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Hiroyuki

An interface between the two languages

355 posts in this topic

I thought the scene in the Italian restaurant with the headmistress teaching schoolgirls how to eat spaghetti in the Western manner is absolutely hilarious. The other scene that always sticks in my mind is the two lovers with the room service food - I can never quite look at eggs the same way again!

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I suspect there's a wrist double  :biggrin:

I didn't think about it but you are probably correct. I was just watch the DVD extra to Eat Drink Man Woman. Ang Lee gives an interview where he talk about having 6 general chefs who were stand-ins for the food prep shot. There are a lot of them in this movie.

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I thought the scene in the Italian restaurant with the headmistress teaching schoolgirls how to eat spaghetti in the Western manner is absolutely hilarious.  The other scene that always sticks in my mind is the two lovers with the room service food - I can never quite look at eggs the same way again!

Did you recognize the actor who plays the gangster? Have you seen Shall We Dance?


Edited by ojisan (log)

Monterey Bay area

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I thought the scene in the Italian restaurant with the headmistress teaching schoolgirls how to eat spaghetti in the Western manner is absolutely hilarious.  The other scene that always sticks in my mind is the two lovers with the room service food - I can never quite look at eggs the same way again!

Did you recognize the actor who plays the gangster? Have you seen Shall We Dance?

The original version? I think so, but a long time ago - I'm going to have to rewatch Tampopo and pay attention :)

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And Gun, Goro's young sidekick, is played by Ken Watanabe - the leader in Letters From Iwo Jima.


Monterey Bay area

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I love this movie. Not that this is relevant to the original post, the big bald man who slurps his pasta in a restaurant during the etiquette lesson is a famous French pastry chef A. Lecomte. Itami loved his pastries and he asked him to do a cameo. His patisserie was very famous in the 80's, it's still around but since he passed away it hasn't been the same. I think they still have a spot in Isetan Shinjuku debachika (department store basement). He use to make the best eclairs.


ahh where's the button for the fries?

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I'm not quite sure if this question fits in this thread but I'd like a translation of manjo and hinode. Both relating to mirin. Cheers

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I'm not quite sure if this question fits in this thread but I'd like a translation of manjo and hinode. Both relating to mirin. Cheers

I laughed :biggrin: Sorry, no offense intended.

Both are brands, Manjo being the brand of Kikkoman and Hinode being the brand of king jyozou Co.ltd.

Is that all you need to know?

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I'm not quite sure if this question fits in this thread but I'd like a translation of manjo and hinode. Both relating to mirin. Cheers

Well... Cutty Sark is a brand of whisky, and that means 'short skirt' or 'short dress'. 'Famous Grouse' is another, and a grouse is a particlar kind of bird.

Hinode means sunrise. Manjo - maybe 'good woman' ? I don't know this brand. What are the characters ?


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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OK, did I say I was drunk when I wrote that one?

Hinode 日の出 means sunrise, as Blether says.

Manjo マンジョウ or 万上 is a little complicated.

From this official webpage of Kikkoman

http://www.kikkoman.co.jp/manjo/aboutmanjo/index.html

In the mid-Edo period (11th year of Bunka), a sake brewer succeeded in making clear white mirin, but it became very popular throughout Edo.

The brewer wrote a poem, which included the phrases

ichi riki 一力 (lit. one force)

and

uenaki 上なき (second to one)

The first phrase is replaced by man 万 (ten thousand)

(When you put the first kanji 一 on top of the second 力, you get the kanji 万.)

The second is shortened to jo 上.

Thus, the mirin got its name, man-jo.

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Thanks Hiroyuki, and Blether,

you've answered my question :smile: and no offence taken :biggrin: . It should have been obvious in hindsight :unsure:

The reason why I asked is because I have both in the pantry and there is a significant difference in the colour. Light and dark.

