Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Enzian

Homemade Mayonnaise: Technique, Troubleshooting, Storage

Recommended Posts

I have tried several other oils for making mayonnaise - with various "additives" - such as garlic.

"Regular" that is NOT EVOO olive oil is my choice for aioli because too many of the latter have a much too "grassy" or "herbal" flavor that does not work well with foods that have a delicate flavor - the flavor of the mayonnaise overpowers instead of complements the food. 

 

I have used Flora sunflower oil (certified organic) many times with great success.  The flavor of the oil is perfectly neutral and the flavor of the mayonnaise is outstanding and marries well with herbs and spices.

 

Other oils - avocado - excellent, though expensive.  Produces one of the most stable end products which stores well for several days in the fridge.

Rice bran oil - very good, very stable, no breaking. 

Walnut oil - okay but a little strong - not for delicate application - although it is great for "baconnaise/lemon" - whipped with finely minced cooked bacon and grated lemon zest.

Coconut oil works but has a faint flavor of coconut.  It does separate in the fridge after a couple of days but reincorporates easily.

I even used some of my precious (expensive) Argan oil for a small batch made with just one medium egg yolk and it was lovely but had the flavor of the Argan, which I happen to love and with which I dressed a pasta salad. 

 

The two batches I made with grapeseed oil separated on standing in the fridge overnight.  Beating with a fork before using remedied the problem but I decided that other oils produced a more stable product. 


Edited by andiesenji (log)
  • Like 2

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally, less oil equals thicker, more oil equals thinner....the emulsifier (egg) can only do so much.

In the many mayo posts I've read over several years folks seem to have a problem with thinness much more often than they do with thickness.

  • Like 1

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If ever a recipe needs to use weights it is one for mayo. Yolks vary in size greatly. In a one-yolk recipe there isn't even the possibility of multiple yolks evening out the variation in size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If ever a recipe needs to use weights it is one for mayo. Yolks vary in size greatly. In a one-yolk recipe there isn't even the possibility of multiple yolks evening out the variation in size.

According to Harold McGee, variances in egg yolk size won't matter at all. His experiments concluded that a single average sized yolk has the ability to emulsify something in the range of 24 liters of oil as long as the water phase is kept sufficient to maintain oil droplet separation. Something in the range of 10 - 15 ml water for every 250 ml of oil was suggested. Of course, I've never attempted to replicate his experiment, I don't know what I'd do with 24 liters of mayo.

 

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am having trouble with avocado oil mayo. It hardens in the fridge and tends to split because of that. The texture is also strange after hardening. Is there any way I can prevent hardening? I use whole eggs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Avocado oil, like olive oil, becomes semisolid in the refrigerator.  I have never made avocado oil mayonnaise but my olive oil mayonnaise keeps pretty well in the refrigerator.

 

I suggest you try using egg yolks rather than whole eggs, and a whisk rather than an immersion blender.

 

If that does not work, try making smaller batches of mayonnaise so you don't have to store the leftovers.  Now you have me interested in trying a batch of avocado oil mayonnaise but I still have olive oil mayonnaise to finish first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am having trouble with avocado oil mayo. It hardens in the fridge and tends to split because of that. The texture is also strange after hardening. Is there any way I can prevent hardening? I use whole eggs. 

I have never had a problem with avocado oil mayo, but I only make the mayo with one third avocado oil and two-thirds light olive oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay this is the third time my avocado oil mayo is splitting after a week or so in the fridge. It's normal and tasty for the first weeks then it turns into the texture of butter. When taken out of the fridge and brought back up to room temperature it is broken.

 

I am trying a new batch with a new technique this time by soft boiling eggs until the yolk reaches a creamy consistency and using that instead of raw yolks in hopes it will stay stable. I will also be adding a little more water. If this doesn't work, it could be just the oil I'm using. Maybe using a blend of oils will fare better. If not I'll probably have to resort to using xantham gum or something

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the recipe for the mayo?

 

Is there an emulsifier?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay this is the third time my avocado oil mayo is splitting after a week or so in the fridge. It's normal and tasty for the first weeks then it turns into the texture of butter. When taken out of the fridge and brought back up to room temperature it is broken.

