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Yard Sale, Thrift Store, Junk Heap Shopping (Part 1)


Rachel Perlow
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Inspired by this topic, I've stopped by almost every garage//thrift sale I've seen. I must live in the wrong area. I saw women excited about crappy paring knives with nicks in the blade, and way more Campbell soup mugs than a person had ought to be subject to in a lifetime. But, I'll persevere, assuming that one day, I'll happen on a sale like some of you have been to. I acutally today saw a pot that had a hole in the bottom! Burned clean through, and they wanted $1.00 for it! Planter, perhaps?

Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"
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Inspired by this topic, I've stopped by almost every garage//thrift sale I've seen.  I must live in the wrong area.  I saw women excited about crappy paring knives with nicks in the blade, and way more Campbell soup mugs than a person had ought to be subject to in a lifetime.  But, I'll persevere, assuming that one day, I'll happen on a sale like some of you have been to.  I acutally today saw a pot that had a hole in the bottom!  Burned clean through, and they wanted $1.00 for it!  Planter, perhaps?

Susan,

Hang in there! Do you know how many Saturdays I have been out for 3+ hours and never scored a thing? I have also seen chipped, broken and rusty stuff that I wonder why they did not put it directly into the trash. But this week I saw a whole lot of things that I would have bought but I just don't have room to store. Exquisite wine glasses and crystal fruit nappies, a ceramic terrine and loads more but I also saw loads of junk and overpriced stuff too. It's a gamble and you have to love the game! :biggrin:

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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  • 3 weeks later...

No toys this week but I grabbed a pile of cookbooks for $2.00 thinking only that they might provide a bit of reading material over the weekend. Most will be scanned and discarded but I scored two to keep: Thyme in the Kitchen by Yvonne Tremblay. This is a Canadian cookbook and has some very interesting uses for herbs. The second is the The Good Cook. This seems to be loosely based on the Time-Life series and credits Richard Olney as the General Editor. It has some excellent photos of techniques including boning a leg of lamb and larding and barding.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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way more Campbell soup mugs than a person had ought to be subject to in a lifetime.

hehehe--there are a lot of these around, I agree--I belong to a thrifting e-list and a lot of the people there find and collect neat mugs, so i look at mugs and do mostly see Campbell's ones or promo ones for obscure tech businesses or drugs (NJ is a big pharmacological state).

lately the kitchen pickens have been slim--but did get four small pottery bowls-- .50) that look like grapefruit --inside and out--perfect for morning yogurt.

also four OXO stainless steel utensils--$1 ea--spatula, slotted and regular serving spoons, and ladle.

oh, and a couple stainless steel saucepans for my MIL who burns pans constantly.

speaking of cookbooks--is anyone interested in doing a cookbook exchange? I always pick up cookbooks, keep them around for awhile and then move them out--donate them back usually--but it would be fun to exchange cookbooks, too.

Edited by zoe b (log)
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speaking of cookbooks--is anyone interested in doing a cookbook exchange? I always pick up cookbooks, keep them around for awhile and then move them out--donate them back usually--but it would be fun to exchange cookbooks, too.

There is another thread floating around for a cookbook exchange. I can't seem to find it at the moment, but recently posted a book and it was snapped up quickly.

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speaking of cookbooks--is anyone interested in doing a cookbook exchange? I always pick up cookbooks, keep them around for awhile and then move them out--donate them back usually--but it would be fun to exchange cookbooks, too.

There is another thread floating around for a cookbook exchange. I can't seem to find it at the moment, but recently posted a book and it was snapped up quickly.

Here it is:

"FREE cookbooks, if you want to add to your collection"

Not really an exchange, per se. It is a way to thin out your own collection. If you see something offered on this thread, respond as soon as you can since they tend to go quickly.

edited to add: respond to the poster via a PM/email...not on the discussion board. Then the poster will post on the board again letting everyone know what's been taken and what's still available.

Edited by Toliver (log)

 

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How do I keep missing all of these great threads?

Anyway, recent finds were a Food Saver and a Belgian Waffle iron - $4 each and neither looks like it's ever been used. Prior to that my ice cream maker - I would never have sprung for one because I didn't think I would use it that often. At 3 times in the first month, the $1.50 I paid for it seems quite reasonable!

And lastly I picked up four soup mugs that are round but the exteriors are decorated (both in clor and texture) like a corn cob, a head of cabbage, asparagus and carrots. How fun - even the S.O. (who suffers my inability to come home without something that must be shoe-horned into a cabinet) loved those. I swear, soup tastes better served in them :wink:

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Yesterday, it was a dollar copy of Escoffier, unearthed from among all the How to Microwave and brown-photo seventies Betty Crockers. 

Whimper. :wink:

And a couple of weeks ago, we were cruising a Flea Market in Tennessee, awaiting the arrival of our kids and Grands for a visit, and I spied a Larousse (in French) all tucked into the obviously-expensive precious stuff in a tall glass case. It stood between satiny old leather copies of Twain and Melville, and I was expecting a whopping price tag.