I Appreciate your comments.

cheers

Craig

ps: that's ok Hiroyuki, I was drunk when I asked it :biggrin:


Edited by Craig Bayliss (log)

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uenaki 上なき (second to one)

This is a bit embarassing for my first post but.... I think you missed an "n," making it "none" not "one." This makes it quite literally an issue of one: one letter, one rank.

I'm just learning Japanese so I'm very happy to find such an interesting forum! Thanks for everyone's contribution.

:blush:

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uenaki 上なき (second to one)

This is a bit embarassing for my first post but.... I think you missed an "n," making it "none" not "one." This makes it quite literally an issue of one: one letter, one rank.

I'm just learning Japanese so I'm very happy to find such an interesting forum! Thanks for everyone's contribution.

:blush:

Thanks for the correction! Yes! None, not one. (Where's the blush smilie?)

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uenaki 上なき (second to one)

This is a bit embarassing for my first post but.... I think you missed an "n," making it "none" not "one." This makes it quite literally an issue of one: one letter, one rank.

I'm just learning Japanese so I'm very happy to find such an interesting forum! Thanks for everyone's contribution.

:blush:

Thanks for the correction! Yes! None, not one. (Where's the blush smilie?)

Under "Clickable Smilies" on the left hand side of the screen when you go to make a post there's "Show All" in blue. When you click on that, a window pops up with all the smilies. Or you can just type in ": blush :" (without the spaces of course).

:smile:

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What is the Japanese word and characters for ASPARTAME/NUTRASWEET?


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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What is the Japanese word and characters for ASPARTAME/NUTRASWEET?

Both Japanese words are approximizations of the English. So here are the romaji and the katakana for each:

Nutrasweet: nyu-torasui-to ニュートラスウィート

Aspartame: asuparute-mu アスパルテーム

(the dashes represent long sounds for the preceding vowel)

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ニュートラスウィート can also be spelled ニュートラスイート.

The product name for NUTRASWEET in Japan is パルスイート (Pal Sweet?).

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TY Both.

Im glad to see "e-ma" mints have none...


Wawa Sizzli FTW!

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I think that e-ma is using Xylitol, a sugar alcohol which is slightly lower in calories than sugar.


Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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ニュートラスウィート can also be spelled ニュートラスイート.

The product name for NUTRASWEET in Japan is パルスイート (Pal Sweet?).

Oops, thanks for that. I hope I'm not misleading anyone. I think I should leave the Japanese lessons to you, heh.

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ニュートラスウィート can also be spelled ニュートラスイート.

The product name for NUTRASWEET in Japan is パルスイート (Pal Sweet?).

Oops, thanks for that. I hope I'm not misleading anyone. I think I should leave the Japanese lessons to you, heh.

I appreciate your post, like anyone else. :smile:

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This is probably a really immature post, but it's been on my mind for a while. Recently I heard someone use the phrase 「ぶっかけご飯」(bukkake gohan) and its etymology has been bothering me. As an American I learned of ぶっかけ first in regards to something else entirely, something definitely more adult! Heh...

I was wondering if any native Japanese make puns to that effect or whether the sole connection between both the phrases 「ぶっかけご飯 」and 「ぶっかけ」 is the onomatopoetic sense. I just can't imagine that saying the phrase 「ぶっかけご飯」would not bring up those images.

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This is probably a really immature post, but it's been on my mind for a while. Recently I heard someone use the phrase 「ぶっかけご飯」(bukkake gohan) and its etymology has been bothering me. As an American I learned of ぶっかけ first in regards to something else entirely, something definitely more adult! Heh...

I was wondering if any native Japanese make puns to that effect or whether the sole connection between both the phrases 「ぶっかけご飯 」and 「ぶっかけ」 is the onomatopoetic sense. I just can't imagine that saying the phrase 「ぶっかけご飯」would not bring up those images.

For those Japanese who are in their 40s like me, bukkake has only one meaning, and is used in connection with gohan, soba, udon, and so on.

Words change with time, so I'm not sure what younger Japanese will have to say about your question. Maybe their encounter with this word may be quite similar to yours...

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