swedes call it "lutfisk," not "lutefisk," and can get pretty indignant at being confused with those Norwegian scum.

Hmmm - maybe they prepare it differently, too, and that might account for... nah. Nah, you're just weird.

Yup, my mistake misspelling lutfisk. It was good, I'm not saying it's my favorite food ever, though... (it really needs some color/texture interest).

And yep, since you were wondering, I was trying out foods over the course of a few days at Christmas... I unfortunately had to forgo the traditional Swedish meatballs on Xmas eve though (Catholic, so no meat for me on Xmas eve).

I did dig into some shortly after midnight, though :wub:

"Give me 8 hours, 3 people, wine, conversation and natural ingredients and I'll give you one of the best nights in your life. Outside of this forum - there would be no takers."- Wine_Dad, egullet.org

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My Dad liked buttermilk mixed with tomato juice.    :blink:

My Mom drank that as well!

Really! And we turned out just fine...imagine that! :laugh: Actually I remember tasting it and it wasn't bad. Like a tangy, cold tomato soup. My Dad would be in his 80's now if he were still here. I wondered if that was a childhood thing they gave kids? I'd never heard anyone else doing that!

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I love Ramen (mostly by necessity).

I love bottled Daquiri mix

I love instant oatmeal

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

I love pork rinds and hot sauce.

Sometimes, I just eat brown sugar. Straight.

Word.

I have to be very careful in the bulk bin section of Whole Foods. I've caught myself eating raw rolled oats out of my freshly filled bag before. It elicits some strange looks from fellow shoppers. I love them raw, far more than unadorned cooked ones. I will also eat them raw with brown sugar. Yum.

I abhor Dinty Moore Beef Stew, but feel a kinship with you anyway, as I LOVE cold Campbells Vegetable Beef Soup, straight out of the can, still concentrated.

Old El Paso refried beans cold out of the can

I also love ramen, but only the beef or spicy beef flavors.

My husband and I will drink bottled sour mix, no added alcohol, over ice

I love pork rinds, too, but not the real ones like you can get at the fair. I like the cheap air puffed ones.

And this one is so bad that my husband has asked me to never do it or mention it in front of him: I love drinking Worstcheshire (Spelling???) sauce straight from the bottle.

Gourmet Anarchy

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And this one is so bad that my husband has asked me to never do it or mention it in front of him: I love drinking Worstcheshire (Spelling???) sauce straight from the bottle.

Holy shit!

Noise is music. All else is food.

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And this one is so bad that my husband has asked me to never do it or mention it in front of him: I love drinking Worstcheshire (Spelling???) sauce straight from the bottle.

Holy shit!

What Nero said.

And regarding the Campbell's soup thing, I had the misfortune to spend a couple of days in a Red Cross shelter during a hurricane. They served us heated undiluted beef vegetable soup over plain old steamed white rice. Turned out to be darned tasty.

Haven't made it since, but I may have to try it again...

Screw it. It's a Butterball.
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My Dad liked buttermilk mixed with tomato juice.    :blink:

My Mom drank that as well!

Really! And we turned out just fine...imagine that! :laugh: Actually I remember tasting it and it wasn't bad. Like a tangy, cold tomato soup. My Dad would be in his 80's now if he were still here. I wondered if that was a childhood thing they gave kids? I'd never heard anyone else doing that!

Speak for yourself...not sure how "fine" I am :raz: After all, I am somewhat food obsessed now!! Maybe it's all because of that "thousand island dressing" drink? :laugh:

(When I was a kid, mixing ketchup and mayo to make the dressing reminded me of my mom's buttermilk and tomato juice beverage...)

"Well," said Pooh, "what I like best --" and then he had to stop and think. Because although Eating Honey was a very good thing to do, there was a moment just before you began to eat it which was better than when you were, but he didn't know what it was called. - A.A. Milne

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Oh, yeah -- forgot a big one! FRUITCAKE!

