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bloviatrix

Lemon Curd: The Topic

299 posts in this topic

I'm sorry I didn't post this earlier--but I also found out that he FC lemon curd doesn't hold up enough in a tart. I love the taste and usually use it to spread on shortbread or in between layers of cake. The one time I did use it in a tart, it was too runny and I couldn't get clean slices.


Edited by Ling (log)

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Thanks.  I ended up doubling the recipe and it filled just perfectly.  I must add that this Fine Cooking recipe lacked body.  I don't know why, but I found PH's lemon cream held together much better.  Perhaps I will have to add some gelatin next time, unless you guys have another solution.

I must say that I glazed the top with a raspberry glaze with white chocolate stripes.  It had the wow factor, but being a perfectionist, I did like the lack of body.

Sounds great -- I love lemon and raspberry (blueberry, too). What did you use for a glaze? Was the white chocolate just tempered white?

Thanks!

I just used a bag of frozen raspberries, press raspberries and jam through fine sieve into sauce-pan; stir in grenadine. Sprinkle with gelatin; let stand for 1 minute. Warm over medium heat, stirring, for 5 minutes or until dissolved; strain. Refrigerate for 20 minutes or until cool but pourable.

The white chocolate was just melted and put through a paper cone and drizzled over the raspberry glaze. Looks just fab.

One thing I must note, the raspberry glaze had a tendency to slip off the curd, something like what some people have experienced with merange and lemon curd.

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I'm sorry I didn't post this earlier--but I also found out that he FC lemon curd doesn't hold up enough in a tart. I love the taste and usually use it to spread on shortbread or in between layers of cake. The one time I did use it in a tart, it was too runny and I couldn't get clean slices.

Exactly

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The best lemon curd needs the best lemons...Meyer lemons in this case. We have them in California. But if they are not available to you, try 2/3 regular lemons (Eureka) and 1/3 orange juice. But do seek out Meyer lemons.

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I believe Meyer lemons, when in season, can be found in all major cities. Meyer lemon curd is indeed delicious. I'm assuming the recipes for Meyer lemon curd use less sugar, though...and are not interchangable with regular lemon curd recipes.

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I need a recipe to use as a filling in a 3 tier wedding cake (unexpected request, has to be ready saturday). I'd like something that sets a little firmer than a typical curd. Anyone have a recipe they've used in this way?

Thanks in advance!


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I have a very old recipe (my great-grandmother's recipe!) for apple lemon cheese that does set up slightly firmer than traditional lemon curd. I don't know if it will be firm enough for your need but it might be worth a try.

The recipe has been adapted for use with Meyer lemons in a North American kitchen; the original recipe used "regular" lemons and castor sugar (and had sliced apples in it but I took those out completely!). I've made it with both berry sugar and regular sugar with good success.

It does occur to me that you might be able to make it even thicker by adding one more egg. Might be worth a try...

1 T plus 2 tsp finely grated Meyer lemon zest

1 cup freshly-squeezed Meyer lemon juice

1-1/3 cup sugar

4 large eggs

3/4 cup plus 2 T butter, cut into tablespoon-sized pieces

Whisk together zest, lemon juice, sugar, eggs and a pinch of salt in a 2 quart heavy saucepan. Add butter all at once and cook over moderately low heat, whisking constantly, until cheese is thick enough to hold marks of the whisk and the first bubbles appear on the surface.

Immediately pour into a bowl or jar, then chill, covered.

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Thank you for the recipe, Jensen.

It occurred to me after I asked the question that I could do the lemon curd filling like a lemon pie filling -- cooking cornstarch with water, then adding the other ingredients.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Thank you for the recipe, Jensen.

It occurred to me after I asked the question that I could do the lemon curd filling like a lemon pie filling -- cooking cornstarch with water, then adding the other ingredients.

Yeah, that's why I dug out this recipe. The original is for "apple cheese cake", essentially a pie made of apple slices in lemon cheese. I think the whole eggs make it thick enough to stand up as a pie filling but while maintaining the richness associated with lemon curd.

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I need a recipe to use as a filling in a 3 tier wedding cake (unexpected request, has to be ready saturday). I'd like something that sets a little firmer than a typical curd. Anyone have a recipe they've used in this way?

Thanks in advance!

Pierre Herme's Lemon Cream. Line the cake pans with plastic wrap, freeze the cream in the pan, then lay it right into the cake as you construct it.

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I need a recipe to use as a filling in a 3 tier wedding cake (unexpected request, has to be ready saturday). I'd like something that sets a little firmer than a typical curd. Anyone have a recipe they've used in this way?

Thanks in advance!

Pierre Herme's Lemon Cream. Line the cake pans with plastic wrap, freeze the cream in the pan, then lay it right into the cake as you construct it.

