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Wu Liang Ye


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Interesting post lauderdale75. Haven't gotten around to trying the beef tendons, but I will definetly try them the next time.

Has anyone noticed any difference in quality of the food from their location in Midtown and the one on Lex/30s?

Arley Sasson

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Has anyone noticed any difference in quality of the food from their location in Midtown and the one on Lex/30s?

nope. different wine list though, with the midtown location's being a bit more robust, iirc.

edited to add, and i see that sneakeater agrees, i prefer the lex outpost for some reason.

Edited by tommy (log)
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Having eaten at both numerous times, the 39th and Lex location is considerably better than 48th St., and also cheaper. In fact, I think it's the best Sichuan in Manhattan. (I would have to try Spicy and Tasty again before I extend that city-wide.)

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Speaking of Wu Liang Ye...

I've only eaten at the Rock Ctr branch, but we like ordering off the specials list on the front page of the menu. Smokey fish skins, the pickles (stems of broccoli, with just a bit of sichuan heat), and the razor clams arrayed like a peacock are all very good dishes. Add a bowl of rice and you don't even have to venture off that page.

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  • 4 months later...

There's a likelihood that I may be going to the 48th St. branch for lunch today, as part of a party of two. What should we get? I guess tangerine something is de rigueur, but I sure hope there's more tangerine peel in it than when I had tangerine chicken at the 39th St. branch (see report upthread). Any other suggestions?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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There's a likelihood that I may be going to the 48th St. branch for lunch today, as part of a party of two. What should we get? I guess tangerine something is de rigueur, but I sure hope there's more tangerine peel in it than when I had tangerine chicken at the 39th St. branch (see report upthread). Any other suggestions?

I recently had the tea smoked duck and fresh bacon at that branch. I'd recomend the duck but not the fresh bacon. It was just greasy and flavor less compared to the double cooked pork.

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Thanks, donbert.

It was way too crowded. Next time, I will realize that reservations for lunch are essential.

We ended up going to a Japanese restaurant named Naniwa, which I will report on in its own thread.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Hey Pan - Next time in that area, you might want to try try Aburiya - they're serving a whole different teishoku menu for lunch and I've heard it's really good and cheap - I'm going to FINALLY try it out in the next few days

I don't even know what a teishoku menu is. I'll look forward to your report.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I've found that the quality at Wu Liang Ye seems to vary depending on the time of day, with the dishs tasting better later in the evening for some reason. I always got for the razor clams and there was once a time that the tea smoked duck came de-boned.... amazing.

I recently had the tea smoked duck and fresh bacon at that branch. I'd recomend the duck but not the fresh bacon. It was just greasy and flavor less compared to the double cooked pork.

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Hey Pan - Next time in that area, you might want to try try Aburiya - they're serving a whole different teishoku menu for lunch and I've heard it's really good and cheap - I'm going to FINALLY try it out in the next few days

I don't even know what a teishoku menu is. I'll look forward to your report.

Teishoku is set menu. Usually it's served in honor of the practice of sankaku tabe meaning it's served with equal portions of rice and miso soup. One of the few benefits of working at an office in Japan is that most every restaurant swings their doors open and offers teishoku lunches which are like 1200 yen - $10USD

I'll post in the Aburiya thread after lunch - !

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I've found that the quality at Wu Liang Ye seems to vary depending on the time of day, with the dishs tasting better later in the evening for some reason. I always got for the razor clams and there was once a time that the tea smoked duck came de-boned.... amazing.

I recently had the tea smoked duck and fresh bacon at that branch. I'd recomend the duck but not the fresh bacon. It was just greasy and flavor less compared to the double cooked pork.

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  • 8 months later...

Giving this thread a bump. Any updates on Wu Liang Ye at its various locations? Also, I haven't gotten a good sense from this thread exactly how the plates are ordered. Some posts seem to suggest that the restaurant serves its food "Western-style" - meaning each diner gets a "main course." Other posts suggest that it's a more tradition "Chinese family-style" service, where dishes are brought out on platters and each member of the party helps themselves. Can someone clarify?

I don't suppose the menu is posted anywhere? I Googled the restaurant, but all I found were your run-of-the-mill online directory cites, blogposts, and, well, links to this and other food forums.

Thanks!

“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”

Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

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I don't suppose the menu is posted anywhere?  I Googled the restaurant, but all I found were your run-of-the-mill online directory cites, blogposts, and, well, links to this and other food forums.

Thanks!

Here are the menus for all 3 locations.

The human mouth is called a pie hole. The human being is called a couch potato... They drive the food, they wear the food... That keeps the food hot, that keeps the food cold. That is the altar where they worship the food, that's what they eat when they've eaten too much food, that gets rid of the guilt triggered by eating more food. Food, food, food... Over the Hedge
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Some posts seem to suggest that the restaurant serves its food "Western-style" - meaning each diner gets a "main course."  Other posts suggest that it's a more tradition "Chinese family-style" service, where dishes are brought out on platters and each member of the party helps themselves.  Can someone clarify?

It's just a normal Chinese restaurant. You order a bunch of dishes and they plop them in the middle of the table.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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