Sure, I love the fancy ones with whole-grain flour and artisan-dried organic fruits -- but I also will happily devour the supermarket products loaded with red and green plastic bits and covered with almond-flavoured rubber icing. Ah! Yuletide! Skip the presents, give me that fruitcake you've been hoarding.

With strong Cheddar cheese, lovely . Every Christmas.

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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cilantro.

Me too!! I grow a lot because I use it in a lot of things.

I also grow the Asian Rau Ram which tastes like cilantro but is a perennial and does not "bolt" when the weather is very hot.

It is so easy to grow, I bought some at an Asian market, put in in a jar of water on the window sill and within three or four days there were rootlets at every segment. I broke the stems into segments, planted then and every piece sprouted a new plant. Great stuff.

With the cilantro you mean? or the rau ram? that was the biggest thing - i remember my mom growing cilantro from seed - and well when it grew that was it. we had cilantro for a few weeks. I would love to grow my own, so i can use it on an as needed basis. The bunches at the grocery are too big for me.

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fruitcake...with cheese :unsure: i'm sorry but i was a hapless  'as read in..' food victim as a child.enid blyton did the most damage (cream teas anyone?)this particular one was brought on by james herriot.

cilantro of course.

kinda reminds me of jamaican bun and cheese. which actually is more like a hot cross bun (without the icing, with the citron) with cheese in the middle.

and i didn't realize i was the engine on the cilantro love train.....just as a feeble attempt at derailing, one of my favoritest meals of all is kielbasa (pref hillshire farms) sliced real thin, and sauteed with onions, fresh cilantro, turmeric and chili powder, and then extra fresh cilantro thrown in til it wilts, when the kielbasa starts getting browned and a little crispy on the edges.

(btw -i really prefer the word coriander, but cilantro keeps fallign from my fingers)

so umm..there's my dirtry little secret.

Edited by tryska (log)
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hmm, that sounds pretty good. I could see myself eating that sexed up kielbasa with some steamed rice.

On another note, there's a fruitcake that a friend of mine orders every year from... (Florida?) I never had fruitcake like that before. Good with some hot tea.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.

--NeroW

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With the cilantro you mean? or the rau ram? that was the biggest thing - i remember my mom growing cilantro from seed - and well when it grew that was it. we had cilantro for a few weeks. I would love to grow my own, so i can use it on an as needed basis. The bunches at the grocery are too big for me.

I meant the Rau Ram. I grow a lot of cilantro but in the high desert temps it bolts rapidly and is useless except for saving seed.

The Rau Ram can be grown in a pot indoors over the winter, lives outside fine in high heat (in the shade) and if I need a new plant I just break off a stem, stick it in water and in a couple of days there are rootlets and it can be planted in a pot.

Check this site for information and a picture. Several nurseries carry it in the L.A. area.

Or you can find it fresh at Asian markets and just plop it into a jar of water on a windowsill when you see roots, plant it.

http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/polodoratum.htm

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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With strong Cheddar cheese, lovely . Every Christmas.

we should do tea sometime!

slabs-always slabs.slabs of cake ,slabs of bread,slabs of butter..somebody slabp me..

(btw -i really prefer the word coriander, but cilantro keeps fallign from my fingers)

the same-somehow cilantro conjures up the overgrown,flat leaf parsley lookalike and coriander the feathery,flavourful ( yes !yes!) with some flowers still on them.

the one in front

off to plant some now.

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hmm..andiesenji - rau ram looks much different from coriander - can it really be used the same? i might have to get some garden boxes for my porch and start trying different herbs. (gingerly's gotten me motivated)

jschyun - "sexed up keilbasa" love that phrase!

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  • 2 months later...
  • 3 months later...

But, my absolute favorite semi-processed food in the whole wide world is strawberry jello cake.  White cake mix, a box of strawberry Jello, some frozen (or fresh when they're worth getting) strawberries for the cake and the icing, plus some powdered sugar and butter.  My great-aunt Muriel used to make me one of these cakes every year from the time I was a year old for my birthday, or later on when I'd come home from college or for the holidays. 

