Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Lemon Curd: The Topic


Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Soupcon said:

I love lemon curd and make my own using whole eggs and no water bath. It does come to a boil and does not curdle. I am wondering how to can lemon curd (or even if it is possible to can lemon curd) as I cannot possibly eat the quantity I make over a short period of time without gaining weight precipitously. Any thoughts on how to achieve this. I do have a pressure canner but not enough freezer space to contemplate freezing it.

 

 

You can water bath can lemon curd though the pH should be sufficiently acidic so most safety-oriented preserving sites like this one will recommend using bottled lemon juice since the acidity of fresh lemons is so variable. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

You can water bath can lemon curd though the pH should be sufficiently acidic so most safety-oriented preserving sites like this one will recommend using bottled lemon juice since the acidity of fresh lemons is so variable. 

 Thank you for the reply. Any clue as to what pH I need the lemon juice to be so that it is acidic enough as I hate bottled lemon or lime juice. Perhaps also adding citric acid if it is not the correct pH might also help. Litmus paper for testing pH can't be that hard to acquire. Water bath preserving is much easier to do in small batches (like 8  8oz  bottles) as my pressure canner is quite large and I would hate to fire it up for such a small quantity.

"Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi."

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh

Link to post
Share on other sites

This site which I have found to be mainly reliable suggests that you can water bath  process lemon curd but that even having done that it will need to be refrigerated. However they are giving a refrigerated shelflife of three months  which might be helpful.  Once open however even refrigerated the shelf life is  short. 

 

Here.

 

 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Anna N said:

This site which I have found to be mainly reliable suggests that you can water bath  process lemon curd but that even having done that it will need to be refrigerated. However they are giving a refrigerated shelflife of three months  which might be helpful.  Once open however even refrigerated the shelf life is  short. 

 

Here.

 

 

@ Anna N

Thanks for the suggestion. I am afraid I am the only one in my family who likes lemon curd and I doubt that I can consume 2 quarts in probably 4 months. The curd I make is actually quite tart unlike most of the other recipes I have found and is fool proof but does make large amounts for a single person to consume.  Which is why I was looking for a way to preserve the curd without ruining it and also not taking up freezer space. Looks like the freezer is the only route I have left. 

"Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi."

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh

Link to post
Share on other sites

 What prevents you from cutting down the recipe?

Edited by Anna N (log)
  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 8 months later...

@Anna N Never too late to reply. Well I have found a method for making lemon curd in a blender (Vitamix or blender of it's kind) which can be made in about 6 minutes. The Vitamix does all the cooking. I usually use a recipe calling for whole eggs and which brings the curd to a simmer for a minute to two and tweaked it for the Vitamix. Bloody genius. The finished product needs to be stashed in the fridge to set. Yummmm. See "thekitchn.com for the method. Use what ever recipe you like and tweak it to fit. 

  • Like 4

"Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi."

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh

Link to post
Share on other sites

 This is a simple little raspberry tart with lemon curd that I do every year at this time.  Just a shortbread pastry in a small mold, lemon curd and fresh raspberries.  It's good with whipped cream or ice cream.  I couldn't find an old photo but I also do a raspberry napoleon with layers of puff pastry, lemon curd and raspberries, then a dusting of powdered sugar on top.  Not fancy but easy to make and delicious when the raspberries are in season.Raspberry.JPG

  • Like 4
  • Delicious 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Soupcon said:

@Anna N Never too late to reply. Well I have found a method for making lemon curd in a blender (Vitamix or blender of it's kind) which can be made in about 6 minutes. The Vitamix does all the cooking. I usually use a recipe calling for whole eggs and which brings the curd to a simmer for a minute to two and tweaked it for the Vitamix. Bloody genius. The finished product needs to be stashed in the fridge to set. Yummmm. See "thekitchn.com for the method. Use what ever recipe you like and tweak it to fit. 

I've bookmarked that one for future use. I do love me some lemon curd, and since I lucked into a (vintage) Vitamix at the thrift store for $25 I've been looking for reasons to use it (I prefer a stick blender for soups, and I don't do smoothies, so it hasn't seen a lot of play so far).

  • Like 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 6/13/2018 at 1:44 PM, Soupcon said:

@Anna N Never too late to reply. Well I have found a method for making lemon curd in a blender (Vitamix or blender of it's kind) which can be made in about 6 minutes. The Vitamix does all the cooking. I usually use a recipe calling for whole eggs and which brings the curd to a simmer for a minute to two and tweaked it for the Vitamix. Bloody genius. The finished product needs to be stashed in the fridge to set. Yummmm. See "thekitchn.com for the method. Use what ever recipe you like and tweak it to fit. 

