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bleudauvergne

The Montignac Method

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Bleu, please have mercy. I had to join a 12-step food porn recovery program after that week with your foodblog, and now you've got your camera out again....

Seriously, this is a very interesting thread. Thanks.


Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

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What I prepared for the party:

A platter surrounded by shrimp, which had been peeled and deveined (the best I could), but their heads left on for decorum, and in the center a mountain of quartered stuffed artichoke hearts, speared by little skewers, with green olives scattered around it. It was a huge success. I gravely lament not having taken a photo of of it, because i can postitively say it was beautiful. I also did one of those classic quick throw together spinach dip in hollowed out bread bowl.

What happened was that a friend called me that afternoon. She had planned to come over on Saturday and we'd planned to do the profiteroles together. She had been to a neighborhood block party and somehow a group from the crowd had continued to her house to continue the party, and they had ended up with a house full of guests the next morning. So I immediately told her to go back to bed, and not even think about coming over, and to drag her tired self over for dinner before we went to the martini party. Appropriately, I made cold cucumber soup, and quickly without taking any pictures, at the same time worked on the artichoke hearts.

I then had a hair appointment which took longer than I expected. Loic's mother called while I was peeling the shrimp, and I put her on the speaker while peeling the shimp and talking to her. Not using the speaker often, I didn't hang it up correctly. My friends arrived as expected for dinner and I had just put the artichokes in the oven. She came in and said - we've been trying to call you but you're phone's been busy for hours, we invited another person to come for dinner. At the same time he rang the bell, and in addition to feeding the guests, and thinking about how this person must think we are slobs due to the house looking like a hurricaine hit it, I was preparing the platter, and served them some wine, and then the artichokes came out, and decided to serve some to them.

IMG_0665.JPG OFF LIMITS.

IMG_0668.JPG

IMG_0675.JPGartichoke sighting

Dinner was eaten informally around the coffee table, amid the bustle of preparing to leave. It was the cold cucumber soup, and the little plates with artichoke hearts, and clairette de die, a sparkling wine. I poured myself a glass of the wine but did not drink it. No one noticed. :smile:

When we arrived to the party, it started with some activity sportif. They live on the 6th floor and there is no elevator in the building. Beautiful fabulous building and architecture. Unfortunately, in the scuffle to get to the party, the camera was left behind. I should have gone back to get it the minute I realized it, because we live one block away. But we were in a hurry, because we had received an urgent call rather early from the host asking us to come immediately and bring some fruit juice for three largely pregnant women who were asking for it. I was thinking, poor dears, they forgot to get non-acoholic beverages, and they're too busy to go and get some, but once I'd done the stairs I understood their hesistation to pop down to the corner store. And I didn't take any pictures of the platter! :angry:

On arrival, laden with platters, food, baskets, juice, booze, cocktail glasses and shakers, etc. we were warmly welcomed by the people who were already there.

The host then ceremoniously mixed me a special martini, since we had discussed this at great length in the week leading up to the party. I was obligated to drink it. I did not seek to replenish my glass, but twice more during the evening it was replenished. I then thought to fill it with tomato juice. At the end of the evening there was then some spiced vodka from Poland making the round of the kitchen, and I was curious about it. Needless to say, I didn't get rid of any of the drinks put in my hand. :shock:

So this morning I am faced with damage control. I have not gained any weight from this terrible digression, on this day, the one week anniversary of my undertaking this endeavor. So what should I do?

IMG_0676.JPGOrange juice and water.

Definitely not eat any fatty food, that's for sure. Today will remain a 0% fat day, but surely, we will eat.


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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IMG_0678.JPG

Ondilege 0% fromage frais and strawberry compote maison.

WRONG: I was going to cut fat out of my diet today following the reasoning that alcohol breaks down into simple sugars in the bloodstream. However, my husband pointed out that it's highly unlikely that any of that sugar is leftover in my bloodstream. If Montignac allows you to have carb meals and fat meals in the same day, how is it that I would have sugar leftover in my bloodstream for something I consumed last night?


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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Lunch was rather low fat anyway since we did not discuss my twisted logic about alcohol and eating the next day until we were at the table, and I was complaining about all the time I took to remove the fat from the stock...

I strained the chicken stock and had it going in a soup pot. I began taking things out and throwing things into the soup, and then realized - damn I forgot to degrease it. It had a nice thick layer on top because I used the whole chicken to make the soup. Eek! I strained the soup yet again.

I degreased the stock: by putting a plastic freezer bag into a large measuring cup, pouring a liter of soup into the bag, letting it sit for about 10 minutes to let the grease float to the top, and then cutting a corner in the bag from the bottom and letting the degreased soup run into the cup, stopping it before the fat reaches the hole. It was completely degreased. beautiful.

