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bloviatrix

Lemon Curd: The Topic

299 posts in this topic

Patrick or anyone else who's used PH's Lemon Cream... do you think I could use it to make lemon squares on a shortbread crust and then freeze till needed?

I think this would work. The cream is quite stiff so it cuts beautifully in a tart form. It should be stiff enough for a lemon square.

I have never frozen the lemon cream, but looking at the ingredients I don't see why it wouldn't work.

Try it! :biggrin:


Life is short, eat dessert first

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can you freeze lemon curd than deforst it and use ..

I was just wondering

thanks


I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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can you freeze lemon curd than deforst it and use ..

I was just wondering

thanks

wouldn't it split after defrosting ? like all egg sauces, mayonaise and custard and so forth. mmmmmmmmmmmm... may be a little bit of corn flour as a thickener might help, Just wondering too, I want to know too. anyone ?

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You can actually freeze it. I recently did and it worked out fine. It was a standard batch with no gelatine and responded just fine - perhaps a little thinner but overall OK. I would add a little gelatine next time. Maybe just a sheet or two to an 8 egg batch.

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can you freeze lemon curd than deforst it and use ..

I was just wondering

thanks

I freeze lemon curd all the time with no ill effects. The recipe I use is all egg yolks & butter (no gelatine or other stabilizers).

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We freeze it all the time at work in desserts we make, and we don't add gelatin either. Works just fine.

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Thanks everyone

I use an all egg formula

with no gelatine or anything

i am going to try it..


I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

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How about posting your recipe?

I've never managed a good one without the aid of geletin. Would love to see yours.


willson @ Will's Eats

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How about posting your recipe?

I've never managed a good one without the aid of geletin.  Would love to see yours.

There is a whole thread about the best lemon curd. Enjoy!

click here for lemon curd thread

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I've run into a problem and I'm wondering if anyone can help. I've just made lemon tarts in mini-muffin size shells using PH's lemon curd. I piped in the curd but didn't smooth the top. Then I put melted apple jelly on top to glaze and pressed a single apple jelly-glazed blueberry into each. When I pushed the blueberry in to flatten the top, cracks appeared in the lemon curd. Of course I didn't notice this till they were all done. I usually smooth the lemon cream before putting the apple jelly on so I can just set the blueberry on top but couldn't see a reason why I couldn't skip this step. Well now I know but in the meantime I have these cracked tops. Is there anything I can do to fix them? Maybe set them in a slightly warm oven for a bit? I don't have time to remake them and I'm fortunate they are for a family event so all will be forgiven but I would have liked a better appearance. Any ideas? I've got them in the fridge right now.


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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I don't know of how to fix this now that it's done. You could attempt another layer of your jelly over this, if your certain it won't crack either. Or if your desperate.....you could sprinkle some find white chocolate shavings over them if they'll stick to your glazed area......sort of hiding what's beneath.

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Yep, that's Herme's lemon cream. Easily one of the best-tasting substances in the known universe.

I made PH's lemon cream this weekend. It tastes like a bit of ambrosia to me! All other lemon cream receipes will be put on the back shelf and this one will be a standby. Very creamy, rich and tart all at the same time!

I had no problem getting the mixture to 180 degrees. I don't own a double boiler, so rigged up a system with a smallish stainless steel saucepan inside a larger one. The small top pan did not touch the boiling water. What did surprise me though, was how quickly it cooled to 140 degrees - the temp at which you add the butter.

I made a tart with some of it and spread freshly whipped cream over the top (just to add a few more calories :biggrin: ). I ate some straight out of the bowl as I could not seem to stop myself, and mixed the last bit with fresh BC strawberries in a ramekin and the leftover whipped cream on top of that.

Fabulous!!!!!!!!

This is the one cream that I have found to be consistent, easy and reliable to taste. I love the tartness and the less sweetness. Too many curds are too sweet for me.


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.

