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Wow!!

Those are some good eats... Gulab jamuns and Jalebis...

While there is nothing to beat original GJs made in Delhi / UP / Punjab etc., here in the US, after trying various packets / cans etc, the best ones still come out of Gits powder.

We had to experiment and vary the recipe a bit to get better results but they come pretty close to the ones we enjoyed in Delhi halwai shops.

The trick is to make the dough using milk instead of water and we tend to make them real big, we typically make about 9 or 10 per packet, and fry them on medium heat till they are dark brown.

Kids love them..

My family does not have the patience like Mongo to wait 2 -3 years and eat 'em back in India.

Mongo, Try them again..

Have you tried the Amul Gulab Jamun, they taste very similar to what you get in India.

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What is your favorite "Soul Food" and Why??

Even though dictionary.com defines soul food as food eaten by Southern African Americans, but to me the definition is more deep and global. It is essentially one's favourite food that you typically grow with and that will do one or more of the following:

- Food that will cheer you up, when you are feeling down!!

- Food that you can always eat (some) whether hungry or not!!

- Food that reminds you of some "good old times"

- Food that will satisfy you to the very core (In Hindi we say "Aatma prasann ho gayi")

Please share the details, recipes, pics etc, so that other members can try and learn.

I'll start wil mine:

1. Most savoury snack dishes made from Besan (Chana Dal flour) like besan cheelas (pancakes), pakoras (fritters), besan missi roti, and dhokla.

This is not to say that the other foods that I eat are not satisfying but the ones above are always more satisfying than the others.

Give me these any time and I am a happy camper.

Cheers!

- Food that will cheer you up, when you are feeling down!!

- Food that you can always eat (some) whether hungry or not!!

- Food that reminds you of some "good old times"

- Food that will satisfy you to the very core (In Hindi we say "Aatma prasann ho gayi")

One panacea for all ---CHOCOLATE!

Pure, raw, no raisins, no nuts, no nuthin, only the plain dark brown stuff! I buy the raw material.

Goes well with anything-Malt, Cognac, Cigars,Wo..........

Has Phytochemicals, Antioxidants, Phenylethlamines,

-->Dark chocolate 50g =300 mg Polyphenols (natural antioxidants)

-->Green Tea 240 ml =400 mg Polyphenols

-->Wine 140 ml =170 mg Polyphenols

Come to think about it, I'm prepared to believe any lies about it.

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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- Any Bombay street food : Bhelpuri, dahi batata puri, pani puri, ragda pattice, pav bhaji, pav vada....This is only a very small list but if I continue, I'm gonna be seriously depressed :sad:

:sad::sad::sad::sad::sad:

I miss Bombay

It is Mumbai my dear :smile: Get used to it.

anil

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Soul food of the Punjs

Aloo Methi, Foolkas with asli Ghee and a glass of Namkeen Lassi.

In winter, maaki-di-roti and Sarsoon-da-Saag.

Also in Winter, Mooli-di-rooti and Dahi.

Raajma Chaawal (any night )

Mutton Rogan Josh, tandoori roti, Mukke-de-piyaz and Patiala Peg or two sitting on a Charpai in the backyard :biggrin:

anil

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Soul food of the Punjs

Aloo Methi, Foolkas with asli Ghee and a glass of Namkeen Lassi.

In winter, maaki-di-roti and Sarsoon-da-Saag.

Also in Winter, Mooli-di-rooti and Dahi.

Raajma Chaawal (any night )

Mutton Rogan Josh, tandoori roti, Mukke-de-piyaz and Patiala Peg or two sitting on a Charpai in the backyard :biggrin:

Anil,

These are great soul foods.

I will add however, the Kaali daal (Slow cooked Maa & Rajma) from the local tandoor wala and maaro a desi ghee/pyaaz tarka on that and take that as an accompaniment with the Patiala peg.

Cheers!!!

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- Any Bombay street food : Bhelpuri, dahi batata puri, pani puri, ragda pattice, pav bhaji, pav vada....This is only a very small list but if I continue, I'm gonna be seriously depressed :sad:

:sad::sad::sad::sad::sad:

I miss Bombay

It is Mumbai my dear :smile: Get used to it.

NO WAY !!! :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

NO WAY IS RIGHT

I love Bombay I loved Bombay and I will always love BOMBAY...

Mumbai for those who want the politically and geographically correct name :laugh::laugh:

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Fried Fish (esp. the one my Mom makes)

recipe please.. I love fried fish..