I then stupidly tossed the veggies, which had been completely coated in chicken soup grease, back into the soup :wacko:

At that point I just gave in and served lunch.

IMG_0680.JPGThe soup

consisted of chicken stock with peas and lentils, and pinches from the bouquet.

The bouquet:

There are plenty of flowers for sale at the market on any given day, and I love them. However, instead of getting a bouquet of flowers, I get a bouquet of herbs, and keep them at room temp in the kitchen - no problem. Give each bunch a quick rinse and put them in a pitcher of water. If I change the water daily, they last about a week.

In this country it is customary to give a gift if you go for dinner. Many people bring flowers. I was thinking the other day that giving a generous bouquet of herbs would be about the same price as a bouquet of flowers, and I think that's what I might do next time we go to a friend's house for dinner.

IMG_0693.JPG

At lunch, we put the bouquet on the dining table and each pinched off herbs to add to our soup. We both agreed that the chives were a great addition to the soup. I noted that by pinching the chives, their oils were released, giving the soup a really wonderful flavor. I asked my husband if he thought that it gave more flavor that way, rather than cutting. He said "that's the way it's done".

What? What the heck? Feeling rather feisty, I challenged him - how do you know "that's the way it's done"? According to what authority? He responded that maybe it's not done that way everywhere, but whenever his grandmother made a chive omlette, she would pinch the chives into it instead of chopping it up or snipping it with the scissors, even though she had a chopping board and scissors. Hmmm. OK. I concede. If that's the way it's done in Loic's grandmother's kitchen, then that's the way it's done.

On a second bowl of soup, I tried thyme blossoms, and that was incredible. It's really interesting how an herb can bring out the flavors of things. The thyme blossoms took the green peas and put them on a pedestal. :smile:

IMG_0694.JPG

I think that one important aspect of following any regime is to make sure to maximize the flavor experiences. The main thing that always turned me off of doing any kind of plan in the first place was the prospect of having to eat the same things over and over again. This plan is really pretty good in that respect.

Something I've noticed this week is that I am feeling my sense of taste is definitely becoming more sensitive, or at least I am taking more pleausure in my eating experiences, I can't decide which. Maybe it's the foods I'm not eating, maybe it's something chemical in my body. I don't know.


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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What a pleasure it must be to diet in France.This thought occurred to me when I saw bleu's picture of the jar of goose fat and her display of fresh foods in her kitchen.

This got me to thinking about the differences between dieting in Europe and dieting in the USA. I just started a personalized version of the South Beach diet, mostly because my husband and I want to lose 25 pounds by Thanksgiving. Luckily I have a wonderful source for fresh foods: I work at Central Market in Austin, Texas ( see nessa's blog for photos ), so fresh foods are not a problem for me. But for people in the USA with no place to shop other than Krogers or Safeway: the choices are much reduced. You are forced to eat the same thing day after day.... no wonder people resort to prepared diet foods.

This morning I made omelets for us: one egg plus one eggwhite each. I sauteed fresh zucchini, onion and mushrooms first. When the omelets were nearly cooked, I added some smoked salmon and a sprinkling of freshly grated parmesan.

Sure does beat eating an Atkins bar....

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Foodie52, I agree that bleudauvergne's pictures are gorgeous, and there are any numbers of reasons why I envy her living in France. But I think your France/U.S. comparison is about 20 years out of date. The ingredients for the lovely omelet you describe -- fresh zukes, mushrooms, onion, smoked salmon, parmesan, and eggs -- are available at supermarkets across the U.S., often alongside much more esoteric items. True, I live in New York, but there are three shops within easy walking distance where I could pick up a container of goose fat.

Yes, there are far too many poverty-stricken parts of the country where residents don't have access to supermarkets, but those folks typically aren't buying Atkins bars -- those things cost a fortune and are hardly an economical solution to hunger pangs. And it's also true that my local butcher is not as likely as bleudauvergne's to provide a trimmed tete de veau at a moment's notice. On the other hand, my local market -- and CERTAINLY your local market -- probably has a much wider selection of chiles than is available at the typical French store.

With all due respect, your post strikes me as rooted in the somewhat knee-jerk assumption that the French food-world is always and in all ways superior to the U.S., and I don't think that's necessarily true. The French food-CULTURE may be superior, in that it's really only within the past 30 years or so that Americans, en masse, have started caring passionately about what they eat, whereas the French have had centuries of practice. But in true capitalist tradition, U.S. food producers and retailers have stepped up to the plate in response to that new-found passion, and I suspect that a head-to-head comparison of a typical American supermarket and a typical French marche would be much less of a slam-dunk than you suggest.

