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New Smoker Arriving Tomorrow


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Brooks, The element doesn't come out, but everything else does. The woodbox, the racks, and even the rack slides. It's pretty well thought out. A removeable element would make things a little easier though. Hosing out won't work with a smoker. You're dealing with smoke. And you don't want a perfectly clean inside anyhow. The first thing you do with a new smoker is run it with nothing inside to "season" it. I like to keep the racks clean and that's easy enough. I've got that big sink I put in that Fifi dug. (Where is Fifi? I haven't been around in awhile.).. And there are three racks with rack holders that have two positions. There's room for a big hunk of meat, or a small turkey.

Fifi is safely ensconced by Galveston Bay in her new pad, no doubt plotting ways to torture people who enjoy a few beans in their chili and like this stuff.

Your smoker looks great. I hope that you get some fish soon. I also highly reccomend gettin ahold of some soft shell crabs and better yet, freshly shucked, on the halfshell oysters. Smoke em in the shell, in their liquor with the heat up pretty high (kind of like the crabs) they don't take long and with a little experimentation you have something that will blow you away (my kids like 'em with Crystal Wing Sauce (not much) on top before they go in the smoker).

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Ronnie, It looks like you've got some capacity in that new smoker. Is it wood/charcoal-fired, or electric? I first started smoking with a huge smoker I built that was plain wood-fired, but gave it away when I moved. Then, a few years ago, I got a Brinkman charcoal smoker, but that required constant tending and wouldn't go low enough for fish.

It's actually gas or wood/charcoal depending on preference--it's convertable to either format. I'm going to start out with the gas set-up since my other smoker is strictly wood/charcoal and I'm seeking more fine control over temperature, etc. If the gas set-up isn't to my liking, I'll remove the burner pad and set the unit up as a wood/charcoal unit. Of course, then I'm back to square one...but at least it'll be with a lot more capacity :smile:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Fifi is safely ensconced by Galveston Bay in her new pad, no doubt plotting ways to torture people who enjoy a few beans in their chili and like this stuff.

Your smoker looks great. I hope that you get some fish soon. I also highly reccomend gettin ahold of some soft shell crabs and better yet, freshly shucked, on the halfshell oysters. Smoke em in the shell, in their liquor with the heat up pretty high (kind of like the crabs) they don't take long and with a little experimentation you have something that will blow you away (my kids like 'em with Crystal Wing Sauce (not much) on top before they go in the smoker).

Thanks for the news on Fifi. What is all that stuff on the link? Has she gone vegetarian? :biggrin:

Smoking oysters is something I want to try. I love smoked oysters. I got a seafood rack with this thing. Real fine mesh so nothing falls through. Don't need it for fish, but it'll work great with oysters... and those small Maine shrimp I froze up this winter. Don't know how they'll turn out but I'm going to give it a try after a quick strong brine.

Thanks for the tips on the oysters. Got any ideas on temp, how long, and wood to use? I generally use cherry (with maybe a little apple) for fish.

Man, maybe we'll start a smokin' movement here at Gullet. Backyards, apartment balconies, you name it. That smell of good smoke curling up everywhere. :biggrin:

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Man, maybe we'll start a smokin' movement here at Gullet. Backyards, apartment balconies, you name it. That smell of good smoke curling up everywhere. :biggrin:

I was part of a "smoking movement" for years. :wink::laugh: Pecan, walnut, oak, and the occasional orange wood are all I smoke these days.

I will post some details on the oysters, it is late and I am finally going home. Long day. Thanks to the eGulleteers that kept interupting my exciting day in the alternate universe of Excel. I would have lost it without some occasional diversion.

Brooks Hamaker, aka "Mayhaw Man"

There's a train everyday, leaving either way...

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Ooooohhhhhh..... I want one....

So, this Cookshack electric job, since it is electric, and insulated, do you suppose it would be safe to use on a wood apartment balcony?

Then go get one without fear. I keep my Cookshack on a large wooden deck just off my kitchen. Wood chunks are put in a covered aluminum box that slides over the heating element. You then insert item to be smoked, close front door, and it's sealed. No problem or worry whatsoever.

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an experiment I just performed that you should try:

SMOKE SOME SALT!

It ends up very nice. You can have barbecue flavor without the barbecue.

Another one to try is smokey roux. Trim excess fat from a smoked brisket. Render and make roux as you normally would. Adds great flavor and depth to any roux based dish.

