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Low-Carb Wines Are Coming


Carolyn Tillie
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Not particularly. Most white wines are, by their nature, low-carb to begin with. And red wine makers have been touting its health benefits for years. Marketing is marketing. I'm actually encouraged that folks with restricted diets are being accomodated. That's nothing to be sad about IMO.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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I'm less concerned about the label issues than the idea that they (the winemakers) may have to compromise their craft to "make" a wine low-carb.

I have no problems with the idea that some wines are naturally low-carb, just as some food is naturally fat-free or low-carb, etc... What I find sad is the state of the world in which we live that manipulates the consumer's mind into believing what is printed on a label.

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Here, here, bravo and bully, Carolyn!! It's getting to the point where one more 'lo carb' announcement will push me over the edge ~ I'm SICK of it I tell you, SICK. :angry: It's revolting the way every manufacturer is climbing over each other to slap the label on their product, even if it's a) patently obvious or b)patently reedeekewlous. :hmmm: I realize it's a dog-eat-lo-carb-dog world out there, but there has to be an end to the pandering...doesn't there? :unsure:

I'm starting to think there's only about 12 people left on earth who don't give a sh!t about lo-carb.

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I'm starting to think there's only about 12 people left on earth who don't give a sh!t about lo-carb.

thank you...

So, there's you, me, FatGuy, bleudauvergne (check out that amazing food blog!), and who else?

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I'm less concerned about the label issues than the idea that they (the winemakers) may have to compromise their craft to "make" a wine low-carb.

This, I agree with completely. A wine that has been 'adjusted' to fit unnatural marketing parameters is not one I'd be interested in trying.

What I find sad is the state of the world in which we live that manipulates the consumer's mind into believing what is printed on a label.

Same as it ever was. I'm not bothered by this as long as the claims made on those labels are true.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Count me in. I'll stand with the carb eaters anyday!

I've also lost it in regards to this low carb nonsense.....don't you wonder what's next after everyone gets tired of this????

I'll take my wine just the way the winemaker intended...not the marketer. Thank you very much.

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Count me in as one of the 12.  I'm proud to stand with each and every one of you.

LMAO! There are a lot more than 12 of you. :biggrin:

Marketing aside, diversity (of backgrounds, interests, preferences, etc.) is something to be appreciated, not lamented.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Well, there's nothing that missing a marketer's beady little brain, eh? The only silver lining I see is if it gets more people to drink wine (other than high carb beer).

But I personally can't wait for people to ask "Remember when there used to be all this low-carb stuff?" That day can't come soon enough.

We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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I don't count carbs either!

I DO count the days until my next meal of fried chicken, mashed potatoes and cream gravy though!

Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

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If I were a company like Kraft, I would have tested every product in my company and whatever item proved to be low carb would have a new "Low Carb!" label slapped on it and the unit price would be raised. Which is exactly what has happened.

So the winemakers are doing the same thing (not sure about the price raising though). It's a smart thing to do especially if part of your target audience has suddenly stopped drinking alcohol-related products due to concerns about carb consumption.

I'd be interested to see how the Atkins craze has impacted the wine-beer-alcoholic beverage industry. Obviously, there has been some sort of impact since Low-Carb Beers are debuting left and right. The winemakers are just following suit.

From my perspective, it's not that they're joining the "Low Carb Craze". They're just making sure their pro-low-carb customers are aware that their products are still okay to consume. A la Martha, It's a Good Thing.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I think the low carb craze has become some sort of mass hysteria. After reading, and laughing along with this thread yesterday, I rode my back across the Manhattan Bridge to go to the gym (to work off all carbs that I had consummed, of course!), and this was grafitti-ed all over the bike way!

What are we coming to???? i5815.jpg

Edit: to correct image posting

Edited by hathor (log)
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Give me rice and pasta every day!. Is there anyone else here that doesn't thrive on a low-carb diet? A lack of good carbs makes me feel tired and um, digestively inefficient.

Our winemaker, Dover Dan, reports good effect from the Atkins/South Beach diet, but when it's time for his "one glass of wine a day," I notice he gets out the 24 oz. super-size wine glass!

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Mary Baker

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I'm less concerned about the label issues than the idea that they (the winemakers) may have to compromise their craft to "make" a wine low-carb.

This, I agree with completely. A wine that has been 'adjusted' to fit unnatural marketing parameters is not one I'd be interested in trying.

i don't find myself interested in trying most BV wines to begin with. :rolleyes:

Edited by tommy (log)
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I distinctly remember an effort to point out that wine was fat-free, during the low/non-fat obsession of the previous decades. we can only hope that this too shall pass. the only things left to target are protein, water and micro-nutrients. count me among the carb and full-fat eaters.

lisa

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Thank you, Tommy. I was trying not to go into a rant. :biggrin:

I've been eating lowcarb since... about 1997 or so. It tightly controls my diabetes with no medications and allows me to have wine with dinner every night.... wine that my relatives on oral meds and insulin without good control cannot enjoy.

I do, however, heartily deplore the lack of knowledge (and desire for it) most American consumers have about nutrition and other health choices that makes this kind of marketing prevalent.

Edited 'cause I can't type. That's why I have an executive assistant at work....

Edited by Cynthia G (log)
"Portion control" implies you are actually going to have portions! ~ Susan G
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I do, however, heartily deplore the lack of knowledge (and desire for it) most American consumers have about nutrition and other health choices that makes this kind of marketing prevalent.

not to worry, i don't mind doing the ranting and taking the heat. :biggrin:

for me, i don't get too upset about lack of knowledge or ignorance vis-a-vis people's choices about their diets as much as i deplore the ignorance associated with railing against those personal decisions, especially considering that there are many professionals (doctors, nutritionists, etc) who are suggesting the same. but i expect too much from people, and i haven't yet found that one source that has all of the "right" answers. :rolleyes:

Edited by tommy (log)
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I'm less concerned about the label issues than the idea that they (the winemakers) may have to compromise their craft to "make" a wine low-carb.

This, I agree with completely. A wine that has been 'adjusted' to fit unnatural marketing parameters is not one I'd be interested in trying.

i don't find myself interested in trying most BV wines to begin with. :rolleyes:

You've never tasted a BV Private Reserve, Georges de Latour, have you?

Here's some tasting notes (in order of preference) I was lucky enough to sample that might be worth your time:

1968 - Garnet lights, mature nose with some heat. A sweetness that gives the impression of port. Excellence balance, sweet, and long with no remaining tannins detectable.

1970 - Good, dark ruby color and aromas of plum, spice, and berry. Velvety tannins and a chewy finish.

1978 - Smooth, ripe, and spicy with complex plum, currant, olive, and cherry flavors, Understated.

1966 - Brick red. Herbaceous nose. Light body. Well-balanced, short, sharp finish.

1974 - Nasty. Just plain nasty.

1985 - TCA, sadly.

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