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Courvoisier


bloviatrix
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The other day I was on a subway car plastered with ads for Courvoisier. Some had the words "Fine Champagne" on them. I would love for someone to explain how that term relates to cognac. I'm perplexed.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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The other day I was on a subway car plastered with ads for Courvoisier.  Some had the words "Fine Champagne" on them.  I would love for someone to explain how that term relates to cognac.  I'm perplexed.

My Guide for the Perplexed:

Perhaps they wanted to come up with some type of alcohol metaphor? :laugh:

and make it appear even more spectacular than it is, bubble-wise?? :hmmm:

Reality check time click on "Quality Portfolio" ...

Edited by Gifted Gourmet (log)

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Hello all.

The matter is simple. In Cognac there are six recognised sub-zones, in descending order of quality (and actually in ascending order of distance from the centre of the region too):

Grande Champagne

Petite Champagne

Borderies

Fins Bois

Bons Bois

Bois Ordinaires

Cognac blend coming from both Grande Champagne and Petite Champagne can be labeled as Fine Champagne, although it isn't a sub-region in itself.

No relationship with sparklers, then. :smile:

Alberto

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Also the word "champagne" itself actually comes from the soil type called campanien. It is a chalky, fossel rich soil and both the Champagne regions of Cognac and the famous sparking wine region Champagne itself feature this type of soil and hence share the name champagne.

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Thanks for giving me some clarity.

Gifted -- I actually looked at the Courvoisier site before I posted and their explanation made no sense to me.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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