Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Suggestions for Vegetarian Multi - Cuisine menu


Recommended Posts

Okie I know that this topic shoud go in the general topics but I have put it here for the reason that I need Indians who are exposed to western cuisine but understand Indian food habits to advise me. I need to put together a vegetarian multi cuisine menu for a group of passengers travelling to South Africa. It needs to have some amount of Indian food in it but other food will also work like Mexican and Italian.

Any suggestions, advice on what to watch out for?

Rushina

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry thought I mentioned tha, they are a group of well travelled indians taking a holiday. The property they are visiting has asked me to help put the menus together. The multi cuisine aspect because the groups that generally require vegetarian menus are also the ones that are sticklers for Indian food or Jain food, in this case they are okay with other cuisines (no chinese) as long as it is vegetarian. Vegetarian means no chicken stock etc.

Rushina

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rushina, not sure I understand your query. Is this a group that's going to SA and wants to know what veg food options are available? Or is it one of those kitchen-tours where they take along their own chef and you're looking for suggestions for menus he could make? Or suggestions for the hotels, restaurants they might be visiting?

I don't need to tell you that Indian veg options of some kind will be available in most large SAn cities, though its not always that easy to access them - you might need to ask someone there to do some scouting around in the Indian areas for restaurants or caterers. It is my impression - quite possibly inaccurate, since when I was in SA I didn't exactly go around looking for Indians to spend time with! - that many SA Indians are now non-vegetarian, but then again I have distant Gujju relatives there who are strictly vegetarian still.

The plus side about vegetarian in SA is that the quality of the fruit and veg can be outstanding, especially in the Cape area. One could happily subsist on just the wonderful fruits and breads and pastries. Those vast malls that most SAns retreat into for their leisure activities also would generally have some places with decent veg options - I remember many Greek/Italian style cafes where you could certainly get excellent salads, veg pizzas and quiches and so on.

There are also excellent and stylish places like the Primi Piatti chain and local delis like Melissas in Cape Town or a place in Melville in Jo'burg called the Service Station, I think, where there were lots of very good ready to eat options with plenty of choice for vegetarians. On Long Street in Cape Town there's a small, cafe called Lola's which is vegetarian - not outstanding food, but a really cool and funky place. In Cape Town there is also a restaurant called Periamma's run by a very cool Indian woman who cooks a set menu every evening including lots of good veg basics, and presumably she could do more is warned in advance. And if they're willing to spend, then the really top end restaurants will all be able to provide good veg options.

Despite all this, the truth is it can get quite bleak for vegetarians. While the bf was living there, he went through a phase when he turned mostly veg simply in reaction to all the meat he was getting on a daily basis. At which point he was faced with one veg staple - butternut squash which he found being served up every lunch and every dinner, and if they could have found a way to give it for breakfast they would have. After a point he simply could not face butternut squash again!

Vikram

Link to post
Share on other sites
Sorry thought I mentioned tha, they are a group of well travelled indians taking a holiday. The property they are visiting has asked me to help put the menus together. The multi cuisine aspect because the groups that generally require vegetarian menus are also the ones that are sticklers for Indian food or Jain food, in this case they are okay with other cuisines (no chinese) as long as it is vegetarian. Vegetarian means no chicken stock etc.

Rushina

Are they lacto-ovo vegeterians? If yes, I'll pm you some suggestions

Link to post
Share on other sites
they are a group of well travelled indians taking a holiday. The property they are visiting has asked me to help put the menus together. The multi cuisine aspect because the groups that generally require vegetarian menus are also the ones that are sticklers for Indian food or Jain food, in this case they are okay with other cuisines (no chinese) as long as it is vegetarian.

The "no chinese" stipulation should be read as a warning, probably an indication that the menu should be Indian by default.

We recently had a dinner for two vegetarian Tam-Brahm couples, not just well-travelled but settled in the US for over a decade. I figured we'd make Italian rather than desi.

It was a disaster. They were game, and tried to put a good face on it but it was tough to do so.

Turns out that they were unfamiliar with (and very turned off by) sun-dried tomatoes - one of the main ingredients of the pasta. And all four of them were suspicious of and resistant to mushrooms - the main ingredient of the appetizer. And that's after ten years plus of living in the US.