I've done that before, e.g. in Herme's Riviera, but never in a 12" cake that will likely be out of refrigeration for several hours before serving. I'm afraid that it would not stand up well.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I need a recipe to use as a filling in a 3 tier wedding cake (unexpected request, has to be ready saturday). I'd like something that sets a little firmer than a typical curd. Anyone have a recipe they've used in this way?

Thanks in advance!

Pierre Herme's Lemon Cream. Line the cake pans with plastic wrap, freeze the cream in the pan, then lay it right into the cake as you construct it.

I've done that before, e.g. in Herme's Riviera, but never in a 12" cake that will likely be out of refrigeration for several hours before serving. I'm afraid that it would not stand up well.

why do you think lemon curd would stand up any better? the lemon cream is really nothing but a curd with the butter added at a different point at a different temp and then whizzed with a stick blender. You could make a lemon gel insert that won't melt. I did that once with passion fruit and it worked ok.


Edited by McDuff (log)

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I need a recipe to use as a filling in a 3 tier wedding cake (unexpected request, has to be ready saturday). I'd like something that sets a little firmer than a typical curd. Anyone have a recipe they've used in this way?

Thanks in advance!

Pierre Herme's Lemon Cream. Line the cake pans with plastic wrap, freeze the cream in the pan, then lay it right into the cake as you construct it.

I've done that before, e.g. in Herme's Riviera, but never in a 12" cake that will likely be out of refrigeration for several hours before serving. I'm afraid that it would not stand up well.

why do you think lemon curd would stand up any better?

I don't, at least not a typical lemon curd, which is why I asked for a recipe "that sets a little firmer than a typical curd." What I just did, and tomorrow I'll see how it turns out, is make something similar to Herme's lemon cream, just with a higher proportion of eggs and a lower proportion of butter. I ended up using 12 yolks + 2 whole eggs to 1C juice, 3T zest, 300g sugar, 240g butter mixed in at the end.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I was searching for passionfruit curd and decided to use the FC recipe, but substitute Boiron passionfruit puree for the lemon juice. It turned out wonderful ~ I can barely stop eating it. I think it would be perfect in small tart shells (I'm thinking the City Bakery recipe) with a browned Italian meringue a la Dahlia Bakery. I'll probably try yuzu, too: anyone have a favorite brand of bottled yuzu juice that can be found in a Japanese market (e.g., Mitsuwa)?

I like the fact that the recipe has so much less butter than the Herme recipe. Makes me feel that much less guilty when I spoon it directly from the fridge. :biggrin:

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I was searching for passionfruit curd and decided to use the FC recipe, but substitute Boiron passionfruit puree for the lemon juice. It turned out wonderful ~ I can barely stop eating it.

I made the FC lemon curd a few days ago but used 1/2 c lemon juice and 1/2 c butter. It came out wonderful!!! It was firmer than when made using the recipe as written (as I'd hoped) and still just the right tartness and sweetness for me and so smooth and creamy. I used half, lightened with whipped cream for a cake roll for a friend and the other half got eaten, spoonfull at a time, straight out of the fridge. :biggrin: I bought more lemons.

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You may want to try this. Look at about June 26th.

This is a recipe for Lemon Cheese which is then incorporated into what I call a lemon Brulee. Never fails to please especially when the roasted fruit variation is served.

I'll try to remember to take some pictures next time I make this. It looks great when served in tall open mouthed glasses.

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Carrying on from Patrick's search for a lemon curd that sets a little firmer than a typical curd, can anyone tell me if adding the additional eggs (and should it be just yolks?) will work to produce a slightly firmer curd? I'd like to use it in as a cake filling as well - sitting over a cream filling in the middle, and on the top of the cake.

I used RLB's recipe and am wanting to try the FC recipe, but need it to set firmer.

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Carrying on from Patrick's search for a lemon curd that sets a little firmer than a typical curd, can anyone tell me if adding the additional eggs (and should it be just yolks?) will work to produce a slightly firmer curd?  I'd like to use it in as a cake filling as well - sitting over a cream filling in the middle, and on the top of the cake.

I used RLB's recipe and am wanting to try the FC recipe, but need it to set firmer.

I filled a wedding cake using the egg-rich recipe I posted a while back, and it worked out fine -- no squishing out of lemon curd when the cake was cut, even on the 12" tier. But if you want a lemon filling that is pretty much gauranteed to be firm enough, you could do a cornstarch-thickened lemon filling, as you would do for a lemon meringue pie.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Carrying on from Patrick's search for a lemon curd that sets a little firmer than a typical curd, can anyone tell me if adding the additional eggs (and should it be just yolks?) will work to produce a slightly firmer curd?  I'd like to use it in as a cake filling as well - sitting over a cream filling in the middle, and on the top of the cake.

I used RLB's recipe and am wanting to try the FC recipe, but need it to set firmer.