 

I am trying a new batch with a new technique this time by soft boiling eggs until the yolk reaches a creamy consistency and using that instead of raw yolks in hopes it will stay stable. I will also be adding a little more water. If this doesn't work, it could be just the oil I'm using. Maybe using a blend of oils will fare better. If not I'll probably have to resort to using xantham gum or something

 

Avocado oil is discussed upthread.  It is monounsaturated fat and seizes up when cold. Macadamia nut oil does the same when cold.  Those are not practical oils for a mayonnaise recipe unless it is consumed in a day, or cut with lots of seed oil.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So it is the solidification that causes the breakage? That doesn't explain why the emulsion is stable for up to a week even in the fridge. I think it has to do with the yolks breaking down somehow, who knows why....some enzymatic action, the presence of acid, fermentation...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My intuition says its a funny oil that caused the problem. Eggs are eggs. Mustard is mustard. But the oil is the variation from normal.

 

When I make mayo with peanut oil, eggs, mustard and lemon it is fridge-stable until I use it up weeks later.

 

Whether it is an impurity in your oil, or the oil itself...who knows?

 

Why not do an experiment. Make mayo with avocado oil and with veg oil. See which lasts longer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for reviving the thread.  I had not made mayonnaise for a few months.  Tonight I found a pasteurized egg in the refrigerator and whipped up a one yolk batch in a small bowl by the Raymond Sokolov method.  Very satisfactory, everything came out right.  I used about two thirds avocado oil to about one third extra virgin olive oil.  The salt and white pepper were ground to a fine powder in a mortar.  Also I used lime juice in place of lemon, which is just my preference and may have had something to do with the mai tai.

 

I confess I am not proud and I go through a lot of Hellman's for my sandwiches for work, however homemade mayonnaise is so easy!  One important difference is the cost.  Good oil is frightfully expensive.  Hellman's is cheap.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  I used about two thirds avocado oil to about one third extra virgin olive oil.  

 

Many extra virgin olive oils will seize up when cold as well.  I find that the best tasting mayonnaise have a larger proportion of neutral oils like grapeseed, and a nominal amount of olive oil, or else they are far too rich and taste more of olive oil than the other flavoring ingredients (mustard, acid, egg, etc...).

 

It is worth noting that quite a few general purpose extra virgin olive oils (not single source premium finishing oils) are blends from different quality olives and countries and will vary from container to container and year to year so one might seize more when cold whereas another might not.  When storing refrigerated items in olive oil it is wise to cut the oil with canola or grapeseed oil to keep it from seizing and it is easier to pick the items out of said oil rather than having clumps of what looks like slushy oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"""   slushy oil  """

 

love the stuff.  on toast.

 

but you have to eat fast.


Edited by rotuts (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a problem with mayo made with avocado oil, but I only add about 100ml. The other 200ml is from light olive oil. I have never had it separate on me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My recent batch of mayonnaise broke when I removed it from the refrigerator.  I would have been happy had it lasted a week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 yolks, 1.5 cup peanut oil, 1 tsp dijon, 1tbsp vinegar, salt... in a blender

Just had to say, I just made a batch and your recipe worked perfectly :)  Thanks!!!!

 

I had terrible luck last time (different recipe that used the whole egg instead of just the yolk).  Learned my lesson.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay so it's been a month since I've tried a new method...I cooked the yolk just above soft boiled and cut the avocado oil with about a quarter cup of MCT coconut oil. Mayo is still good as new and tastes great too. No breakage at all, though it has firmed up a bit. Overall, a success

