Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

How dressed up do New Yorkers get?


egator
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I’m going with my husband to NYC in the beginning of June. We have reservations at Veritas, Le Bernardin & Babbo (can you tell I’m a Tony fan?). Thanks to all you NYC e-gulleters, I’ve found out plenty about all three. The information has been priceless (and very entertaining).

I still have a question that I was hoping you could help me with. As far as the dress-code/atmosphere at the restaurants, what’s it like? Le Bernardin I have no questions about (formal), but what about the other two? Take us Floridians outta our shorts & flip-flops and we’re lost. :wink:

If you have any other vacationing suggestions, then I’d love to hear them. After visiting last year, I found out that it’s just as hot up there as it is down here during the summer (yeah, that was a painful revelation). Look forward to posting in the future.

Thanks for all your help,

Liz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

oh boy, this might get good.

babbo is certianly the most "casual" of the three. i dont think you can be overdressed at le b or veritas. slacks and a nice shirt at veritas would do the trick. there's no reason to be uncomfortable at dinner.

i'd say that clean jeans and an overall neat and fashionable appearance is appropriate at babbo, if that's what you want to do. otherwise, again, you can't overdress. it's manhattan aferall :wink: . but you'll get 10 opinions from 10 people on what is "correct". obviously there is no such thing in a lot of situations.

edit: excellent choices, btw. you should have some excellent meals.

Edited by tommy (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's hard to be overdressed anywhere in New York, where few people will notice a tuxedoed man at Katz's Deli or Gray's Papaya (I've done both; nobody has batted an eye). So there's really no limit on that end of the spectrum: a man could wear a suit and tie at any of those restaurants and be totally at home, and a woman could wear any kind of semi-formal eveningwear. In terms of how casual you can go, a jacket and tie for a man at Le Bernardin is sufficient, as would be a pants suit or something of that nature for a woman. At Veritas a jacket is not necessary and a woman can do anything more formal than jeans. At Babbo the minimum is more on the order of clean jeans.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Liz,

Welcome to eGullet. I think you will find that nice casual will work in the other two restaurants, although formal is ok too. The best bet is to be "chic", whatever that is.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the welcome & the info. I realized after I posted that I could've just put it in guy talk and simply asked, "I'm going to Veritas, Le B & Babbo. Do I have to wear a suit to all three?"

Thanks. If my husband doesn't have to wear a suit 3 nights in a row, then he will be happy. And hey, if he's happy, then I'm happy! I won't lie, I'm just a casual as he is, so this is good news for me too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A jacket with no tie is perfectly acceptable at Le Bernardin and will not raise an eyebrow.  However, probably two thirds to three quarters of the men will wear ties.

Considering its June as well, the weather will be very warm.

Babbo and Veritas I would do clean jeans or chinos with a sportjacket and nice shirt, no tie.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The weather will be warm, but don't they aircondition the dining rooms in places like Le Bernardin to 60 degrees so that all those suit-wearing men aren't overheated?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The weather will be warm, but don't they aircondition the dining rooms in places like Le Bernardin to 60 degrees so that all those suit-wearing men aren't overheated?

it's getting there that can sometimes get hot. don't you think?

i don't think le b or places like le b are over-airconditioned if that's what you're suggesting. they always seem appropriately airconditioned, and i'd expect nothing less.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The weather will be warm, but don't they aircondition the dining rooms in places like Le Bernardin to 60 degrees so that all those suit-wearing men aren't overheated?

it's getting there that can sometimes get hot. don't you think?

Unless you go by subway. :raz:

Yes, I've sometimes found fine-dining places over-airconditioned, perhaps for the reason I suggested. But I generally find airconditioning in the U.S. to be excessive, anyway. Reduce the temperature to about 70, and that's fine with me.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless you go by subway.  :raz:

there are few hotter places on the planet than most subway stops in NYC. i'll site E stops and 6 stops as examples. and the cars on several of the lines are no picnic for people walking around in humid weather in a jacket. thankfully the shiny new cars on the 6 are very good, except at the end, where the ceiling is low, when they're packed.

you know what they say about the heat and the humidity.