I filled a wedding cake using the egg-rich recipe I posted a while back, and it worked out fine -- no squishing out of lemon curd when the cake was cut, even on the 12" tier. But if you want a lemon filling that is pretty much gauranteed to be firm enough, you could do a cornstarch-thickened lemon filling, as you would do for a lemon meringue pie.

Patrick, do you have any pix of the wedding cake to show off? I'm sure I'm not the only one who'd love to see it!

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Carrying on from Patrick's search for a lemon curd that sets a little firmer than a typical curd, can anyone tell me if adding the additional eggs (and should it be just yolks?) will work to produce a slightly firmer curd?  I'd like to use it in as a cake filling as well - sitting over a cream filling in the middle, and on the top of the cake.

I used RLB's recipe and am wanting to try the FC recipe, but need it to set firmer.

I filled a wedding cake using the egg-rich recipe I posted a while back, and it worked out fine -- no squishing out of lemon curd when the cake was cut, even on the 12" tier. But if you want a lemon filling that is pretty much gauranteed to be firm enough, you could do a cornstarch-thickened lemon filling, as you would do for a lemon meringue pie.

Patrick, do you have any pix of the wedding cake to show off? I'm sure I'm not the only one who'd love to see it!

Thanks, Ruth, but me showing off my wedding cake here, in the company of true cake decorating black belts, would be like entering a rusted-out 72' Ford Pinto in the car show . . . I'd rather not! I'll describe it though -- three tiers, 6", 9", 12", each tier filled with lemon curd, and covered with vanilla mousseline buttercream. A small red ribbon was around the base of each tier. I was asked to do the cake like 2 days before the wedding (nephew's shotgun wedding), so it was rushed.


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Carrying on from Patrick's search for a lemon curd that sets a little firmer than a typical curd, can anyone tell me if adding the additional eggs (and should it be just yolks?) will work to produce a slightly firmer curd?  I'd like to use it in as a cake filling as well - sitting over a cream filling in the middle, and on the top of the cake.

I used RLB's recipe and am wanting to try the FC recipe, but need it to set firmer.

I filled a wedding cake using the egg-rich recipe I posted a while back, and it worked out fine -- no squishing out of lemon curd when the cake was cut, even on the 12" tier. But if you want a lemon filling that is pretty much gauranteed to be firm enough, you could do a cornstarch-thickened lemon filling, as you would do for a lemon meringue pie.

Patrick, do you have any pix of the wedding cake to show off? I'm sure I'm not the only one who'd love to see it!

Thanks, Ruth, but me showing off my wedding cake here, in the company of true cake decorating black belts, would be like entering a rusted-out 72' Ford Pinto in the car show . . . I'd rather not! I'll describe it though -- three tiers, 6", 9", 12", each tier filled with lemon curd, and covered with vanilla mousseline buttercream. A small red ribbon was around the base of each tier. I was asked to do the cake like 2 days before the wedding (nephew's shotgun wedding), so it was rushed.

Aw, come on. Your photos are always great, I'll bet your just being modest. Your decorating is probably better than most, and with a little creative posing, you could bring out the best in the photo of the cake I know its definitely better than mine.

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Thanks, Ruth, but me showing off my wedding cake here, in the company of true cake decorating black belts, would be like entering a rusted-out 72' Ford Pinto in the car show . . . I'd rather not! I'll describe it though -- three tiers, 6", 9", 12", each tier filled with lemon curd, and covered with vanilla mousseline buttercream. A small red ribbon was around the base of each tier. I was asked to do the cake like 2 days before the wedding (nephew's shotgun wedding), so it was rushed.

Hey there, Mister, if I can post a cake here, so can you!! It sounds lucious.

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But if you want a lemon filling that is pretty much gauranteed to be firm enough, you could do a cornstarch-thickened lemon filling, as you would do for a lemon meringue pie.

Thanks Patrick... will try. I will add my entreaty to the others to see your cake :biggrin:

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I'm thinking of layering lemon curd with cheesecake.

As in (from bottom up) some sort of crust, lemon curd, cheesecake, and then lemon curd again.

But should I bake the first three layers (crust, curd cheesecake) and then pour more lemon curd on top and bake just until it sets?

I want to try the PH recipe, unless it's not as perfectly suited to what I have in mind as something else?


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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I'm thinking of layering lemon curd with cheesecake.

As in (from bottom up) some sort of crust, lemon curd, cheesecake, and then lemon curd again.

But should I bake the first three layers (crust, curd cheesecake) and then pour more lemon curd on top and bake just until it sets?

I want to try the PH recipe, unless it's not as perfectly suited to what I have in mind as something else?

That layering isn't going to work out well. You can't really bake a curd unless you have a ton of cornstarch in it, and I'm asuming you'll want to bake the cheesecake layer. Unless it's a no bake cheesecake, but the cure would still squish out under the weight unless you cut it while frozen I guess.

I would just recomend a thin layer of curd on top.

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