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Here is a pic of my smoker--although mine's stainless...

smoker.3000B.jpg

It's a Smokey Mountain Series 3000 (whatever the heck that means :biggrin:) which I purchased over the winter. 

...

=R=

I bought a similar one at Costco a few weeks ago. Mine is stainless and has the gas burner in place of the charcoal box shown. There's a small cast iron box for wood chips that sits directly avbove the burner.

The starter on the gas burner is the best I've used - it lights on the first "click" every time. The range of temperature control is pretty good, but it's hard to maintain temps below 200, so the super-long smoke may be a problem.

I've had trouble locating a good source for wood chips. I'd love to try cherry or apple but all I can find is mequite.

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I have the Smokin Tex and have been extremely pleased with it! I looked at the Cook Shack model too, but decided on the Smokin Tex because it has more capacity than the Cook Shack and it was less expensive. It comes with casters but I put mine up on a table so it is easy to load and I have work space on the table. They suggest using no more than 8 oz of wood chips, but I found that 4 oz is enough. The neat thing about these is you load your wood chips and meats, secure the door, plug it in, and turn on the thermostat and walk away! You don't have to tend it all day. I put a brisket in at about 11pm, turn it to 180F and go to bed! 12-15 hours later the brisket is ready! Slow cooked ribs in 4-5 hours at 220F, mmm, mmm good! I cooked a pork butt, 2 slabs of ribs and 2 turkey breasts in it for Thanksgiving!

The Smokin Tex has 5 shelves to spead the meat on or you can hang ribs from hooks.

I also use mine to smoke grains for brewing beer. Just bought some alder chips this week to smoke some grains for a Rauch bier!

Check out SmokinTex.com to see their products. They usually run specials around Christmas time. I have been very happy with mine! :smile:

Just checked the website and they are running the special NOW, SmokinTex with cover and rib hooks and free shipping in US.

Edited by Okbrewer (log)

Bob R in OKC

Home Brewer, Beer & Food Lover!

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Fifi is safely ensconced by Galveston Bay in her new pad, no doubt plotting ways to torture people who enjoy a few beans in their chili and like this stuff.

Your smoker looks great. I hope that you get some fish soon. I also highly reccomend gettin ahold of some soft shell crabs and better yet, freshly shucked, on the halfshell oysters. Smoke em in the shell, in their liquor with the heat up pretty high (kind of like the crabs) they don't take long and with a little experimentation you have something that will blow you away (my kids like 'em with Crystal Wing Sauce (not much) on top before they go in the smoker).

Thanks for the news on Fifi. What is all that stuff on the link? Has she gone vegetarian? :biggrin:

Smoking oysters is something I want to try. I love smoked oysters. I got a seafood rack with this thing. Real fine mesh so nothing falls through. Don't need it for fish, but it'll work great with oysters... and those small Maine shrimp I froze up this winter. Don't know how they'll turn out but I'm going to give it a try after a quick strong brine.

Thanks for the tips on the oysters. Got any ideas on temp, how long, and wood to use? I generally use cherry (with maybe a little apple) for fish.

Man, maybe we'll start a smokin' movement here at Gullet. Backyards, apartment balconies, you name it. That smell of good smoke curling up everywhere. :biggrin:

I'm smoking a brisket in my Smokette today and the mention of oysters inspired me to do some as an app. Method I use is a variation of a recipe that (I think) I found in "Smoke & Spice" (Jamison).

Shuck 2 doz. oysters - Reserve bottom shell and liquor. Combine oyster liquor with 1/2 C bottled clam juice, 3 T each freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice, 3 T EVOO, 1 T freshly cracked black pepper, 5 minced garlic cloves and 1 t grated ginger. Put oysters in a resealable plastic bag, pour marinade over oysters, seal and refrigerate 45-60 minutes.

Drain oysters and reserve marinade. Bring marinade to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Place oysters in bottom shell and then put on a small grill rack. Place rack over a disposable aluminum pan containing 12 ice cubes. Brush oysters with marinade and place in smoker. Smoke at 180F for 45 minutes. Remove oysters and brush with additional marinade. Serve as is or with your preferred topping. I normally just go with a couple of dashes of Crystal.

Good woods to use are cherry, apple, or alder. I'm using hickory today because that's all I have left. In a Smokette, 1.5 oz. to 2 oz. is all you'll need.

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