Since Suman has not yet replied, may I share My Mom’s fried fish recipe (it's simple & yum). I made it yesterday.

½ kg white fish

1 tsp chilli pd

½ tsp turmeric powder

salt to taste

4 cloves garlic crushed

1” piece ginger crushed

3 green chillies crushed

2 Tbsps vinegar

2 Tbsps flour or besan or semolina for a crunchier version

oil for frying

Mix all spices. Add a few drops of water if needed. Coat fish with this masala. Shallow fry till browned. Serve with an onion salad (onion+limejuice)

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- Any Bombay street food : Bhelpuri, dahi batata puri, pani puri, ragda pattice, pav bhaji, pav vada....This is only a very small list but if I continue, I'm gonna be seriously depressed :sad:

:sad::sad::sad::sad::sad:

I miss Bombay

It is Mumbai my dear :smile: Get used to it.

NO WAY !!! :biggrin::biggrin::biggrin:

NO WAY IS RIGHT

I love Bombay I loved Bombay and I will always love BOMBAY...

Mumbai for those who want the politically and geographically correct name :laugh::laugh:

Slowly whisper mumbai, then increase the tempo and pitch. The word will grow on you. You'll get used to it.

There was a time (before you'll were even born :smile: ) the edge of the metroarea was Juhu and my grandaunt's house was surrounded by koliwadi fisherfolks who always called it Mumba -- BTW, Dev Anand's bungalow was considered the end of Mumbai a.k.a. Bombay. There was only one airport and it was called "SantaCruz Aerodrome" and "bhelpuri in a thonga" was 10paise in Juhubeach.

Edited by anil (log)

anil

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mine:

venn pongal (SI party version of khichdi type thing) with godju (sweet and sour)

tomato rasam and thayir saadam (tomato soup and yogurt rice)

with lemon and mango-ginger pickle - best sick food ever.

sprouted moong salad, with lots of additional things chopped into it

potato chips (though now i've discovered sweet potato chips i'm rapidly

getting addicted to those) and raw banana chips.

milagai

(is there a nostalgia emoticon?)

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I agree that it can't really qualify as true "soul food" if you have to make it for yourself!

My dad's fried chicken : Sadly he won't make it anymore due to it being "bad for you." His was especially good cold the next morning.

My mom's mashed potatoes : She has a knack, pure and simple.

Aloo Gobi : yummy, yummy califlower, potatoes and peas in a yummy sauce. This was my first introduction to Indian food and it remains one of my favorite dishes.

Bun Xao : Vietnamese noodles with cilantro, carrots, sprouts, in a savory broth sometimes with chicken and sometimes with shrimp. This is what I want whenever I am sick. I really wish I could learn to make it. My broth never turns out like the insanely good broth at Cha Gio.

My ex-boyfriends noodle soup with egg : I end up with scrambled eggs in broth everytime. He had a knack for swirling the eggs so it ended up in lovely thin tender strands and ribbons. But since this was virtually his only good quality I have had to do without it!

Fresh bread : It's a weakness. And really ANY kid will do. Naan, yeast breads, quick bread, pita bread, sourdough... I have to stop now or I'll be baking for days!

The stars above me are not real, they are the sparks from smitting steel - Michael Penn

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I'm not Indian, but I would consider Indian foods to rank pretty high as soul or comfort foods. I'm especially fond of coriander chutney and lime or lemon pickle, lamb seekh kabob, and the smell of Basmati rice is enough to make me swoon. I also enjoy the M word, although I hear we don't have any good varieties here in the U.S. (this from a Jamaican friend who had a mango grove in her backyard in the W.I.).

I have no idea what most of the items are that you are naming in this thread, but I am eager to learn :) Most of the Indian restaurants in Baltimore tend to serve tandoori this and tandoori that, but I did find one with some South Indian specialties and tried idli and sambar for the first time not long ago.

(As far as favorite soul food from my ethnic background goes, barszcz and pierogis top my list.)

Kathy

Minxeats
http://www.foodloversguidetobaltimore.com/'>Food Lovers' Guide to Baltimore

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I'm not Indian, but I would consider Indian foods to rank pretty high as soul or comfort foods.  I'm especially fond of coriander chutney and lime or lemon pickle, lamb seekh kabob, and the smell of Basmati rice is enough to make me swoon.  I also enjoy the M word, although I hear we don't have any good varieties here in the U.S. (this from a Jamaican friend who had a mango grove in her backyard in the W.I.).

