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Do you enjoy cooked fruit? Are there special Indian dishes you make with cooked fruit? What do you like about it?

One of my favorites is -- Khubani Ka Meetha -- Boiled dried apricots cooked in sugar and then pureed and served with dollops of fresh cream

What are some of your favorite dishes?

:wub: Inquiring minds want to know :smile:

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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I've had various Mughal-style dishes with pillau that have raisins and almonds or pistachios in them. I remember getting stuff like that often at Bangles restaurant in Kuala Lumpur in the 70s. Sorry, no recipes. :biggrin:

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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Monica,

Well right now I have about 20 kg of semi raw Totapuri mangos going into their new role as a murabba( semi spicy jam).

I jullienned 1/2 a mango and added it into tonight's onion pulao.

An old ( Satyanarain Puja) favourite is chopped Bananas in Rava Seera/Halva.

Raw papaya makes the famous gujarati farsan chatni. The waiters at one of Vikram's fav restaurant, know me as the guy who orders the papaya chatni with an accompaniment of Fafdas, i.e, more chatni and less of the main stuff :laugh:

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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south indian yummy stuff:

1. mango kalan (kerala style mango cooked in buttermilk,

sweet and hot and tangy)

2. mango pachadi (tamil style ripe mango raita).

3. unripe mangos in lots of dishes.

4. bananas fried in ghee and suger (yummy)

you can sub or add pineapple to any of the above.

also pineapple godju is famous in bangalore..

i'm sure there's more if i think about it,

those just occurred to me.

milagai

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south indian yummy stuff:

Ripe plantain bananas, mangoes, jackfruit, and pineapple are used making various curries as well as desserts in Kerala.

Milagai already mentioed kalan and pachadi made with ripe mangoes. We also make kalan with ripe plantains and pachadi with pineapple.

Ripe plantains are sliced, batter dipped and deep fried. ripe bananas combined with rice flour and brown sugar to make a batter for pancakes Kerala style.

Ripe plantains, jackfruit and mango are cooked with jaggery and ghee to make a homemade jams. These jams are the base ingredients in desserts (pazza pradhman, chakka pradhaman and manga pradhaman) where they are further cooked in coconut milk.

Small ripe bananas are used in making a temple offering Neyyappam. Ripe bananas are mashed and combined with kandasari sugar dates,raisins, sugar candy, cardamom and ghee to make panchamridam, a sweet offered at Subrahmanya temples all over South India. Another temple offering thrimadhuram is made with ripe bananas, raisins and honey.

Mago pulp is combined with jaggery, salt and chili powder to make a dreid preserve called mangathera.

Of course raw plantains and jackfruits are deep fried to make chips - favorite snacks in Kerala.

Ammini Ramachandran

www.Peppertrail.com

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Bhelpuri and I were recently salivating on the Swati Snacks thread for the owner's amazing new dish of a curry made with ripe guavas. Wonderful sweet-tart-spicy taste. Later I was told its an old Jain dish.

Jakfruit is often cooked green because its texture at that time is closest to meat. Its used a mock meat in several recipes where its coyly called Tree-Goat.

Khubani Ka Meetha is like a lovely rich and faintly spicy jam. The ITC Kitchen's Of India range has a canned version which is pretty much the only one in that range I really like. Dried apricots are also used in jerdaloo sali boti, a wonderful Parsi dish cooked with boneless mutton pieces and covered with fried potato straws. Cooking fruits and meats together is something the Parsis have preserved from their Persian traditions.

The Coconut Grove restaurants used to make a totally delicious, rich and unctuous pineapple halwa. A real surprise, since I've always thought the fruit doesn't combine well with other things. Recently I bought a pinepaple murabba which was quite good.

Small ripe bananas are used in making a temple offering Neyyappam. Ripe bananas are mashed and combined with kandasari sugar dates,raisins, sugar candy, cardamom and ghee to make panchamridam, a sweet offered at Subrahmanya temples all over South India. Another temple offering thrimadhuram is made with ripe bananas, raisins and honey.

This reminds me of a great quick dessert snack we used to make in my (Malayali) mother's family called papadam pallam (meaning papads and bananas). After a meal if there was any leftover rice (so maybe I should file this under the leftover rice thread) and some overripe bananas, then the fruit was peeled and mashed into a glutinous pulp. Some of the rice was mashed in (for texture, I'm told) along with some sugar and ghee. Then any leftover papads (this being south India they were fried crisp, not roasted) were crumbled and scattered over the glutinous mixture. And that was it - sweet, fruity, with the papad shards for contrast in texture and totally delicious.