My parents can't stand the stuff; my husband loves it.  Aunt Muriel can't bake anymore, but she gave me her recipe, and it's a little taste of my childhood every time I make one.

pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeease give recipe?!

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LOVE Cilantro. Favorite way is the way I was first introduced to it, years ago, on a trip to California. Back then you just didn't see it yet on the East. Not like in California, where every taco bar had a separate condiment of chopped onions and Cilantro, sometimes with a little tomato. But the onions and cilantro together, heaven!

I know a lot of people think it has a soapy smell....not to me, it just adds a whole extra level of taste/smell. The more the better.....

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There's this thing that my Grandmother made during my childhood that I just LOVED and when I inhereted her old hand-crank meat grinder, I carried on the tradition of making ground meat sandiches in my household.

Any leftover roast beef would be ground up along with plenty of celery then add sweet pickle relish, a little lemon juice, salt/pepper and bring it all together with Miracle Whip. I love this stuff but everyone that's tried it (mostly soon to be x-girlfriends) says it's awful. Not sure what came first, the decision that this isn't the girl for me so I gave a fond farewell with a sandwich or they said this guy isn't the one for me once the took a bite of the sandwich. Who cares because either way I come out ahead.

It's still a comfort food for me but my wife who's still around after her first exposure says she'll pass. HOORAY!! More for me!!

Bob

p.s. My current wife? She tried the sandwich AFTER we were married. :biggrin:

My Photography: Bob Worthington Photography

 

My music: Coronado Big Band
 

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Peanut Butter and mayo on toast.

Beets in any form.

Fruitcake - my mom ships me one every year at Christmas and I make it last all year - shaving off wafer thin slices once every couple of weeks.

Processed cheese on my burger please - don't waste the aged cheddar, I prefer processed (but only on a burger or grilled "cheese" sandwich.

''Wine is a beverage to enjoy with your meal, with good conversation, if it's too expensive all you talk about is the wine.'' Bill Bowers - The Captain's Tavern, Miami

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  • 1 year later...

Resurrecting this topic because I've currently got a craving for these... tiny dried anchovies. My five-year-old son loves them too -- eats them like potato chips -- but husband has forbidden me to cook these at home. Even if I quick-fry them outdoors on my barbecue's gas burner, he swears that I'll kill all wildlife within a 1-mile radius of our house with the smell... "Birds will start dropping from the sky!" he says. :blink:

Looks like I'll have to head out for some Korean food if I have any remote hope of getting any dried fish action... or see if my Mom will cook them for me! Sigh.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Resurrecting this topic because I've currently got a craving for these... tiny dried anchovies. 

Mooshmouse: The linked picture seemed to have been removed from the site. Would like to take a look at these dried anchovies otherwise. Chinese variety? Japanese? Others?

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Resurrecting this topic because I've currently got a craving for these... tiny dried anchovies. 

Mooshmouse: The linked picture seemed to have been removed from the site. Would like to take a look at these dried anchovies otherwise. Chinese variety? Japanese? Others?

Hmmm. That's curious. Here's a tiny version of the original photo which happens to be of Korean myolchi. In the Philippines, we call them dilis; if you scroll down to the second image on this page in the Market Manila blog, you'll see another photo of them. When making them at home, Filipinos either oven-crisp them or pan-crisp them. They're usually accompanied by a dipping sauce of garlic-and-chili-infused cane vinegar and eaten with a monumental pile of rice.

Joie Alvaro Kent

"I like rice. Rice is great if you're hungry and want 2,000 of something." ~ Mitch Hedberg

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Husb. leaves the house to go away working for 10 days......tuyu magically jumps out of the airtight tin and into the frying pan. Need at least 8 days for the smell to vanish as he has the nose of a foxhound.

Kids used to love eating those packs of dried Squiddy in Thailand....ditto

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