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By bague25
      Which are the pickles you have in your pantry right now?
      Which are the ones you dream of?
      Any recipes? Any secrets? Any reading material?
      Please share - as Monica says Inquiring minds want to know...
    • By newchef
      I'm trying to make a Roasted Poblano and Black Bean Enchilada recipe and I don't know if the tomatillo cream sauce will be freezer-friendly.     Basically I process the following ingredients in a food processor to make the cream sauce.  I plan on freezing the sauce in ice-cube trays for individual servings.  The sauce will then be thawed and spread on a baking dish and also used to top the enchiladas and cook in a 400 degree oven.   Thanks!   INGREDIENTS:   -26 ounces canned tomatillos, drained -1 onion -1/2 cup cilantro leaves -1/3 cup vegetable broth -1/4 cup heavy cream -1 tbsp vegetable oil -3 garlic cloves -1 tbsp lime juice -1 tsp sugar -1 tsp salt
    • By markovitch
      A while ago, to learn the ins and outs of Horseradish, I began making my own mustard. I have managed some really really good varieties, (one with black mustard seeds, rice-wine vinegar, horseradish and Kabocha squash) and some really god awful ones too. I recall that my grandmother used to make her own ketchup too. it wasn't all that good.
      has anyone made their own condiments before?
      care to share experiences?
    • By Lisa Shock
      The basic formula for these cakes was developed by the wife of a mayonnaise salesman in an effort to help him out. I did a bit of research, and have found many variations. Early variants generally involve using less cocoa, which I cannot recommend. Later variants involve using cold water instead of boiling, adding salt, and additional leaveners. I personally do not feel that any additional salt is needed, as mayonnaise and that famous, tangy brand of salad dressing (sometimes the label just says 'Dressing') both contain a fair amount of salt. If you are using homemade mayonnaise or a low sodium product, an eighth teaspoon of salt may boost the flavor a bit. And, of course, somewhere along the way fans who prefer a certain salad dressing over mayonnaise started using it to make this cake. Nowadays, the Hellman's website has a different formula -one with added eggs and baking powder. I have not tried this newer formulation.
       
      Some versions of this recipe specify sifted cake flour. This will result in a very light cake with virtually no structural integrity, due to the paucity of eggs in this recipe compared to a regular cake. Cupcakes made this way give beautifully light results. However, every time I try to make a traditional 8" double layer cake with cake flour, I experience collapse. I recommend AP flour or at least a mix of cake and pastry flour.
       
      I have never made this with a gluten-free flour replacer. This recipe does not have very much structural integrity and as such does not make a good candidate for a gluten-free cake.
       
      I have made this cake many times, the type of sandwich spread you choose will affect the outcome. Made with mayonnaise, the cake has a good chocolate flavor and moistness. Made with that famous, tangy, off-white salad dressing that gets used as a sandwich spread, the cake has a subtle bit of extra brightness to the flavor. If one chooses to use a vegan mayonnaise, the result is tasty but lacking a little in structure; I would bake this in a square pan and frost and serve from the pan.
       
      The cocoa you use will also affect the flavor.  For a classic, homey flavor use a supermarket brand of cocoa. To add a little sophistication, use better, artisan type cocoa and use chocolate extract instead of the vanilla extract.
       
      Supposedly, the traditional frosting for this cake should have a caramel flavor. Look for one where you actually caramelize some sugar first. Modern recipes for the icing seem like weak imitations to me; using brown sugar as the main flavor instead of true caramel.
       
      Chocolate Mayonnaise or Salad Dressing Cake
      makes enough for two 8" round pans, or a 9" square (about 7 cups of batter)
       
      2 ounces/56g unsweetened, non-alkalized cocoa
      1 cup/236g boiling water
      1 teaspoon/4g regular strength vanilla extract
      3/4 cup/162g mayonnaise, vegan mayonnaise, or salad dressing (the tangy, off-white, sandwich spread type dressing)
      10.5ounces/300g all-purpose flour
      7 ounces/200g sugar
      0.35ounce/10g baking soda
       
      Preheat your oven to 350°.
      Grease or spray two 8" round pans or an equivalent volume square or rectangle.
      Place the cocoa in a medium (4-5 cup) bowl. Add the hot water and stir with a fork to break up any clumps. Allow to cool down a little,  then add the vanilla extract and the mayonnaise or salad dressing spread. Beat well to eliminate lumps. In the bowl of an electric mixer or larger regular bowl if making by hand, sift in the flour and add the sugar and baking soda. Mix the dry ingredients to distribute evenly. Slowly beat in the cocoa mixture. Mix until the batter has an even color. Pour immediately into the pans. If making two 8" rounds, weigh them to ensure they contain equal amounts.
      Bake for approximately 20 minutes, or until the center of the top springs back when touched lightly. (The toothpick test does NOT work well on this moist cake!) Allow the cake to cool a little and shrink from the sides of the pan before removing. Removal is easier while still a little warm.
      Good with or without frosting.
      Good beginner cake for kids to make.
       
       
       
    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...