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slkinsey

The Aviation

221 posts in this topic

I haven't been crazy with the Aviation/Allen when I've tried it before, but I gave it another go today so as to feel somewhat qualified to comment here. I have previously tried the Allen (as Drinkboy's Aviation), then later tried the Blue-less Devil from other sources (4:1:1) but I never cared much for either of them, not being partial to 'funky' flavors such as Maraschino liqueur. Today, though, I gave it another spin, using 3 oz Boodles, generous 1 oz lemon, and 1/4 oz each of Luxardo Maraschino and Violette (this was for 2 drinks). MUCH more pleasant, much better balanced. The funk and florality mitigated each other, and were put in place by the acidity of the lemon and complimented by the vaguely floral nature of the Boodles. It didn't really come out blue (more gray than anything) but whatever. Still not in my top ten, but I now understand what the fuss is about. Too bad most customers out there can't tolerate such a tart drink.

-Andy


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I think for most of us who prefer the Allen-style Aviation...it's not that we don't mind or like tartness...it's that we like the "funk"!

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I, for one, don't like tart drinks.

Nathan, what brand of Maraschino do you use for your 2:1:1 Aviations?

I like the funk just fine, but I find that if I use much more than 1/4 oz. or so of Luxardo Maraschino it overpowers everything else. Others have posted similar opinions. I usually end up reducing the Maraschino in recipes by 1/2.


Edited by David Santucci (log)

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I, for one, don't like tart drinks.

Nathan, what brand of Maraschino do you use for your 2:1:1 Aviations?

I like the funk just fine, but I find that if I use much more than 1/4 oz. or so of Luxardo Maraschino it overpowers everything else. Others have posted similar opinions. I usually end up reducing the Maraschino in recipes by 1/2.

luxardo!

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fwiw, my typical Aviation is 4:1:1, and I might sometimes split the sweet component 2:1 between Luxardo and creme de violette.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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I haven't been crazy with the Aviation/Allen when I've tried it before, but I gave it another go today so as to feel somewhat qualified to comment here. I have previously tried the Allen (as Drinkboy's Aviation), then later tried the Blue-less Devil from other sources (4:1:1) but I never cared much for either of them, not being partial to 'funky' flavors such as Maraschino liqueur. Today, though, I gave it another spin, using 3 oz Boodles, generous 1 oz lemon, and 1/4 oz each of Luxardo Maraschino and Violette (this was for 2 drinks). MUCH more pleasant, much better balanced. The funk and florality mitigated each other, and were put in place by the acidity of the lemon and complimented by the vaguely floral nature of the Boodles. It didn't really come out blue (more gray than anything) but whatever. Still not in my top ten, but I now understand what the fuss is about. Too bad most customers out there can't tolerate such a tart drink.

-Andy

My Aviation is 2 oz beefeater or Tanq, 3/4 oz lemon, 1/2 oz luxardo, 1/4 oz simple (1 to 1). I like to thow a few dashes of orange bitters to make a Casino.


A DUSTY SHAKER LEADS TO A THIRSTY LIFE

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I haven't been crazy with the Aviation/Allen when I've tried it before, but I gave it another go today so as to feel somewhat qualified to comment here. I have previously tried the Allen (as Drinkboy's Aviation), then later tried the Blue-less Devil from other sources (4:1:1) but I never cared much for either of them, not being partial to 'funky' flavors such as Maraschino liqueur. Today, though, I gave it another spin, using 3 oz Boodles, generous 1 oz lemon, and 1/4 oz each of Luxardo Maraschino and Violette (this was for 2 drinks). MUCH more pleasant, much better balanced. The funk and florality mitigated each other, and were put in place by the acidity of the lemon and complimented by the vaguely floral nature of the Boodles. It didn't really come out blue (more gray than anything) but whatever. Still not in my top ten, but I now understand what the fuss is about. Too bad most customers out there can't tolerate such a tart drink.

-Andy

My Aviation is 2 oz beefeater or Tanq, 3/4 oz lemon, 1/2 oz luxardo, 1/4 oz simple (1 to 1). I like to thow a few dashes of orange bitters to make a Casino.

well...that's virtually a 2:1:1 (in fact...that's a little sweeter)...so I'm not alone...

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I use 2oz gin, and one-half oz. each of lemon juice and Luxardo.

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My Aviation is 2 oz beefeater or Tanq, 3/4 oz lemon, 1/2 oz luxardo, 1/4 oz simple (1 to 1).  I like to thow a few dashes of orange bitters to make a Casino.

Hmmm...

I guess the Casino kind of fits into the spectrum as well.

Though, I tend to think of it more as a Gin Cock-tail variant, as it has bitters and only dashes of lemon and maraschino.

It is supposed to use Old-Tom, so I'm not sure about the use of Beefeater's. Tad too sophisticated. I have tried it with Junipero, which is pretty tasty.

2 oz Junipero, 2 dashes maraschino, 2 dashes lemon, 2 dashes orange bitters. Stir, strain. Yum.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I guess instead of saying customers don't want tart drinks I should have instead said that they don't realise they like tart drinks. If I made sour-type drinks at work to my personal taste they would get sent back >50% of the time I'd wager. For me, 1:1 of sweet liqueurs to sour juice is about as sweet as I can really enjoy to the bottom of the drink, but the real reason I prefer less Maraschino in an Aviation is to reign in the funkyness (though it also lightens the drink somewhat; Maraschino is so heavy vs Cointreau or somesuch). So the answer to all your questions, anecdotes, and implicit accusations is "yes" :raz:

-Andy


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I'd hypothesize that the "modern" Aviation has essentially become a showcase for maraschino liqueur....and in that sense is probably closer to an Allen than to the "original" Aviation.