 

I tried the high speed blender method that @Soupcon mentions (Recipe: Easy Blender Lemon Curd) to make some lime curd and it is indeed very quick and easy. 

I followed the recipe as written, just substituting lime for lemon.

As in the photo on the website, it's opaque rather than the somewhat translucent product that I'm used to but it was fine for my purpose. 

IMG_8415.thumb.jpg.bddf304044a8717f34db488755cd6295.jpg

This photo was when it was still warm, it's set up a bit more now that it's cool but it's still a soft curd. 

The texture is very smooth. I microplaned the zest but didn't strain it and it's undetectable.  Guess 5 min at high speed in a Blendtec will do that. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

I always mix the butter and sugar until fluffy and light, add the eggs and yolks, followed by the juice. It will look curdled, but that’s okay. I put it into a small enameled cast iron pot-not a double boiler- over low heat until it smooths out and doesn’t look curdled anymore, stirring all the time. Then turn up to medium and stir until thick, (making sure that it gets to at least 160F to kill bacteria). Just don’t let it boil. Once thickened, take off heat and add the zest. Turns out perfectly every time!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

For those who've tried the Pierre Herme recipe, how would it compare in a lemon meringue pie compared to the traditional cornstarch-thickened filling? My intuition is that it may not set up as well (can always sub whole eggs for yolks and/or add a little bit of gelatin), and it may be a bit too rich (don't know how you could fix that), but the idea of using it instead of the usual cornstarch filling is very appealing to me.

 

On a tangential note, all recipes that I see online for lemon meringue pie use a regular French meringue. They then run into problems like weeping from an undercooked bottom of the meringue, and hence they have to use fixes like putting the meringue on the still-hot filling. Why don't they just use Swiss or Italian meringues, which would also make things simpler since they don't have to bake for as long, thereby also preventing beading from an overcooked top? I'm still just a beginner, so someone please correct me if my intuitions are wrong. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/13/2018 at 4:44 PM, Soupcon said:

@Anna N Never too late to reply. Well I have found a method for making lemon curd in a blender (Vitamix or blender of it's kind) which can be made in about 6 minutes. The Vitamix does all the cooking. I usually use a recipe calling for whole eggs and which brings the curd to a simmer for a minute to two and tweaked it for the Vitamix. Bloody genius. The finished product needs to be stashed in the fridge to set. Yummmm. See "thekitchn.com for the method. Use what ever recipe you like and tweak it to fit. 

I somehow missed this post.  I will be trying that method.  I like that it uses whole eggs.  I hate using just whites or yolks - I always save them vowing to use them and usually end up tossing them.

 

@Avachocolate - that is incredibly beautiful!  What kind of meringue? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/14/2020 at 4:19 PM, Avachocolate said:

@Cahoot....the Pierre Herme recipe sets up beautifully...I use it all the time in our Lemon Tart, don't even use a baked shell for it.

Screenshot_20200215-071636_Instagram-01.jpeg

 

wow so beautiful!! I've done this recipe and added gelatin to it but I take it that's not what you did? Did you just cook the curd, blend it then pour into the form with a liner and chill or cook it again? great work

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

I somehow missed this post.  I will be trying that method.  I like that it uses whole eggs.  I hate using just whites or yolks - I always save them vowing to use them and usually end up tossing them.

 

@Avachocolate - that is incredibly beautiful!  What kind of meringue? 

Just a basic Italian meringue...piped directly on, not baked

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, AAQuesada said:

 

wow so beautiful!! I've done this recipe and added gelatin to it but I take it that's not what you did? Did you just cook the curd, blend it then pour into the form with a liner and chill or cook it again? great work

Thank you...

You are correct, no gelatine, ...just cooked, strained, poured into a form and chilled...sets up beautifully

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I always mix everything together  with a mixer until all incorporated and the cook. The mouth feel is great and the color is always a creamy yellow. It also has a nice body to it. In doing it this way I have also noted that I never get that metallic taste that sometimes comes with lemon curd. Try it with some fresh thyme mixed in when cold. It’s amazing!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Eureka!!! For those of you who love lemon curd, you can freeze the damn stuff. I make mine with whole eggs so am not sure about how well curds made with egg yolks only survive freezing. I freeze the just made cooled lemon curd in 16 oz containers and then thaw it in the fridge when needed. Yippee.

 

  • Like 3

"Flay your Suffolk bought-this-morning sole with organic hand-cracked pepper and blasted salt. Thrill each side for four minutes at torchmark haut. Interrogate a lemon. Embarrass any tough roots from the samphire. Then bamboozle till it's al dente with that certain je ne sais quoi."

Arabella Weir as Minty Marchmont - Posh Nosh

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...