I have no idea what most of the items are that you are naming in this thread, but I am eager to learn :)  Most of the Indian restaurants in Baltimore tend to serve tandoori this and tandoori that, but I did find one with some South Indian specialties and tried idli and sambar for the first time not long ago. 

(As far as favorite soul food from my ethnic background goes, barszcz and pierogis top my list.)

Kathy - Welcome to the India forum. Delighted to have you here. i hope that you will ask us many questions to make sure we clarify the dishes we are talking about! :biggrin:

We are both M word fans!!!!

(LOVE your jewelry collection btw)

Welcome!

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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Fresh bread : It's a weakness. And really ANY kid will do. Naan, yeast breads, quick bread, pita bread, sourdough... I have to stop now or I'll be baking for days!

Hey my kind of person! Welcome to the India forum!!!

I am just getting my schedule out for the Fall cooking classes and realized that I dont have breads on the list.. hmm.. food for thought.. I need to go fix that!

Welcome and I hope that we will see a lot more from you :smile:

Monica Bhide

A Life of Spice

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ps:  the main thing about soul food is that SOMEONE ELSE makes it

for you.

the comfort level drops if you have to slave over a stove yourself.....

milagai

I disagree. How about the comfort involved in preparing the food?

As much as I enjoy being cooked for, I would never trade in the comfort I receive from smelling onions as they hit sizzling hot fat.

As far as my comfort foods are concerned, anything with gravy. Some people chant, others meditate, I eat gravy and it brings me inner peace.

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(As far as favorite soul food from my ethnic background goes, barszcz and pierogis top my list.)

I know pierogis but what's a barz..bars..barc...barz... Well you know what I mean.

What on earth is it, I have to know. Please tell.

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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Slowly whisper mumbai, then increase the tempo and pitch. The word will grow on you. You'll get used to it.

Oddly enough, while Mumbai still annoys me at some subliminal level, I quite like being a Mumbaikar. It somehow seems a more authentic word than the rather effete Bombayite.

Soul food... bit difficult, since my mother has always hated cooking (while paradoxically being quite a good cook). So I don't have the major childhood memories of her cooking which are, I think, the genesis of soul food. There was a succession of cooks who made different things, with different levels of skill, but nothing much stuck.

Until Vijayan appeared in our lives and has since stuck on and is still going strong. His food is very good, his onion sambhar in particular is outstanding, but the one thing he makes which belongs in some category of his own is his prawn pickle. Its a north Kerala pickle, made with small prawns and tons of chillies, so its pretty explosive, and yet somehow the prawn taste holds its own and the whole is incredibly savoury.

I long ago figured the best way to eat it is on bread with tomato slices on it to cut the heat a bit. Its wonderful, but dangerous stuff to eat - it lures you to eat more, and then do you regret it the next morning! What's interesting is not just how the family likes it, but how the in laws do too. My mother has two sisters and both their husbands demand prawn pickle when their wives visit home.

My sister's husband tends to be blasé, but he's from north Kerala so its nothing new for him. But some years back I introduced the boyfriend to it. He was wary at first - to his Haryanvi upbringing, meat pickles are something incredibly strange. But when he tried it, he fell for it completely. These days when I return home from Madras, I have to ration out the supply carefully, or he'd eat it all and be moaning for days.

Vikram

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(As far as favorite soul food from my ethnic background goes, barszcz and pierogis top my list.)  Kathy - Welcome to the India forum. Delighted to have you here. i hope that you will ask us many questions to make sure we clarify the dishes we are talking about!  :biggrin:

We are both M word fans!!!!

(LOVE your jewelry collection btw)

Welcome!

Thanks, Monica :biggrin: Discounts for eGulleteers, and I do custom work as well!

Episure, barszcz is not only worth a lot of points in Scrabble, it's also the Polish name for borscht, or red beet soup. My grandmother used to make it the hard way, peeling and julienne-ing the beets while they were still raw (so she ended up with pink gloves for a few days). Wish I had gotten the recipe from her. All I remember is that there were always pork shreds in the soup, so she must have thrown the beets and a chunk of pork in a pot with water, LOTS of peppercorns, a bay leaf or two. Simmer for a long time, until pork is tender and broth is a lovely shade of magenta. Salt and vinegar were in there as well, and a dollop of sour cream was an optional garnish. We always ate it piping hot, whereas I think Russians eat beet borscht chilled.

sigh. Wish my husband liked beets, so I could justify an attempt.

Kathy

Minxeats
http://www.foodloversguidetobaltimore.com/'>Food Lovers' Guide to Baltimore

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