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I don't know if this is the traditional way to do it, but I start with a milk and a tablespoon of flour. I thicken this on the stove at low heat. Then I add the butter and sugar. I take it off the heat and let it cool a little, then I stir in some lemon zest and juice, and a few egg yolks. If it isn't thick enough at that point (it usually is) I give it a little more heat. I find this makes for a nice thick, very rick, stable lemon curd.

I don't generally use a specific recipe, but guidelines seem to be about 1.5-2 cups milk, 1 tablespoon flour, juice of one lemon, 2-4 egg yolks, 2-4 tablespoons of butter, a half cup of sugar, and about a half teaspoon of zest. I taste as I go along because the lemons differ in tartness and the milk differs in sweetness.

I'm curious as to whether anybody else tried using flour or cornstarch as a thickener. I find that it's much more foolproof that way rather than relying purely on the egg yolks for thickening.

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I don't know of how to fix this now that it's done. You could attempt another layer of your jelly over this, if your certain it won't crack either. Or if your desperate.....you could sprinkle some find white chocolate shavings over them if they'll stick to your glazed area......sort of hiding what's beneath.

Thanks Wendy! I think I'll try the white chocolate. They will just look a little more decadent and no one will be the wiser. :wink:


Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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I'm curious as to whether anybody else tried using flour or cornstarch as a thickener. I find that it's much more foolproof that way rather than relying purely on the egg yolks for thickening.

I think the deal-breaker here for me would be whether the flour is discernable in the finished curd, either by taste or by mouth-feel. What's your take on that?

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I'm curious as to whether anybody else tried using flour or cornstarch as a thickener. I find that it's much more foolproof that way rather than relying purely on the egg yolks for thickening.

I think the deal-breaker here for me would be whether the flour is discernable in the finished curd, either by taste or by mouth-feel. What's your take on that?

I've done this many times and there is no discernable flour flavor or mouthfeel. We're talking about a small amount of flour and it is cooked with the milk. You can even back off the flour a bit more and it still has a lot of thickening power.

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OK so I made the Fine Cooking lemon curd and Pierre Herme's lemon cream (I know, that was fast, wasn't it? :raz: )

Here are the pics. I followed the directions exactly as written for each recipe.

All the pictures were taken prior to refrigeration.

1. side by side comparison, so you can see the differences in colour. The FC one is on the left, and the PH one is on the right.

37eb8f51.jpg

2. FC curd...hopefully you can see how thick it is. It was not runny at all, and firmed up even at room temperature. You can see some brown specks in the curd--that's because even though I followed the directions and had the heat on medium, a little bit of the curd browned as soon as I poured it into the saucepan. Though the recipe says to cook it on medium, I cooked it on low heat. It thickened in the time specified--about 15 minutes (well, more like 13 minutes).

57c6c05c.jpg

DSC01290.jpg

3. the PH lemon cream...this was looser than the lemon curd, but not runny

DSC01294.jpg

DSC01296.jpg

I must say, I was really disappointed with the lemon cream. I followed the instructions exactly, and was really carefully in weighing out the butter. I thought the lemon cream tasted really strange--more like lemony butter. I thought it was delicious when I was cooking it over the double boiler--nice and tart. The butter mellowed it out too much, in my opinion. I'm going to have to use this as a filling for a lemon pound cake or something. I thought it was very average....even taking into consideration that it shouldn't be as tart as lemon curd. I don't think I'll make this again.

The Fine Cooking recipe, on the other hand, was excellent. I actually was looking for something similar to the curd I had in a lemon tart from Dahlia Bakery a few days ago, and this was it! Sharp and tangy, with just the right amount of sweetness. I LOVED THIS! I ate most of the batch already...damn, this was so addictive! :wub:


Edited by Ling (log)

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Ling, you're sooo right. I didn't have trouble with brown flecks, etc. when I recently made PH's lemon tart, but I found the curd WAY too buttery. (Could your pan not be heavy enough? would a flame tamer help? I made my very first curd in a double boiler many years ago - never again. I made the curd in a ss lined 2.5mm copper evasee that can handle my lopsided gas flame with grace.)