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Those artichoke hearts look amazing. With artichokes being cheaper than water right now, I might have to try that out...

On your comment about alcohol digestion, where did you get this information? In my research I have found a slight, but important, distinction. Alcohol does not metabolize in the way normal food or simple sugars would. When alcohol is present in your system your body simply puts traditional metabolism on hold until the alcohol has been processed, but it is processed directly as fuel, no transition to glucose or associated blood sugar spikes. However, due to your body no longer processing those fats and simple sugars while the alcohol is present those things tend to be stored as fat sooner.

I have to say I have noticed that same increase in taste awareness as you have. I believe it has something to do with the elimination of many simple sugars from one's diet. When we stop clobbering our tastebuds with icky sweet all the time they start to really lock in and fine tune to the more subtle flavors in herbs and savory dishes. Maybe that is why Jinmyo seems to have a sixth sense about flavor combinations ;).


He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

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Hey! Sam keeps a bouquet of herbs on the table as well! It's so pretty.

I suspect the reason you're noticing the taste of food more has to do with the way you're thinking about it and its preparation...obviously, from your blog, you are someone who always pays attention to what you're eating, but now you're really IMMERSED in the ingredients and the preparation, from necessity.

This is a fabulous blog.

K


Basil endive parmesan shrimp live

Lobster hamster worchester muenster

Caviar radicchio snow pea scampi

Roquefort meat squirt blue beef red alert

Pork hocs side flank cantaloupe sheep shanks

Provolone flatbread goat's head soup

Gruyere cheese angelhair please

And a vichyssoise and a cabbage and a crawfish claws.

--"Johnny Saucep'n," by Moxy Früvous

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Hi Foodie52. I think that following any kind of diet, as a type Eg, would be followed with the same kind of gusto, I bet every member of eGullet can source just about anything they set their minds to. :smile: There are a lot of people in this country who don't take advantage of what's available to them, really. I think that if I were in the States again, I'd be all over the variety of ethnicities that contribute to what's available. :smile:

Hey that's a great idea, an omlette using one egg plus one white. I have also heard about the South beach diet, from my brother who says he weighs what he did in high school thanks to this diet. Can you summarize the main theories on this diet?

Although fats aren't monitored or measured in the Montignac Plan, we are encouraged to "be reasonable" and consider reducing servings if we reach a plateau and are eating large amounts of anything. I suspect I will eventually be cutting down on my cheese intake, although for the moment things seem to be working well.


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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Part of taking pleasure in eating is in the purchasing. I'm much more inclined to buy fresh, alluring produce from, say, a farmer's market than from my supermarket. Beautiful displays of raw ingredients are a draw. I think bleu shops mostly at small markets? How many Americans ( not living in a great metropolis ) have that opportunity any more? I'd love to know how many small towns have outdoor markets still.

Bleu: what struck me about your diet is its similarity to the South Beach. Only, in phase 1, no bread, very few carbs. No favorite fruits: too much sugar. So we are eating lots of salmon, green veggies, hard cheeses ( parmesan mostly).I'm crazy about bread too, which is why I had to smile when I saw your post about craving bread. It is reintroduced after two weeks, though, along with some wine ( hurray!!)

I have not been able to give up my morning cup of real tea. I draw the line at that! So I admire you for giving up your coffee: you are a stronger woman than I am!


Edited by foodie52 (log)

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On the other hand, my local market -- and CERTAINLY your local market -- probably has a much wider selection of chiles than is available at the typical French store.

Mags, you are so right. Year round we have about 2 varieties, bell and a long hot one. In the summer, sometimes the Africa man has a few little hot ones. Otherwise, I have to take a trip to Chinatown, which usually has something interesting. It's a pepper barren land here. :wacko: And if we didn't have the huge North Africa population in this country, the horizon would be even more sparse.

Edit to say that the hypermarches do import a good variety of produce. But their inconvenience and unpleasantness when we have time to go outweigh all reasons to go (always long long lines, very crowded, actual cart traffic jams and situations of near gridlock in the asiles, poor organization, constantly having things out of stock, etc). We choose to do most of our food shopping at smaller shops near our home.


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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yum yum! WHat's salade de museau?

Salade de Museau is a local specialty that is made from beef. It has pickles and has been marinated in a vinaigrette. :smile:

Made from beef, of course, :smile: but that's like the English menu I saw in Spain where tripe was translated as a kind of Spanish pork meat. Museau is muzzle, or snout.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I suspect the reason you're noticing the taste of food more has to do with the way you're thinking about it and its preparation...obviously, from your blog, you are someone who always pays attention to what you're eating, but now you're really IMMERSED in the ingredients and the preparation, from necessity.

