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I remember spoon rings, too--Towle Silversmiths, in Newburyport, MA, used to make them. Others may have too, but that's where I know them from.

Wow, thanks. They lived in Boston and Hopkinton MA, so maybe that's where it's from. I should get it checked out.

Heather Johnson

In Good Thyme

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I've been thinking of making some seed pictures to use in my kitchen. So far, I've settled on basswood for a background, drawing my designs, and gluing the seeds in sections. There's so many talented people here that I want youall's thoughts about the way to go about it. I don't really care for a hotglue gun, because I end up with those danged strings everywhere. And once they are finished, I wanted to fill the cracks and spaces as you would with a mosaic. Any thoughts, dear folks?

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I've been thinking of making some seed pictures to use in my kitchen. So far, I've settled on basswood for a background, drawing my designs, and gluing the seeds in sections. There's so many talented people here that I want youall's thoughts about the way to go about it. I don't really care for a hotglue gun, because I end up with those danged strings everywhere. And once they are finished, I wanted to fill the cracks and spaces as you would with a mosaic. Any thoughts, dear folks?

There is a spray-on clear adhesive that you can use - make a mask out of a sheet of acrilic (also available at the art store) so you limit the spray to the area of your design.

Seeds, paper and other lightweight things will stick to it and when you have your design finished you can fill in around it. Work in small sections, the adhesive stays tacky for some time so that you can reposition anything that is out of place.

There is also a paint-on acrilic gesso that can be used and which can be tinted to make the background color you want. Again, plan your design and work in small sections, adding the gesso to the background as you proceed. This is used by artists who make pictures using mixed media with photos, small items cemented onto a background painting.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Now that's what I mean!! That's great!! The repositioning factor is very cool--leaving you time to get it right. And thanks for the gesso tip...I could not think of it's name to save my soul. Only 1 cup of Earl Grey this morning.

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I can remember making these as a kid with a friend and her mother. Now I think they are kinda creepy.

Apple face dolls

My favorite spoon rest was a ceramic tile, decorated for my by a second grade friend. Clouds and a sunshine. Sadly it broke in our last move, but I loved it.

On a more serious note, I have a tremendous amount of respect for the craft of the potter. I have some beautiful serving pieces that came from my husband's aunt's wheel.

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

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