Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Lemon Curd: The Topic


bloviatrix
 Share

Recommended Posts

It wouldn't help for display purposes but I use Ph's lemon cream and it freezes really well. You could portion it into saleable amounts and have it ready to go upon request.

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It wouldn't help for display purposes but I use Ph's lemon cream and it freezes really well. You could portion it into saleable amounts and have it ready to go upon request.

Unless he has a display freezer . . I always make large batches and freeze lemon (or lime) curd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...
I'll take that as a No and keep on squeezing.

Haven't tried it, but I suspect it might really boost the flavour? Are you going to try it for us?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't tried it either but I'd be willing to just for the curiosity factor. Only problem is, I don't think the local grocery carries frozen lemon juice concentrate, just frozen lemonade concentrate, so it wouldn't be an accurate taste test. I was planning to work on an experimental grapefruit curd idea today or tomorrow so I don't mind doing an additional test while I'm at it if I can find a frozen lemon juice concentrate but I know the store pretty well and I don't remember seeing it there.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Alright. I took one for the team. I used a frozen Minute Made lemon juice from concentrate. Just juice and water. It was on sale for $2 for 250g. My recipe needed 450g so I added fresh - another 5 lemons. This wasn't a controlled experiment since I combined juices, but it gave me a good idea of the outcome.

I found the taste to be just a bit more subdued than normal. Still tangy and it saved me a decent amount of time. If I could find a bigger bottle of the concentrate I would try it again or find it on sale again. But it seems like a reasonable substitute. It definitely needs to be the frozen juice though not the lemonade.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 months later...

EMERGENCY!!

I made the FC Lemon Curd recipe and it came out just toooo sweet. Is there anything I can do to save it? It is going to be the filling for a cake. Is the only option to make the cake less sweet or can I do something to the curd? I just tasted it on Bread and it was still too sweet so short of making a sugarless cake, I don't know what to do....

Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't use the FC recipe but I have had a similar experience.

My fix was to put the curd in a double boiler, add 1/4 cup of lemon juice for each quart of curd, heat it fully and then add in an additional egg yolk then finish the process.

It should set up just as well as at first.

(My recipe makes 8 pints)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello All,

I just made the recipe from Elinor Klivans shown here.

http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/lemon_curd.aspx

I have never made lemon curd (or as I call it Lemon Butter) before.

The recipe and technique seemed very strait forward. The pictures helped ease any concern, especially regarding the splitting when lemon juice was added. I did make it with the assistance of a candy thermometer, but mixture thickened at exactly the right temperature.

I found the finished product to be fantastic. I would not say it turned out silky smooth, but very smooth compared to most lemon curds I have tasted. The whole process was incredibly easy (no need for double boilers, no straining required) and I can't wait to make another batch.

Cheers

Luke

Link to comment
Share on other sites

so the title says it all...i made a lemon curd a couple of times--one using stainless tools (bowls, whisk) and another using wood & glass. both times i followed the recipes exactly and when it was on the stove cooking (double boiler) it started smelling very metallic. when it cooled, the taste lessened a little bit but it was still very strong...to the point that 1/6 people liked it (and the following day that 1 person backed down)

used it solo as a topping for fruit and also as an ingredient in other recipes (lemon mousse)...its not just lemons but limes as well (key lime juice + eggs for key lime pie and same thing)

anyone know why this is happening (so i learn the reasons) as well as any tips for it not to happen (if this is even possible)?

thanks

Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know what your recipe is like, but I have found if there are too many yolks, it tends to taste metallic to me. I use a recipe that has half whole eggs and half yolks.

I have tried a lemon curd that had a little lime juice added, and I thought it took away from the lemon flavor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hmm...to be honest it was a while since i made it..just kind of gave up on it to be honest...frustrated me a bit not knowing what was happening

in any case, i don't really remember using both yolks + whole eggs. most recipes i've tried from the joy of cooking have come out good for me, and even their lemon curd recipe takes just yolks

this is the recipe from JoC

1-2/3 cups yield

3 large eggs

1/3 cup sugar

grated zest from 1 lemon

1/2 cup fresh lemon juice

6 tablespoons buter

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Danny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I made two batches of lemon bars (using Rose Beranbaum's recipe, which is my standard for curd) and something odd happened to the second batch as the bars were cooking. The curd developed a white sort of foamy layer on top.

This happened one other time to me ages ago, at which point someone told me I might have whisked too much air into the curd. Since then, I've been careful to mix more gently, and until today, I'd never had a recurrence.

Anyone know why this happens? It's not a big deal since the top can be covered with powdered sugar, but they're for a class, and I'd like to be able to tell my students why it happened to one batch and not the other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The white foam happened to me a few times as well, I think I incorporated too much air when whisking at the beginning. I switched to using a spatula instead (which involved an interesting experiment of me finding out the hard way which of my spatulas was made out of silicone, and which out of plastic :laugh: ) and one thing I did notice is that when I heated it enough and the mixture thickened, the white foam did get incorporated eventually

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The best and easiest Meyer lemon curd recipe I have ever used, I found on http://www.eddyvandammeusa.com/2009/12/meyer-lemon-tarts/ . The method is like none I have ever seen and it works fantastic.

whoa. thanks for the recipe and site!!

foodpr0n.com 11/01/17: A map of macarons in Toronto // For free or for a fee - bring your bottle! corkagetoronto.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Does anyone know, roughly, what maximum temperature I can bring my lemon curd to before it begins to scramble? I'm hoping to make my lemon tart set a little more firmly. I'll start experimenting today, but can anyone give me any estimate for this first (measured) experiment? 170-180F? The proportions are roughly 1/2 cup lemon juice to 2 eggs + 2 yolks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

actually, that all depends on agitation and pressure. Put the egg protein in a vacuum and spin at speeds up to mach 2 and you can raise the temperature well above 250F (which is the temperature that even the most stubborn of pathogens cannot handle)

But who does that right?

But seriously, with very vigorous and consistent agitation the proteins can reach higher temps than 180 just by hand, just don't push it.

Edited by chiantiglace (log)

Dean Anthony Anderson

"If all you have to eat is an egg, you had better know how to cook it properly" ~ Herve This

Pastry Chef: One If By Land Two If By Sea

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does anyone know, roughly, what maximum temperature I can bring my lemon curd to before it begins to scramble? I'm hoping to make my lemon tart set a little more firmly. I'll start experimenting today, but can anyone give me any estimate for this first (measured) experiment? 170-180F? The proportions are roughly 1/2 cup lemon juice to 2 eggs + 2 yolks.

Have you looked at changing the ratio of ingredients? Adding a little more butter would give a firmer finish when cooled

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...