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Cocktails Rarely Found in the U.S.


Joe Blowe
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I love the idea of using bitters with campari...adding another layer! I'll have to give that a try!

I also enjoy Punt e Mes very much---this is another variation based on ChamPino;

feel free to play with the proportions---I make it this way because I like vermouth, but you could

also do 50-50 proportions with nice results :

Punt e Mes Fizz

3/4 oz Punt e Mes

1 1/2 oz Sweet Vermouth

3 oz champagne

Garnish: Lemon twist (or orange, if preferred)

Shake punt e mes and sweet vermouth with ice. Strain into

a chilled martini glass and top with champagne.

And a variation of the sidecar:

Tantris Sidecar

1 oz Courvoisier VS Cognac

1/2 oz Busnel Calvados (or other good quality)

1/2 oz Cointreau

1/2 oz Fresh Lemon Juice

1/2 oz Simple Syrup (1-1)

1/4 oz Pineapple Juice

1/4 oz Green Chartreuse

Garnish: Lemon Twist

Sugar half the rim on a martini glass. Measure all ingredients into a mixing

glass, add ice, shake well, and strain into martini glass. Garnish with a big

lemon twist.

Enjoy!

Audrey

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The luscious summer afternoon drink (click to go to thread) which I thought was an Americano served at my tati Francoise's house one summer turned out to be a take on the negrito, I find out, but it was still pretty good and incorporates campari and gin.

I have just poured myself the recipe for the Americano on the back of my Campari bottle (1/2 camapri, 1/2 martini red) and it tastes pretty good while nibbling on a few cold cuts. I don't think I'd have one without something to eat though. :rolleyes:

Edited by bleudauvergne (log)
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I cannot believe I did not have my camera. But we were out having a drink with friends on a terrace after work on Friday. And as the sun set we saw down the way, these girls walking along, very shaprely girls in skin tight red plastic pants, and with very high spiked heels, tight white tee shirts, and with big huge red tanks with "Campari" on them. They were working their way down the street, giving anyone who called them over, tastes of Campari. They had little ice buckets attached to their belts, and reached down with tongs and put one in a little cup. Then they dispensed the campari and topped it off with grapefruit juice. It's the best way I've ever tasted Campari. Delicious. There was also a guy dressed in red who was following them, just in case anyone started to give them trouble. And they gave out little recipe booklets. :rolleyes:

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  • 3 weeks later...

For me there is one cocktail that is rarely found in the US that I can't live without. From the French West Indies a petit punch, or ti punch, is the perfect aperitif.

Proportions vary according to taste, but basically

a little sugar cane syrup in the bottom of the glass,

a zest of lime, I use a small section that includes some of the pulp,

a measure of white rhum agricole, rhum distilled from sugar cane juice,

When served in Martinique and Guadeloupe, most bars add only a little ice, but I prefer a couple of cubes and a little crushed ice which not only cools the drink faster but also dilutes the 100 proof spirit.

It is easy to use too much sugar cane syrup so be careful.

And before you ask where you can buy sugar cane syrup, I can't tell you expect in some of the better stores in large cities in places like New York.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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For me there is one cocktail that is rarely found in the US that I can't live without. From the French West Indies a petit punch, or ti punch, is the perfect aperitif.

Proportions vary according to taste, but basically

a little sugar cane syrup in the bottom of the glass,

a zest of lime, I use a small section that includes some of the pulp,

a measure of white rhum agricole, rhum distilled from sugar cane juice,

I've had/made this drink in Jamaica usinng Wray and Nephew overproof rum. Always thought of it as a mint-less mojito. I agree with the use of crushed ice, especially if you happen to be near the equator while drinking.

You shouldn't eat grouse and woodcock, venison, a quail and dove pate, abalone and oysters, caviar, calf sweetbreads, kidneys, liver, and ducks all during the same week with several cases of wine. That's a health tip.

Jim Harrison from "Off to the Side"

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While the ingredients may sound familiar there is a huge difference between Jamaican overproof, distilled to about 94% from a molasses wash and rhum agricole distilled to about 72% alcohol from a wash of sugar cane juice.

The French Caribbean Rhum is much more flavorful and aromatic but the French Caribbean spirit is only 100 proof.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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Audrey thank you for the Tantris Sidecar recipe. Brilliant. I have a bar in which i can order whatever I want and I got in a case of chartreuse and didn't know quite what to do with it - was actually on here straining for recipes - I'd been making an ok martini with citadelle gin, contreau and chartreuse - but I just made yours and it's dynamite - similar to my champange cocktail with grand marnier and hennessy xo.

