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Recipes from Argentina

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Would anyone like to contribute recipes of typical Argentine dishes for a new food and wine events website? We have launched a website called

www.cellartastings.com

which is an online gourmet calendar of events worldwide.

We are creating new sections for food by country and would love if we could include recipes for Argentina. Email gen@cellartastings.com if you would like to contribute your recipes for Argentine food, thanks!

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:wink:

Been in Buenos Aires three months, but have yet to discover if there is anything to the cuisine here.

I am curious to find out, so I'll look in once in a while, and see if anyone replies!

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Would anyone like to contribute recipes of typical Argentine dishes for a new food and wine events website? We have launched a website called

www.cellartastings.com

which is an online gourmet calendar of events worldwide.

We are creating new sections for food by country and would love if we could include recipes for Argentina. Email gen@cellartastings.com if you would like to contribute your recipes for Argentine food, thanks!

Grilled Provolone:

http://www.dvo.com/recipe_pages/grilln/Gri...lone_Asado.html

Unique to the area, amazing.

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I am searching for a killer chimichurri recipe. Anyone willing and able?

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I am searching for a killer chimichurri recipe. Anyone willing and able?

Here's a fairly common recipe:

Mix olive oil, wine vinegar and hot water.

Add minced red pepper and oregano.

mince some garlic, add coarse salt and mash together. let it sit for a bit and mix with the other ingredients.

add mustard powder to taste.

and here's the secret ingredient which will make it a killer chimicurri: add some minced/chopped almonds.

Also, it's key to let the chimichurri sit in the refrigerator for a while for all the flavors to develop, infuse and mix.

SD

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Wow! That's amazing. No parsley or cilantro. I am making a third version right now with parsley and cilantro with garlic and jalapeno, oil, vinegar.

I guess you are asking me to wing it with the quantities????

And final question, is this recipe common to you or Argentina? I'm intrigued.

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Wow! That's amazing. No parsley or cilantro. I am making a third version right now with parsley and cilantro with garlic and jalapeno, oil, vinegar.

I guess you are asking me to wing it with the quantities????

lessee. Parsley maybe, but cilantro is a no-no for sure, since the herb is practically unknown in traditional argie food, and has only been introduced lately by other latin american cuisines. Sames goes for jalapeño. Garlic? sure, go for it, or you can even mix in a bit of onion. So I'll give you parsley, garlic and onion as optionals, but you have to have oregano for sure. Also note that the herbs are actually used dried, ie as spices, but I guess you can go fresh as well.

And final question, is this recipe common to you or Argentina? I'm intrigued.

I am argie, and that's how we used to usually make it at home.

SD

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Soooo, what do you think the quantities would be then??

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Soooo, what do you think the quantities would be then??

hmmm well, a little bit of this and a little bit of that, as my grandma would say...

start with these quantities, which I'm making up off the top of my head, and adjust as necessary:

Mix olive oil (let's say 1 cup), wine vinegar (less than one cup... maybe 1/2 a cup) and hot water (not much, 3/4 tbsp ?).

Add minced red pepper (1/2 cup) and dry oregano (2 tbsp).

mince some garlic (1), add coarse salt (2 tsp) and mash together. let it sit for a bit and mix with the other ingredients.

add mustard powder to taste.

or next time I cook some meat (which might not be right away... I live in Spain now) I'll make some and note the quantities...

SD

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Wow! That's amazing. No parsley or cilantro. I am making a third version right now with parsley and cilantro with garlic and jalapeno, oil, vinegar.

I guess you are asking me to wing it with the quantities????

And final question, is this recipe common to you or Argentina? I'm intrigued.

It's not. Almonds is a refinement that you won't usuallly find. Also, Argentines don't do cilantro; it's Italian parsley.

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Wow! That's amazing. No parsley or cilantro. I am making a third version right now with parsley and cilantro with garlic and jalapeno, oil, vinegar.

I guess you are asking me to wing it with the quantities????

And final question, is this recipe common to you or Argentina? I'm intrigued.

It's not. Almonds is a refinement that you won't usuallly find. Also, Argentines don't do cilantro; it's Italian parsley.

As I've said, cilantro is practically unknown in traditional Argie food.

Chimichurri recipes usually call for oregano instead of parsley.

and you're correct, the almonds is not a traditional thing, but do try it and let me know :biggrin:, it makes a killer chimichurri!

SD

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Well, I am back in Buenos Aires, after one year.

Interesting to read about chimichurri. But actually it's just a plain old sauce called salmoriglio in Italian.

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Interesting to read about chimichurri. But actually it's just a plain old sauce called salmoriglio in Italian.

I am curious, is this a stated fact, or a similarity you personally found between the two sauces?

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I'll contribute my chimichurri recipe, why not?

1/2 cup oil

1 cup warm water

1/2 cup vinegar

1/2 cup wine (red if i'm using it on meat, white if on fish or veggies)

1 teaspoon salt

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped

1 scallion, chopped

1 small tomato, peeled, seeded, and chopped

1 small sweet pepper, finely chopped

1 teaspoon paprika

1/2 teaspoon cumin

1/2 teaspoon ground pepper (or chili powder if you want spicy)

1/2 teaspoon oregano leaves (use marjoram if you're going to use this on fish or vegetables)

2 bay leaves

Basically, mix all the ingredients together and let it steep for at least 12 hours before using, shaking it up every couple of hours. It should be used within a couple of days as the freshness of the flavors will fade quickly.


Edited by saltshaker (log)

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