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Bone Marrow


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Tiny pouches of brioche stuffed with bits of bone marrrow, grated horseradish and snipped chives and baked until golden brown and puffed -----a wonderful accompaniment to a pot au feu or to serve with drinks.

Makes 15

3/4 pound brioche doubh

3 3-inch marrow bones

1 1/2 tablespoons grated fresh horseradish

salt and pepper

egg glaze for the brioche

Divide doubh into 15 equal pieces, each the size of a walnut. Pat into 1 1/2 inch rounds. Curve each into a small cup and drop in a seasoned marrow cube.Close up, let rise for 30 minutes, glaze and bake in a 375 oven for 8 to 10 minutes. Serve hot.

from Pleasures of Cooking Vol 11 No 4, 1979

Brioche and its many uses by Paula Wolfert

This is probably a silly question but here goes anyway...

How does one get from "3 3-inch marrow bones" to "seasoned marrow cubes"?

Thanks!

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Prairie folk called marrow Injun Butter, as did my gramps and daddy. I love it exactly as pictured, except for a good char on the bones. Also, try cilantro for parsley sometime. It makes a good counterbalance to the unctious nature of the marrow.

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In fact, archaeologists  point out that our ancestors were busy cracking the bones of animals and each other to get at the marrow.

Marrow bone seems to have been a riskier meal back in those days. According to the Norse myths, Thjalfi the giant was enslaved by the god Thor for cracking open the leg bones of his magic goats to eat the marrow.

Glad I don't have to worry about then when I go to St John.

Click.

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In fact, archaeologists  point out that our ancestors were busy cracking the bones of animals and each other to get at the marrow.

Marrow bone seems to have been a riskier meal back in those days. According to the Norse myths, Thjalfi the giant was enslaved by the god Thor for cracking open the leg bones of his magic goats to eat the marrow.

Glad I don't have to worry about then when I go to St John.

Click.

Which potentially was slightly harsh, as Thor would eat his goats and they would magically come back to life again right?

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henderson's technique (which i just tested) worked great and it couldn't be simpler: roast the bone at 450 degrees for about 20 minutes, until the marrow is jellied under the browned cap. that's it. the salad is just chopped parsley and capers.

OK, I'm going to risk sounding stupid here, but never mind.....how exactly does one go about checking that the marrow is jellied under the browned cap? I'm making this next week and don't want to mess up. Or is it fairly obvious?

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it will be fairly obvious. the cap is very thin and you will notice pretty easily that the marrow has turned from hard, almost calcium-like in appearance, to a jelly that wiggles when it is moved.

Excellent. Thank you very much Russ. Can't wait to do this, the dish at St. John has long been a favorite.

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Tiny pouches of brioche stuffed with bits of bone marrrow, grated horseradish and snipped chives and baked until golden brown and puffed -----a wonderful accompaniment to a pot au feu or to serve with drinks.

Makes 15

3/4 pound brioche doubh

3 3-inch marrow bones

1 1/2 tablespoons grated fresh horseradish

salt and pepper

egg glaze for the brioche

Divide doubh into 15 equal pieces, each the size of a walnut. Pat into 1 1/2 inch rounds. Curve each into a small cup and drop in a seasoned marrow cube.Close up, let rise for 30 minutes, glaze and bake in a 375 oven for 8 to 10 minutes. Serve hot.

from  Pleasures of Cooking Vol 11 No 4, 1979

Brioche and its many uses  by Paula Wolfert

This is probably a silly question but here goes anyway...

How does one get from "3 3-inch marrow bones" to "seasoned marrow cubes"?

Thanks!

I'm sorry.

Have the butcher saw the marrow bones for you.

Wash the bones under running water; place in a bowl, cover with warm water, and let soak 2 to 3 minutes. Drain. Using a skewer, loosen the marrow from the bone. Push the marrow out in whole pieces and drop them in to a bowl of cold salted water. Let stand overnight in the refrigerator. This will allow the marrow to rid itself of any blood.

Drain the marrow; divide into 3/8 inch cubes, toss the cubes with horseradish, snipped chives and black pepper. and fill the dough as I described above.

“C’est dans les vieux pots, qu’on fait la bonne soupe!”, or ‘it is in old pots that good soup is made’.

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Which potentially was slightly harsh, as Thor would eat his goats and they would magically come back to life again right?

I think the (warped) logic is that the Lazarus-goats work fine unless their bones are broken, in which case they come to life again with a broken leg. Who writes these things? At least with the classical stuff you can blame Homer or Ovid... :wink:

The other thing I like about this thread is the Google ads its brings up - my ads are all for medical sites providing info about bone marrow, aneamia etc - if only they knew...

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