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bloviatrix

Lemon Curd: The Topic

299 posts in this topic

I'm thinking of layering lemon curd with cheesecake.

As in (from bottom up) some sort of crust, lemon curd, cheesecake, and then lemon curd again.

But should I bake the first three layers (crust, curd cheesecake) and then pour more lemon curd on top and bake just until it sets?

I want to try the PH recipe, unless it's not as perfectly suited to what I have in mind as something else?

That layering isn't going to work out well. You can't really bake a curd unless you have a ton of cornstarch in it, and I'm asuming you'll want to bake the cheesecake layer. Unless it's a no bake cheesecake, but the cure would still squish out under the weight unless you cut it while frozen I guess.

I would just recomend a thin layer of curd on top.

*pouts* Oh well. At least someone told me before I found out the hard way.

Thanks Sethro!

Hmm... But Lemon Curd does freeze okay, right? I think K8 talked about freezing the stuff?

So I could bake cheesecake (without a base) on a sheetpan, and layer it. :cool:


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I'm thinking of layering lemon curd with cheesecake.

As in (from bottom up) some sort of crust, lemon curd, cheesecake, and then lemon curd again.

But should I bake the first three layers (crust, curd cheesecake) and then pour more lemon curd on top and bake just until it sets?

I want to try the PH recipe, unless it's not as perfectly suited to what I have in mind as something else?

That layering isn't going to work out well. You can't really bake a curd unless you have a ton of cornstarch in it, and I'm asuming you'll want to bake the cheesecake layer. Unless it's a no bake cheesecake, but the cure would still squish out under the weight unless you cut it while frozen I guess.

I would just recomend a thin layer of curd on top.

*pouts* Oh well. At least someone told me before I found out the hard way.

Thanks Sethro!

Hmm... But Lemon Curd does freeze okay, right? I think K8 talked about freezing the stuff?

So I could bake cheesecake (without a base) on a sheetpan, and layer it. :cool:

When I used to do this I would par-bake the crust (not always necesary depending on the type), bake the cheesecake right onto that, let it cool and then spread the still warm curd over top. Freeze and cut.

gallery_20409_2985_10015.jpg


Edited by Sethro (log)

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I just gotta kno, Sethromybro, is that marjoram or thyme atop your confection?

I would just like to dedicate this morning's lemon bars to Joanne Chang at Flour bakery; thanks for posting when those bastards at Taunton's tried to gatekeep your recipe. Your curd is the wurd, JC.

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It was micro cinammon basil.

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*groan* So that's what I forgot today: Cream cheese for my plan to imitate the inimitable Sethro!


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I might need to start a new thread for this question but hope it gets noticed here. Can PH lemon cream be used instead of lemon curd to make a lemon curd cake? This is not Emily Lucchetti's curd cake where the curd is mixed into the batter--it is a layer cake with curd between the layers and mixed with whipped cream for icing.

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I might need to start a new thread for this question but hope it gets noticed here.  Can PH lemon cream be used instead of lemon curd to make a lemon curd cake?  This is not Emily Lucchetti's curd cake where the curd is mixed into the batter--it is a layer cake with curd between the layers and mixed with whipped cream for icing.

You will need a buttercream dam for the layers. And you will have to cut the cake frozen.

Not sure how it'll last mixed with the whipped cream for icing.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I have made the cake several times using lemon curd--I have learned the "tricks" the hard way--chill layers before icing, make dam to prevent curd seepage, make 4 thin layers instead of 2 thicker ones, use skewers until it is set etc. I love the curd/cream icing and just wondered if the lemon cream will give the same results as curd. This has become one of my favorite cakes.

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I have made the cake several times using lemon curd--I have learned the "tricks" the hard way--chill layers before icing, make dam to prevent curd seepage, make 4 thin layers instead of 2 thicker ones, use skewers until it is set etc.  I love the curd/cream icing and just wondered if the lemon cream will give the same results as curd.  This has become one of my favorite cakes.

Oh....I thought the Lemon Cream is a curd? :blink:


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Yes, it is a curd. I have not made it and wondered if it would give same results. I think the only difference is in the technique and I would think it would be just as tart, but I don't know that.

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Yes, it is a curd.  I have not made it and wondered if it would give same results.  I think the only difference is in the technique and I would think it would be just as tart, but I don't know that.

I'm no curd expert, but it tastes pretty tart to me. Comparable to the Medrich recipe I made before this.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I am planning on making it(cake)this weekend so will probably make the curd earlier. Thanks for your help.

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I wanted to thank you all for this tread and all the info contained herein. As it so happens I had to do a wedding cake this weekend with Lemon Curd filling. Im not really a fan, and as it turns out, it was because of the crap recipe I had.

I did a little tweeking to the Sherry Yard Recipe, doubling the original, adding 1 extra egg yolk, 2 extra table spoons of butter (just cuz butter makes everything betta) and another 1/3 cup of sugar (I guess my lemon tree is a little on the tart side so it was necessary).

It came out pretty thick, like pudding and was wonderful to fill the cake. I have a ton left over so Im making a bunch of goodies to use up the extra.

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I used the lemon cream to fill 2 cakes this weekend and it worked wonderfully. I spread the cream in 2 pans the same size as the cake, lined with plastic. Froze them, put between split cake layers and iced one with lemon buttercream(Paige Retus'[Olives]recipe and the other with lemon curd mixed with whipped cream. I refrigerated them overnight then attempted to decide which I liked better. Undecided at this point--they are both fabulous! I guess I would call it a draw.

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I frequently use lemon curd with my cakes and have found great success when I freeze it for short periods of time.

I have to make sure that I cook it long enough for it to thicken - actually using an instant read thermometer to make sure it hits 170+ degrees. After straining and refrigerating it, I'll freeze it in a plastic container with plastic wrap laying directly on top of the curd.