I opened to the price-page, and saw $150.00 printed in a sketchy, light, pencil hand. It was well worth it, but not to ME, at that time, if that makes sense. It's one of those things that, if it were MINE, and I were offered $150 for it, it would change hands in a heartbeat.

But then I took a second look. My quick glance had erred, and the $15.00 that I saw caused a little heartblip and handquiver to occur. I laid it quickly on the countertop, slid it gently toward the cashier. "I'll take this one, please."

And I hoped that she would not sense a moment of MAYBE, of discrepancy in the price and the obvious age and value of the book. She rang it up with the nonchalance of a clerk at Kroger, just skimming the keys, though she DID give it the reverence it deserved in the packing. She swished out three sheets of newsprint, the new kind---no printing and that pesky stainy ink---and wrapped it with an aplomb seldom seen outside 84 Charing Cross.

It's a 1926 edition, NOT just the gastronomie edition, but a compendium of many things---the cover lists "6200 Gravures, 220 Planches et Tableaux, and 140 Cartes" along with a lovely sort of bas relief picture, in several colors, of a lovely maiden sniffing a flower mongst the hills and trees (Persephone, maybe?).

A fun find, but I'll probably have to have my F/E dictionary at hand for a long read.

And on a later trip, I happened upon a trifling little thing, but one of slight wonder---a pretty little ceramic pot, wee matching spreader included, which is a perfect match for a printed tablecloth I bought WAY back in the Spring, AND for the pretty painted wooden tray all in shades of pale green, painted with charming pots of violets, found on another expedition weeks later, in another town, another store.

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had a moment of serendipity today--decided I HAD to have a Peugeot peppermill again--ours disappeared a while ago--it was a little one and probably got thrown out in the middle of a big pile of veggie trimmings or something...and we've been using stopgap mills --I'm ashamed to say a disposable one from Costco (which is pretty neat, actually, but the peppercorns are crap)

anyway, looked online for prices, checked ebay out and saw some possibilities and then headed out for the thrift--and spotted a brand new wooden Peugeot in light wood--I think 8"--for $2!!!

Zoe

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At the local Lion Thrift, A man was holding a wierd looking Asian statue. He started laughing at it. I heard him tell someone that it was a pepper grinder. I moved closer and closer, looking at the rags pile of used jeans. Perfect timing! As he set it down after his wife yelled at him, it was MINE! :wub:

It started playing "EDELWEISS" from an internal music box as I scooped it up and admired the satyr & flute on the top, and the crank and gargoyle whose mouth dispenses ground pepper on the side. Not to mention the porcelain circularorma around the side, with many topless maidens. The bottom 1 1/2" is the brass Swiss music box.The overall height is apprx. 11".

Cost??? :raz:

50 cents!! :laugh:

Enjoyment?!?

Priceless. :wacko:

Off to photograph it, research REUGE Swiss music boxes, and learn how to post photographs here.

Carpe Carp: Seize that fish!

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on my birthday a few years back i took the day off. i was wandering around my neighborhood (montmartre, paris) when in a local vintage shop I spied 5 nesting copper saucepans in all the useful sizes. a hundred bucks. they were from the early 20th century, tin lined and *never used*. nice and heavy, too, as i found when i hefted them. happy birthday to me! i love those pots and don't care that i have to have them re-tinned every few years. they conduct heat like Giulini at La Scala.

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At the local Lion Thrift, A man was holding a wierd looking Asian statue. He started laughing at it. I heard him tell someone that it was a pepper grinder. I moved closer and closer, looking at the rags pile of used jeans. Perfect timing! As he set it down after his wife yelled at him, it was MINE! :wub:

It started playing "EDELWEISS" from an internal music box as I scooped it up and admired the satyr & flute on the top, and the crank and gargoyle whose mouth dispenses ground pepper on the side. Not to mention the porcelain circularorma around the side, with many topless maidens. The bottom 1 1/2" is the brass Swiss music box.The overall height is apprx. 11".

Cost???  :raz:

50 cents!!  :laugh:

Enjoyment?!?

Priceless. :wacko:

Off to photograph it, research REUGE Swiss music boxes, and learn how to post photographs here.

I am green with envy and anxiously await your photos. I have a milestone birthday coming up in the not-too-distant future . . . :wink:

Judy Jones aka "moosnsqrl"

Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.

M.F.K. Fisher

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Those copper pans and that amazing pepper mill are wonderful finds! Today, nothing of interest for eGullet, excepting a small Lalique plate, edged in leaves, $2.00, and more importantly, a paperback copy of The Turkish Kitchen by Acar Yayinlari... in English! Ten cents.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Today I found 6 dinner plates that appealed to me - my own set is plain white which is great but once in a while I need a change - these appealed to me - they vaguely remind me of Copenhagen china - I did say vaguely. I also found this flat serving dish. I have been on the hunt for something like this for some time. Total cost was $4.00 - not bad eh?

gallery_6903_111_33507.jpg

gallery_6903_111_20304.jpg

Edited to add photos. The angle at which I took these has distorted them somewhat!