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I've been making lots of Ti Punches lately and I must say that really juicy limes and lots of Sirop de Canne (also called Sirop Antellais) is key to this drink, in addition to the White Rhum Agricole. For some reason I seem to like it with more Sirop de Canne than most. Maybe its because I am pouring some pretty stiff glasses.

I have one bottle of Niesson white, after that's gone I'm not sure what the hell I am going to do. I guess I could TRY it with the Wray and Nephew Overproof, but it won't be the same.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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When we are in Italy we often drink a cocktail made with Aperol--which is a somewhat Campari-like beverage with a lovely canteloupe orange color. Mix one part Aperol, one part sparkling water and one part white wine, pour over ice, wedge of lemon or lime squeezed in.

Our friend that introduced it to us called it a Bicicletta, although I don't know if that is an accepted name for it. Wonderfully refreshing summer cocktail.

Fred Bramhall

A professor is one who talk's in someone else's sleep

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  • 5 years later...

Pimm's Cup! Great stuff, never see it in the bars I go to. Maybe I go to the wrong bars. Or maybe it is a pain to keep fresh cucmber slices around.

What exactly is "Pimms Cup"? I had one last week when I was in Williamsburg, VA, and it was 90 degrees outside. It was really pleasant and refreshing. Where can you find the Pimms Cup itself? Better liquor stores?

"Life itself is the proper binge" Julia Child

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From CocktailDB (with ginger ale): Pimm's Cup

From About (with lemonade & cucumber): Pimms Cup

Pimm's #1 is pretty commonly available. It is a low-proof liqueur based on gin and herbs.

I recently bought a bottle and made a fantastic drink, which alas I didn't write down. It contained equal parts Pimm's and Campari. I *think* it had an equal part of Lemon and one of gin, but I'm not sure. I have to remake it soon, as it was delightful (if you like Campari). <kicking myself for not jotting it down>

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Argh. If only I could edit.

Bitter Englishman #1

1 oz Gin

1 oz Campari

1 oz Pimm's #1

1/2 oz Lemon

Good; just what you'd expect; gin shines through.

Bitter Englishman #2

1 oz Campari

1 oz Pimm's #1

1 oz Grapefruit

Delicious; quick drinking; fairly low alcohol (for better or worse). I'm pretty sure this must be what I made originally and couldn't remember.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Other Japanese bar staples:

Shochu oyuwari: Shochu and hot water (great on rainy nights)

Gin and Lime: like a Rickey, minus soda

Spumoni: Campari, grapefruit, tonic

XYZ: Light rum, triple sec, lime

Balalaika: Vodka, triple sec, lime

Nikolaschka: Brandy, lemon slice, sugar (piled in a little heap on the lemon)

And damn, don't they love their White Ladys there too.

Pip Hanson | Marvel Bar

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From CocktailDB (with ginger ale): Pimm's Cup

From About (with lemonade & cucumber): Pimms Cup

Pimm's #1 is pretty commonly available. It is a low-proof liqueur based on gin and herbs.

I recently bought a bottle and made a fantastic drink, which alas I didn't write down. It contained equal parts Pimm's and Campari. I *think* it had an equal part of Lemon and one of gin, but I'm not sure. I have to remake it soon, as it was delightful (if you like Campari). <kicking myself for not jotting it down>

That sounds delicious! Please let me know when you try it again - I'd love the recipe!

"Life itself is the proper binge" Julia Child

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We had Pimms served on the terrace after our wedding. It was all jolly civilised and just the thing after standing around in the heat wearing wedding atire.

Has anyone come accross any Pimms other than #1? Im fairly sure that there are several others around, but they seem to be rare. I vaguely recall seeing a #5 over the Christmas period.....

Edited by Mr Pie (log)

if food be the music of love, eat on.

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Pimm's "Winter" (aka No. 3) is done with brandy and spice, I think. I keep meaning to get some during the holiday season. There's also a vodka-based variant -- Pimm's No. 6.

I don't think either is officially available outside of the UK, but of course the internet will provide.

Edited by John Rosevear (log)

John Rosevear

"Brown food tastes better." - Chris Schlesinger

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