Edited by tommy (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed, some of the platforms are true Hell. I meant the airconditioned cars. But I guess the fact that I seemingly like the thermostat higher than most other Americans should be taken into account. Talk to some singers for views similar to mine about the perils of riding in airconditioned subway cars, though. I always forget to bring a sweater along in July... :raz:

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed, some of the platforms are true Hell. I meant the airconditioned cars. But I guess the fact that I seemingly like the thermostat higher than most other Americans should be taken into account.

and i sweat more than most people. however, it seems obvious that you'll spend a fraction of your time on the car, and more time getting to the car and sometimes waiting. in my experience, a several block walk to a subway, a 7 minute wait on a platform, a 8 minute ride in the car, and a 6 minute walk to a restaurant = big sweaty mess. :shock:

Edited by tommy (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On topic: In NYC, as, say -- Chicago!-- basic black in some permutation for the lady. Slacks (whatever kind) that are clean and maybe even pressed, shirt, blazer for Monsieur. These wardrobe selections will take you anywhere; the jacket can be dispensed with more often than not.

Pearls go with everything.

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last Thursday evening at Per Se, there seemed to be an even split between men wearing ties and men not wearing ties. All the men wore jackets, which I'm sure is required.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you know what they say about the heat and the humidity.

I thought it was: "It's not the heat, it's the stupidity". :wink:

I actually find it easier to be comfortably dressed up during the summer in a lightweight skirt or sleeveless dress than wearing slacks. A lightweight shawl is easy to carry and can ward off chilly conditioned air. My husband will often take a jacket along, just in case, and then get a feel for how most of the men in the restaurant are dressed before deciding whether to wear it or remove it while eating.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, even at Per Se, jackets are "recommended", not required.

Even in New York, there are only a handful of places (Le Cirque, Daniel, Le Bernardin, and the few remaining old school French places) that actually require jackets anymore.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you know what they say about the heat and the humidity.

I thought it was: "It's not the heat, it's the stupidity". :wink:

right again. :laugh:

i suppose there are less jackets, and certainly less ties, at NYC restaurants on Saturday night, as there are less people running around in suits and ties on Saturday in general.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On topic: In NYC, as, say -- Chicago!-- basic black in some permutation for the lady.

This cannot be emphasized enough.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, even at Per Se, jackets are "recommended", not required.

Even in New York, there are only a handful of places (Le Cirque, Daniel, Le Bernardin, and the few remaining old school French places) that actually require jackets anymore.

Yes, I saw a diner at Per Se yesterday without a jacket and several without ties.

I think most places that absolutely require jackets have the dreaded loaner jackets and ties on hand. I was once forced to wear one three sizes too small when I arrived ill-prepared at Lespinasse some years ago.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i'm a big a big believer in the sleeveless black dress in some kind of micorfiber..with pearls, heels and great earrings for le bern same dress with low heels and a pony tail for the others. i know a lot think they are dated but i still love a pastel pashmina with a black dress just in case you need a wrap

Link to comment
Share on other sites

basic black in some permutation for the lady.

This cannot be emphasized enough.

No color. We only wear black. Stilettos, of the OWTD (Only Wear To Dinner) classification. Must have manicure (pale pink) and pedicure (wise choice of color is acceptable). Current facial is also required, we must appear moist, not sweaty. Ponchos are the 'in' wrap. Poncho can be colorful, but none of this summer fur trim unless you are really tall and thin. Legs should be bare and bronzed. One bare shoulder instead of two. :biggrin::raz::laugh: Yes, yes, I'm kidding!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I suppose this thread has already been done to death, but I'm wondering if there are any restaurants left in NYC that absolutely require a tie. There are many where the vast majority of men will be wearing ties, but once they make the exception, it's clearly no longer a requirement. Dress in restaurants, even the fanciest most formal restaurants is getting more casual. This is a trend I've found in Europe as well. I find that if I base my dress on what I remember people wearing a couple of years ago, I'll be over dressed. There are a handful of restaurants at which I'd wear a tie. I suppose le Bernardin is one. I reserve the right to change my mind next time. It also may depend upon who else is with me. The odds are that I'd be unlikely to wear a tie at either Veritas of Babbo, particularly at Babbo.

Robert Buxbaum

WorldTable

Recent WorldTable posts include: comments about reporting on Michelin stars in The NY Times, the NJ proposal to ban foie gras, Michael Ruhlman's comments in blogs about the NJ proposal and Bill Buford's New Yorker article on the Food Network.

My mailbox is full. You may contact me via worldtable.com.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sort of like dressing up for special occasions (perhaps because I'm a musician), so if I go to a fancy place, I usually wear a suit and tie, then depending on the temperature inside the place, may take off the jacket or/and tie when inside.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...