Kathleen, I'm pretty sure you're right! :biggrin:

On your comment about alcohol digestion, where did you get this information?  In my research I have found a slight, but important, distinction.  Alcohol does not metabolize in the way normal food or simple sugars would.  When alcohol is present in your system your body simply puts traditional metabolism on hold until the alcohol has been processed, but it is processed directly as fuel, no transition to glucose or associated blood sugar spikes.  However, due to your body no longer processing those fats and simple sugars while the alcohol is present those things tend to be stored as fat sooner.

Hi NulloMondo. I can't say where I heard it or read it. Montignac doesn't say it. I will have to think about it. :smile:

EDIT: Thank you for bringing this up because I have now read this section more carefully!

OK. Here’s what Montignac says about alcohol. He says a lot so I am going to try and summarize it for you. I have no idea where this concept that alcohol makes sugar comes from, I think my husband said it. When asked where he heard this, he isn't sure.

Alcohol can contribute to weight gain if it is consumed in excessive quantities. But consumed in small quantities, it’s harmless. Even during Stage I you can drink it, however you must limit yourself to 10cl, and wait until the end of the meal to drink it. The point he drives home repeatedly is that it must not be consumed on an empty stomach.

He does mention that consumed alone, it creates an “apport energetique”, (which could be interpreted as caloric, or there is some quality about it that makes it give energy), that the body uses first, which can result in the body using less of its fat stores. That can block us from losing weight. However, this result only occurs when it is consumed on an empty stomach. Once the stomach has already been filled, and particularly with protein rich foods like meat, fish or cheese, the alcohol is absorbed much more slowly and has very little effect on the digestion, thus your being able to drink it after a meal.

It’s the aperetif that causes problems. He says if you must take an aperetif, try and take wine, and only have it after you have had at least 3 or 4 bites of something like olives, cheese, etc. in order for your stomach to close the “pylore”, which is the sphincter between the stomach and the intestine.

Digestifs like cognac and armagnac are discouraged. He gives no reason. But he does say that once you get started with the diet you won’t need any help digesting. (I have found that to be true.)

He writes a bit more about wine, and how it’s actually good for you, and that once you get to Stage II of the plan you can consume up to three glasses of wine a day without it causing weight gain.

He continues, in his discussion of wine, to say that some experts say that wine in small quantities actually has a desirable effect on insulin secretion. If you are able to limit yourself to one small glass at the end of the meal, your slimming process in fact, will become even more effective by drinking it.

He then goes on to describe a way he has come up with for looking like you are drinking during family get-togethers but not actually consuming your glass of wine until the end of the meal.

IMG_0705.JPG10 cl of wine.

(we didn't have any red open, just the clairette which should be consumed before it loses its bubbles.)


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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yum yum! WHat's salade de museau?

Salade de Museau is a local specialty that is made from beef. It has pickles and has been marinated in a vinaigrette. :smile:

Made from beef, of course, :smile: but that's like the English menu I saw in Spain where tripe was translated as a kind of Spanish pork meat. Museau is muzzle, or snout.

Oh alright, Bux. I'll admit it. I've been eating cow muzzle again. :laugh::laugh::laugh: Blame it on the butcher.

But seriously, when I refer to tete de veau I don't say calf head. I say "tete de veau" because it just seems more appetizing that way.

Salad de museau. I could say cow nose salad. Hm. I'll stick with cow nose salad. Not.

I'm so sorry mags. I just couldn't bring myself to announce that I'd been eating the pickings of a braised cow nose for lunch, I apologise for whitewashing it that way, I'll give all the gory details in the future.

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But seriously, when I refer to tete de veau I don't say calf head. I say "tete de veau" because it just seems more appetizing that way.

Salad de museau. I could say cow nose salad. Hm. I'll stick with cow nose salad. Not.

I agree, tête de veau and salad de museau are best left in the original French. It's just that made from beef seems just a bit less than full disclosure. On the whole, I'd suggest most Americans not ask for a translation until they've had the dish. :raz:


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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I snagged the following off the net, in reference to steak tartare. Did you know you were killingly chic?

"In my opinion, this is much tastier than the tête de veau that has been all the rage these last few months in the Parisian bistros."

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Last night was a very small slightly heavy meal consumed very casually of hummous maison, made with less oil than I usually use, some really wonderful picholine olives, and nuts, followed by 10cl of wine.