Vikram

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Bhelpuri and I were recently salivating on the Swati Snacks thread for the owner's amazing new dish of a curry made with ripe guavas. Wonderful sweet-tart-spicy taste. Later I was told its an old Jain dish.

I am very interested in cooking with guava, pineapple and other tropical fruits. I searched this Swati Snacks thread but did not find the reference to the curry with ripe guavas of which you speak.

I did, however, find this recipe for an Apple and Guava curry on a site called "www.Jainworld.com". Is that recipe similar at all to what you are describing?

The Coconut Grove restaurants used to make a totally delicious, rich and unctuous pineapple halwa. A real surprise, since I've always thought the fruit doesn't combine well with other things. Recently I bought a pinepaple murabba which was quite good

I also google'd halwa and murabba. Looks like murabba is fruit preserves? Kind of like jam I guess?

And halwa looks like a yummy dish made with cheese, pineapple, (sometimes flour?) I think this is a picture of it in the bottom right corner?

Another favorite of mine - Pineapple rasam.

Should I try this recipe for the pineapple rasam?

-Richie

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Another favorite of mine - Pineapple rasam.

Should I try this recipe for the pineapple rasam?

-Richie

Richie111:

I just checked the recipe for pineapple rasam on the link you had posted. My recipe is a bit different. Somehow I do not like to add garlic with pineapple. But if you enjoy the taste, that is fine. One teaspoon red pepper powder, four green chilies and the chili pepper in the rasam powder are fine for anyone who enjoys spicy hot. If not, you may want to reduce those.

I hope you enjoy pineapple rasam.

Ammini Ramachandran

www.Peppertrail.com

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Jakfruit is often cooked green because its texture at that time is closest to meat. Its used a mock meat in several recipes where its coyly called Tree-Goat.

Tell me about it.

This is the same con my mom used to try to pull when we were kids...to try to get us to eat more veggies :raz:

I didnt, at that time, but now I actually do like green jackfruit! (called "enchor" in Bengali).

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I like eating jackfruit raw.. I remember reading somewhere about rice layered with jackfruit...

The jackfruit you eat raw is a ripe jackfruit.

The jackfruit you make a layered rice dish with is the green jackfruit. Which is actually more like a vegetable than like a fruit. You can make biriyani (is this what you are refering to when you say "layered" rice dish?) with the green jackfruit -- I think Suvir had earlier posted a recipe in this forum, but I am not sure -- you can probably search for it.

Regarding the original topic about indian cooking with fruits -- Bengalis make chutneys with various fruits. Unlike in other parts of india, this chutney is a made from cooking dwon fruits, or some times using cooked down dried fruits, and this chutney is eaten as a separate course on its own, not as an accompaniment.

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What other fruits do folks use?

Custard apple?

Grapes?

Apples?

in bangalore lately there's a very popular trend to

mix fruit into thayir saadam *spiced yogurt rice).

e.g. pomegranate daanas; makes a very festive

red and white dish. tastes very good.

also: grated or finely chopped cucmber, and halved

green grapes. very cool combination popular with kids.

milagai

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/QUOTE]

in bangalore lately there's a very popular trend to

mix fruit into thayir saadam *spiced yogurt rice).

e.g. pomegranate daanas; makes a very festive

red and white dish. tastes very good.

also: grated or finely chopped cucmber, and halved

green grapes. very cool combination popular with kids.

milagai

What do you mean Bangalore? Explain yourself and your location. I thought I'm the only one there.

Of course this means that if you are based there, you will have to invite me home for dinner.

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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Regarding the original topic about indian cooking with fruits -- Bengalis make chutneys with various fruits. Unlike in other parts of india, this chutney is a made from cooking dwon fruits, or some times using cooked down dried fruits, and this chutney is eaten as a separate course on its own, not as an accompaniment.

Bong - I did mean I like ripe jackfruit.... I thought I had written that!

So do tell us a bit more about this.. would love to hear

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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What do you mean Bangalore? Explain yourself and your location. I thought I'm the only one there.

what do *you* mean, "explain yourself and

your location"? that's the whole point

of cyberspace!

:raz:

you can be everywhere / everyperson / anytime.

milagai

(on the internet, no-one knows you're god)

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Went through all your posts and realise that you use 110 volts.

Sigh! No chance of eating your cooking. :sad:

Huh? not talking about electrocuting the food...??? :biggrin:

Can't eat?

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Went through all your posts and realise that you use 110 volts.

Sigh! No chance of eating your cooking. :sad:

Huh? not talking about electrocuting the food...??? :biggrin:

Can't eat?

:smile:

I lament the closeness that we all have here and yet are divided by thousands of miles. :sad:

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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