I've made RLB's lime curd as a filling for coconut cakes - customers like that combo, too. But, I haven't tried any other lime curd recipes.

I've used her orange curd, too, and found it to be soft and sweet, but quite delicious. Mixed with white chocolate mousse, it's a fabulous cake filling!

Does anyone have good recipes for orange and lime curd recipes that they'd like to share?


Beaches Pastry

May your celebrations be sweet!

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Interesting. So none of you use gelatine in your curd ? Am I cheating ?

(from Jan Hedhs recipe):

2 g gelatine

150 g eggs

75 g +75 g sugar

75 g lemon juice

zest from 1.5 lemons

100 g unsalted butter

Soak gelatin in cold water

Whisk egg and 75g sugar to poreuse stage.

Bring zest, the other 75g sugar, butter and lemon juice to a boil.

Pour lemon mixture over egg/sugar and mix.

Pour mixture into a sauce pan or similar and bring gently to a boil while whisking.

Remove pot from heat and whisk till it's very smooth.

Squeeze water out of gelatine sheet, drop it into curd and stir until gelatine has melted.

Strain. Pour directly into tarte or chill rapidly in water bath and cover.

Conversions for the imperial crowd :raz: :

2g gelatine = 1 sheet

150 g eggs = 3 eggs depending on size

150 g sugar = 2/3 cup

75 g lemon juice = 5 tbsp

100 g butter = 7 tbsp

Texture is silk smooth. Consistency is pretty stiff but not wobbly jello-ish, rather soft butter-ish.

Taste could imho be a bit more pronounced, next time I'll probably add some more zest. Couldn't detect metallic taste so amount of sequestrant is enough. Just make sure that high enough temps are reached for the proteins to coagulate.

Scent is light citrusy.

Sorry no pictures. Only have scanner. Spreading curd on the scanner is probably not a great idea.

btw Hi, I'm new here.


Edited by priich (log)

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Interesting. So none of you use gelatine in your curd ? Am I cheating ?

(from Jan Hedhs recipe):

2 g gelatine

150 g eggs

75 g +75 g sugar

75 g lemon juice

zest from 1.5 lemons

100 g unsalted butter

Soak gelatin in cold water

Whisk egg and 75g sugar to poreuse stage.

Bring zest, the other 75g sugar, butter and lemon juice to a boil.

Pour lemon mixture over egg/sugar and mix.

Pour mixture into a sauce pan or similar and bring gently to a boil while whisking.

Remove pot from heat and whisk till it's very smooth.

Squeeze water out of gelatine sheet, drop it into curd and stir until gelatine has melted.

Strain. Pour directly into tarte or chill rapidly in water bath and cover.

Conversions for the imperial crowd  :raz: :

2g gelatine = 1 sheet

150 g eggs = 3 eggs depending on size

150 g sugar = 2/3 cup

75 g lemon juice = 5 tbsp

100 g butter = 7 tbsp

Texture is silk smooth. Consistency is pretty stiff but not wobbly jello-ish, rather soft butter-ish.

Taste could imho be a bit more pronounced, next time I'll probably add some more zest. Couldn't detect metallic taste so amount of sequestrant is enough. Just make sure that high enough temps are reached for the proteins to coagulate.

Scent is light citrusy.

Sorry no pictures. Only have scanner. Spreading curd on the scanner is probably not a great idea.

btw Hi, I'm new here.

They spread curd on the scanner at Moto.

Just kidding. heh heh.

I use gelatine sometimes depending on what the application is. I also like to raise it all the way to a boil and then stick blend it. I find the coagulation at that point is enought that it will stand fine at fridge temp without weeping.

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

If I want to sandwich a cake with lemon curd folded into whipped cream, what would be ideal ratios/recipe? Mine appears rather liquid, but it's not yet been in the fridge overnight.

Is it possible for me to fold the curd into a Italian or Swiss Meringue instead of whipped cream? I'm not talking about a buttercream here (I've made it from scratch, and it's not really my favorite frosting), but just the meringue part. I'd be using it to fill/frost cake.

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

Great! I'll try this again next week.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

Have you tried the Fine Cooking lemon curd recipe? You beat the eggs and sugar with the butter, then cook. I haven't had any problem with coagulation when lemon curd is made this way.

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

Hmm. What temperature are you cooking your curd to?


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

Have you tried the Fine Cooking lemon curd recipe? You beat the eggs and sugar with the butter, then cook. I haven't had any problem with coagulation when lemon curd is made this way.

I made this recipe, and I felt it was too liquid. Maybe I didn't cook enough?

A few questions:

Is it possible to make a curd without the egg white coagulating? Or is something I should just deal with and sieve all my curds?

Thanks!

By the way, lemon curd cheesecake bars Are Good Things. :smile:

If you beat the eggs really well before you add the other ingredients, that will help. Your eggs should be beaten as if you used an immersion blender and the curd will come out nice and smooth.

Or, beat the eggs with the sugar before adding the other ingredients. This makes for a more viscous mixture, which helps the egg whites get evenly dispersed. Thinking literally about it, of course, you actually want the egg whites to coagulate to some extent -- that's what forms the gel that makes a curd thicken and become a curd, as opposed to a sauce. You just want the egg to be evenly dispersed before it coagulates, and control the degree to which coagulation occurs.

That's what I've been doing, actually, but I still got a lot of coagulated egg whites (not curd)--at least, it seemed a lot to me, since it was only the second time that I've made lemon curd. Which was why I asked.

Hmm. What temperature are you cooking your curd to?

I have no idea. My thermometer doesn't take temps below 190F. Note to self: Why didn't you look more closely at it before you bought it?


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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