IMG_0701.JPG

This morning, we got off to a late start due to the alarm not going off. So breakfast was on the run, a fresh crispy apple. It's the first time since I have begun this that I have not had a rather large breakfast. :huh:

Lunch was in the cafeteria: 2 small sardines, about 100 grams of pork tenderloin, a serving of ratatouille, and half of a plain yougert. I realized halfway through that I wasn't hungry anymore so I just left the other half.

Tonight, in light of the most wonderful news that we are allowed to have wine, I am going to go see my friend Mr. Langlet and ask him to help me choose a nice bourdeaux or burgundy to enjoy at the end of my dinner. Since we will probably only drink about one bottle per 4 or 5 days, I plan to get something really good. If anyone has suggestions of wines and years they know and love, please let me know.


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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When consuming a bottle over several days, how do you store the bottle? Do you use a vacuum stopper? In or out of the refrigerator?

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Hi Rachel, If the cork that came out of the bottle does not fit back in, we use air tight stoppers to keep the wine. We don't use stopper that pumps the air out, although one of those would be very cool to have. Normally we put the wine in the fridge when we're keeping it for a few days, although I'm not sure if that's absolutely necessary. We take it out with the cheese plate a couple of hours before dinner.

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I have been unable to get the fish soup out of my head. So I picked up all the necessary ingredients and will make it for dinner tonight. You even have me buying bread made with whole grains.


"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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I have been unable to get the fish soup out of my head.  So I picked up all the necessary ingredients and will make it for dinner tonight.  You even have me buying bread made with whole grains.

Hey, that's great! Please let me know what you thought of it. :smile:

Today has really been a test for me. I have been feeling like something that the cat dragged in. I am utterly exhausted. I can't say why, really. I also had a bad craving for something sweet. But I didn't give in. I think it's because I didn't get my bread this morning.

Long story short, I did not go to the caviste.

Lolo's sister came over and we went out to have a seat on the place de Terreaux, which was full of the most interesting people. Loic had beer, his sister had a Monaco, which is beer with grenadine syrup in it :unsure:, and I had a Perrier, like the other elegant ladies. :wink: (actually I have a long long way to go... :sad: )

IMG_0702.JPG

We sat there staring at people for at least 1.5 hours and I was getting more and more tired by the minute. So when we finally got home, we had a pick me up of some almonds and I nibbled on a small piece of cheese.

IMG_0712.JPG

Tonight was a celebration of the basil and the tomatoes, which were both very good, and the first basil I've enjoyed this season. Drizzled with a little bit of the finest evoo in the house, some fleur de sel, and ground black pepper, and they hit the spot.

IMG_0710.JPG

That was followed by a very small serving (like a tablespoon) of yesterday's hummous, always better on the second day, and then Loic opened a bottle of wine that it turns out Nicolas Langlet had recommended afterall, a remarkably good local wine, a Cote du Rhone with a deceptively simple label, the winery's name is K.

IMG_0729.JPG

IMG_0732.JPG

Dr. Montignac suggests one way of eating your cheese without bread: on a lettuce leaf and I tried that tonight. However I prefer it plain.


Edited by bleudauvergne (log)

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a Cote du Rhone with a deceptively simple label, the winery's name is K.

Dr. Montignac suggests one way of eating your cheese without bread: on a lettuce leaf and I tried that tonight. However I prefer it plain.

What a decidedly unFrench and New World looking label. In a way, it's more shocking than screwcaps or Starbucks in Paris. :biggrin: This reminds me that I've heard from my friends in the lower Languedoc that a local winemaker of some repute and talent has been experimenting with zinfandel grapes. I should note that he's doing this legally with permission of the government. Anyway, he's apparently bottled his first vintage of the Zinfandel and call's it "Z." I'm told it's not quite as rich as better American Zin's but a very drinkable wine and fairly priced at 13 euros. The winery is Arjolle.

On the whole, I think I prefer my cheeses neat, eaten with a fork and knife.


Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

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What I love is fruit with my cheese -- a crisp apple or pear. If that's a verboten combination on the diet, I have a bizarre thought: Jicama. 100 grams has only about 4 grams of carbohydrate (after subtracting fiber), and it has both the crunch and some of the juicy sweetness of an apple. It might be found under the name yam bean. Unfortunately, I don't have a glycemic count on it.

Good luck with it all! You seem to be doing terrifically well.

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Hang in there, Lucy!

Perrier is an elegant ladies' drink? I tend to think of it as being a fairly ordinary and inexpensive carbonated drink in France, not shi-shi like in the U.S., where many people think anything French (including Evian water) must ipso facto be classy. But I guess I was wrong. :laugh:


Michael aka "Pan

 

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      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
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