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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At the local Lion Thrift, A man was holding a wierd looking Asian statue. He started laughing at it. I heard him tell someone that it was a pepper grinder. I moved closer and closer, looking at the rags pile of used jeans. Perfect timing! As he set it down after his wife yelled at him, it was MINE! :wub:

It started playing "EDELWEISS" from an internal music box as I scooped it up and admired the satyr & flute on the top, and the crank and gargoyle whose mouth dispenses ground pepper on the side. Not to mention the porcelain circularorma around the side, with many topless maidens. The bottom 1 1/2" is the brass Swiss music box.The overall height is apprx. 11".

Cost???  :raz:

50 cents!!  :laugh:

Enjoyment?!?

Priceless. :wacko:

Off to photograph it, research REUGE Swiss music boxes, and learn how to post photographs here.

Please do post pictures!

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Today I found 6 dinner plates that appealed to me - my own set is plain white which is great but once in a while I need a change - these appealed to me - they vaguely remind me of Copenhagen china - I did say vaguely.  I also found this flat serving dish.  I have been on the hunt for something like this for some time.  Total cost was $4.00 - not bad eh?

  The angle at which I took these has distorted them somewhat!

Fantastic china.

I found a pink and red "Chintz" plate at a thrift store I had to walk past when I went to the Phillipine market last week. I rarely look there because it is 99% children's stuff (tiny storefront) but they had this neat plate in the window.

I have several multi-level plate stands for serving pastries and etc., and I like unusual decorated plates that show color through the lacy doilies I put on them.

I used to use some of my Indian Tree plates but after someone knocked a 5-tier off a table, breaking 4 of the plates, I decided that even though I have service for 24 plus some extras, I didn't want to lose any more as replacements are now very expensive.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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...

I used to use some of my Indian Tree plates but after someone knocked a 5-tier off a table, breaking 4 of the plates, I decided that even though I have service for 24 plus some extras, I didn't want to lose any more as replacements are now very expensive.

I am very curious - what are Indian Tree plates? I have never heard of them.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I have never found anything as impressive as some of you, but I did find a little treasure this weekend.

Most of you know that the old, color glazed Pyrex is hard to find, and when you do find it, you'll be paying through the nose (I bought a Pyrex four bowl nesting set in the primary colors a few months ago and paid $90 for them, just so you get an idea.).

Anyway, after delivering a birthday cake, I passed by a garage sale that wasn't loaded down with clothes and kids stuff. I caught a glint of copper on one of the tables so I had to stop. I walked around the tables filled with coffee mugs, stuffed sea gulls glued on pieces of driftwood, you know, the usual tacky garbage.

The copper I saw was nothing more than an old, dented FTD vase, so there went my hopes of finding a real gem. Then I stumbled (literally) across these:

pyrexbowls.jpg

For $2.00, I could not pass these up. I had never seen Pyrex bowls that had the pour spout/handles, so that was an added "bonus".

Gear nerd and hash slinger

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...

For $2.00, I could not pass these up. I had never seen Pyrex bowls that had the pour spout/handles, so that was an added "bonus".

Congratulations! They are gorgeous.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Chris came home the other day with a little plastic "rice cooker" for the microwave. It was $1.49 in the paw-through-it basket in the grocery store, and had originally been marked 15.99. I tried the rice recipe---it was AWFUL. Soggy grains on the bottom, still-rattly bits on the top--absolutely inedible.

I ran it through the dishwasher and stuck it in the pantry, then just now, I used it to steam a couple of cups of broccoli florets---three minutes over the water and they are bright green and just perfectly cooked. We're having the broccoli and lemon butter with our fried chicken, sides of Looziana rice and slaw. Glad I didn't toss the thing.

Other lately-founds are a new "air" rectangular cakepan--2.99, Four chrome-steel kitchen chairs (horrid orange burlappy upholstery, but they'll be great for outdoor parties---bent legs that won't sink into the lawn)--30.00, and a LOVELY Doulton two-tier pastry stand in a pale pattern of plums and leaves--2.92.

And Anna--dish-envy of those blue plates!!

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I have followed these topics and enjoyed them -- just haven't posted about it before. Thrift shop shopping ( :huh: ) was new to me when I first moved to FL. It is BIG around here. I go to one of the thrift shops that benefits Hospice once or twice a week, and other organizations' shops in between. Just today I bought four beautiful Christmas plates which I will use during the holidays. It was a Christmas in July sale, and all holiday stuff was half off, plus as a Hospice employee I get half off. The four plates which are an exclusive from Pier One cost me $1.58 and that included tax! I wouldn't be able to find paper plates at that price. I have loads of kitchen stuff from these places. My problem is that I sometimes feel guilty, the deals are so good.

Life is short; eat the cheese course first.

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