(I'll admit thought that I've enjoyed virtually every Aviation I've ever had...and the proportions used have varied widely.)


Edited by Nathan (log)

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I'd hypothesize that the "modern" Aviation has essentially become a showcase for maraschino liqueur....and in that sense is probably closer to an Allen than to the "original" Aviation.

I also see the Aviation as a really effective "gateway cocktail," in that it's inherent ingredient simplicity can show people maraschino's contributions to a drink. It's so easy to start from there and move someone on to a more complex, but similar in some respect, cocktail like the Last Word.

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I'd hypothesize that the "modern" Aviation has essentially become a showcase for maraschino liqueur....and in that sense is probably closer to an Allen than to the "original" Aviation.

I also see the Aviation as a really effective "gateway cocktail," in that it's inherent ingredient simplicity can show people maraschino's contributions to a drink. It's so easy to start from there and move someone on to a more complex, but similar in some respect, cocktail like the Last Word.

yup...it was the Aviation that first turned me on to serious cocktails. it's kind of remained a "first love"...

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I finally found Maraschino liqueur (Luxardo, even) in a local liquor store. We made two versions of the Aviation – 4:1:1 and 2:1:1. My favorite probably lies somewhere in between. Clearly, further research will be required. I appreciate all of the information on this thread.

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so I revised this with some, ahem, experimentation this weekend.

I'd say my preferred is 2 gin, .5-75 Luxardo, .25 violette, and .5-.75 lemon juice.

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I also see the Aviation as a really effective "gateway cocktail," in that it's inherent ingredient simplicity can show people maraschino's contributions to a drink.  It's so easy to start from there and move someone on to a more complex, but similar in some respect, cocktail like the Last Word.

While this may be true for some people, I personally found the funkiness of the maraschino off-putting. I still prefer the Last Word to Aviation as it is balanced by the Chartreuse.

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My Aviation is 2 oz beefeater or Tanq, 3/4 oz lemon, 1/2 oz luxardo, 1/4 oz simple (1 to 1).  I like to thow a few dashes of orange bitters to make a Casino.

Mrs. C loved this version (minus the orange bitters, which we don’t have). I like fairly tart drinks, so the 3:1:1 version with a small spoonful of simple syrup made from "sugar in the raw" is my favorite so far.

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I've enjoyed two different versions of the Aviation since finally finding some Luxardo maraschino locally. The 4:1:1 went over well with me and my guests a few nights ago, but I preferred a 3:1:1 ratio for myself. Tart drinks are a great thing IMO, especially in the summer. That said, either one is a great cocktail, and will doubtless be served many times at my house in the future.


Tim

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Well, this is the way I like it:

2½ shots gin

1½ shots lemon juice

½ shot maraschino (I use Maraska)

1 spoon crème de violette

where a shot is 25 ml.

Gives a tart yet rounded drink, with a good whack of gin. A few of these and you know about it...

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Of all the variations I've had over these past few months, my favorite so far stems from the recommendation of Robert Hess, to use the brandy soaked cherries in lieu of the marascino liqueur. There's slighty more Violette here for balance in the aromatics. Robert was right about the challenge with finding true brandy-soaked cherries.

2 oz. Gin

1/2 oz. Lemon Juice

1/2 oz. Crème de Violette

1 brandy-soaked cherry

shake with ice, strain into a cocktail glass. gently press dry the cherry before garnish (unless you like the brandy taste).

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eas, I think there needs to be maraschino in there for that to be an Aviation. The ur-Aviation did contain some crème de violette, but I think the primary modifier was still maraschino.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Of all the variations I've had over these past few months, my favorite so far stems from the recommendation of Robert Hess, to use the brandy soaked cherries in lieu of the marascino liqueur.  There's slighty more Violette here for balance in the aromatics.  Robert was right about the challenge with finding true brandy-soaked cherries.

2 oz. Gin

1/2 oz. Lemon Juice

1/2 oz. Crème de Violette

1 brandy-soaked cherry

shake with ice, strain into a cocktail glass. gently press dry the cherry before garnish (unless you like the brandy taste).

This looks like a wonderful drink and I'll try it...but it needs a name.

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eas, I think there needs to be maraschino in there for that to be an Aviation.  The ur-Aviation did contain some crème de violette, but I think the primary modifier was still maraschino.

Maraschino liqueur or the marascino cherry? Robert's last line from his piece in the Spirit World was "If you can find true brandy soaked cherries, I always recommend going that route instead of using the modern maraschino cherry. Another option is to buy dried bing cherries, and reconstitute them in brandy."

So if not Aviation, maybe call it a "Skyline".

...http://www.oldenburgvanbruggen.com/spoonbridge.htm (sorry, couldn't resist)

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I think he was suggesting adding a real brandy cherry as a garnish, but the recipe he posted still has maraschino liquor in it, as seen here.

I personally never garnish an aviation, but if it did want/need a garnish, a true maraschino cherry (like the great luxardo brand) would be a good fit.

john


John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2

--

I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

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eas, I think there needs to be maraschino in there for that to be an Aviation.  The ur-Aviation did contain some crème de violette, but I think the primary modifier was still maraschino.

Maraschino liqueur or the marascino cherry? Robert's last line from his piece in the Spirit World was "If you can find true brandy soaked cherries, I always recommend going that route instead of using the modern maraschino cherry. Another option is to buy dried bing cherries, and reconstitute them in brandy."

So if not Aviation, maybe call it a "Skyline".

...http://www.oldenburgvanbruggen.com/spoonbridge.htm (sorry, couldn't resist)

he's talking about the garnish....not the ingredients!

now that I think about it...what you're drinking is actually a Blue Moon....(well, the original used Creme Yvette but Violette was often substituted...as with the Avation)

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