I liked the crust, though, so I remade the tart using PH's crust and RLB's curd. It's a bit more lemony that PH's, but still a bit too bland for me, too. I'll try the FC curd you suggest. If that doesn't work, it'll be tweak tweak tweak. (I usually go for some's tried and true as my hips are too curdy as it is.)

edited for typo: my curd didn't make a fist


Edited by Mottmott (log)

"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

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Is the recipe from Fine Cooking enough to fill a 10" tart?

Thanks

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Is the recipe from Fine Cooking enough to fill a 10" tart?

Thanks

Maybe. It depends on how deep you want the curd to be.

Assuming that the internal diameter of the crust-- the volume you want to fill-- is 9.5" (assuming the crust takes up 1/4" of the internal diameter of the 10" pan), and that the FC recipe yields 2 cups of curd (which is about 28.8 cubic inches), your filling will be 0.4" deep. In other words, a cylinder with a volume of 28.8 cubic inches and a radius of 4.75" will have a height of 0.4".


"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Is the recipe from Fine Cooking enough to fill a 10" tart?

Thanks

Maybe. It depends on how deep you want the curd to be.

Assuming that the internal diameter of the crust-- the volume you want to fill-- is 9.5" (assuming the crust takes up 1/4" of the internal diameter of the 10" pan), and that the FC recipe yields 2 cups of curd (which is about 28.8 cubic inches), your filling will be 0.4" deep. In other words, a cylinder with a volume of 28.8 cubic inches and a radius of 4.75" will have a height of 0.4".


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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Is the recipe from Fine Cooking enough to fill a 10" tart?

Thanks

Maybe. It depends on how deep you want the curd to be.

Assuming that the internal diameter of the crust-- the volume you want to fill-- is 9.5" (assuming the crust takes up 1/4" of the internal diameter of the 10" pan), and that the FC recipe yields 2 cups of curd (which is about 28.8 cubic inches), your filling will be 0.4" deep. In other words, a cylinder with a volume of 28.8 cubic inches and a radius of 4.75" will have a height of 0.4".

Your skills are endless Patrick! :wink:

Thanks. I ended up doubling the recipe and it filled just perfectly. I must add that this Fine Cooking recipe lacked body. I don't know why, but I found PH's lemon cream held together much better. Perhaps I will have to add some gelatin next time, unless you guys have another solution.

I must say that I glazed the top with a raspberry glaze with white chocolate stripes. It had the wow factor, but being a perfectionist, I did like the lack of body.

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Thanks.  I ended up doubling the recipe and it filled just perfectly.  I must add that this Fine Cooking recipe lacked body.  I don't know why, but I found PH's lemon cream held together much better.  Perhaps I will have to add some gelatin next time, unless you guys have another solution.

I must say that I glazed the top with a raspberry glaze with white chocolate stripes.  It had the wow factor, but being a perfectionist, I did like the lack of body.

Sounds great -- I love lemon and raspberry (blueberry, too). What did you use for a glaze? Was the white chocolate just tempered white?

Thanks!


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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Thanks.  I ended up doubling the recipe and it filled just perfectly.  I must add that this Fine Cooking recipe lacked body.  I don't know why, but I found PH's lemon cream held together much better.  Perhaps I will have to add some gelatin next time, unless you guys have another solution.

I must say that I glazed the top with a raspberry glaze with white chocolate stripes.  It had the wow factor, but being a perfectionist, I did like the lack of body.

I made the Fine Cooking lemon curd a few years ago, and also found it to be too thin to hold up in a tart. Great taste, but definitely not enough body. After all the accolades, I thought perhaps my results weren't typical - glad you mentioned it.


There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

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