Thus, my instinct is to recommend that you stick to Indian or heavily Indianized dishes, unless this group tells you in advance - we eat mushrooms, we like pasta, we don't need rice every day, etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Sheel
      Prawn Balchao is a very famous Goan pickle that has a sweet, spicy and tangy flavor to it. 
      For the balchao paste you will need:
      > 8-10 kashmiri red chillies
      > 4-5 Byadagi red chillies
      > 1/2 tsp cumin seeds
      > 1/2 tsk turmeric powder 
      > 1 tsp peppercorn
      > 6 garlic cloves
      > 1/2 tsp cloves
      > 1 inch cinnamon stick
      > Vinegar 
      First you will need to marinate about 250 grams of prawns in some turmeric powder and salt. After 15 minutes deep fry them in oil till them become golden n crisp. Set them aside and add tsp vinegar to them and let it sit for 1 hour. Now, make a paste of all the ingredients mentioned under the balchao paste and make sure not to add any water. In the same pan used for fryin the prawns, add in some chopped garlic and ginger. Lightly fry them and immediately add one whole chopped onion. Next, add the balchao paste amd let it cook for 2-3 minutes. Add in the prawns and cook until the gravy thickens. Finally add 1 tsp sugar and salt according to your taste. Allow it to cool. This can be stored in a glass jar. Let this mature for 1-3 weeks before its use. Make sure never to use water at any stage. This can be enjoyed with a simple lentil curry and rice.
    • By Deeps
      This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish.  Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries.
      Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results.
       

       
      Prep Time : 5 mins
      Cook Time: 5 mins
      Serves: 2
       
      Ingredients:
      1 cup rice(basmati), cooked
      1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated
      1 green chili, slit
      1 dried red chili
      1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter)
      1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
      1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
      1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas)
      1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram)
      1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
      A pinch of hing (asafoetida)
      Few curry leaves
      Salt to taste
       
      Directions
      1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish.
      2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned.
      3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well.
      4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame.
      5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
    • By loki
      Vietnamese Pickled Eggplant
       
      These use tiny white eggplants that are nearly impossible to get here.  I tried to grow them without success (this time).  I did not have these so used unripe cherry tomatoes.
       
      Ingredients
      2 lb eggplant (tiny white SE Asian types) or green cherry tomatoes.
      1/4 cup salt
      1 TBL galangal root
      1 TBL ginger root
      12 green chilies - thai peppers or serranos
      6 cloves garlic
      1/2 cup onion finely chopped
      2 cup Granulated sugar
      2 cup water
      1/4 cup fish sauce
       
      1. Rinse off eggplant and pierce with a knife - or cut in half if larger than 3/4 inch in diameter.
       
      2. Put eggplant into jar and add salt - and water to top of jar.  Cover with plastic lid and cover loosely.  Let ferment for 7 days.
       
      3. Take out eggplant and drain.  Rinse with water.  Put into jars again.
       
      4. Chop ginger, galangal, chiles, onion, and garlic.
       
      5. Boil water and sugar, add spices and onion, and heat for 5 minutes.  Add fish sauce.
       
      6. Pour over eggplants making sure the spices and onion get all around (might have to take out some eggplant and return).
       
      7. Cover with plastic lid, and refrigerate.
       
      8. Ready in several days.  Will last a very long time in the refrigerator.
       
      Notes:  Good alongside other SE Asian dishes, or even alone with rice.  The green tomatoes are not the same texture as the eggplants, but are quite good.  The eggplants are very crispy.
       
    • By Kasia
      Courgette cutlets
       
      I found the recipe for courgette cutlets at www.gotujzcukiereczkiem.pl. It appealed to me at once for three reasons. Firstly, the courgette is my favourite vegetable. Secondly, cutlets, pancakes and crumpets are my children's favourites dishes. Thirdly, this dish is fast, simple and is always a success. You must not use FB while frying, because it may end with you ordering pizza for dinner 

      The cutlets are mild and their flavour is spiced up with feta cheese. You can complement them with your favourite herbs. In my kitchen there is always basil, dill, peppermint, rosemary and thyme. This time I chose dill (in accordance with the recipe) and thyme.

      Ingredients:
      400g of courgette
      1 egg
      150g of feta cheese
      110g of breadcrumbs (+ 4 tablespoons for the batter)
      2 tablespoons of minced dill
      1 tablespoon of thyme
      salt and pepper

      Wash the courgette and grate it. Add salt and leave it in a bowl for 15 minutes. Drain it then mix in the egg, feta cheese, breadcrumbs and herbs. Spice it up with salt and pepper. Make small cutlets with the mixture and fry in oil. Serve with natural yoghurt.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Creamy soup with broad beans
       
      During my last visit to the fruit and vegetable market I bought so many broad beans that I didn't want to risk cooking everything at once. I prepared a rich, creamy soup with them. The green soup, served with a bit of thick yoghurt and nigella, was very tasty.
       
      Ingredients (for 5 people):
      1 kg of broad beans
      half an onion
      1 clove of garlic
      1 tablespoon of butter
      4 sprigs of thyme
      1 tablespoon of caraway seeds
      vegetable stock
      5 teaspoons of thick natural yoghurt
      2 teaspoons of nigella
      2 tablespoons of sunflowers seeds
      salt and pepper

      Cook the broad beans in salty water with the caraway seeds, drain and peel them. Try not to eat everything. Chop the onion and garlic and fry them in butter. Put the peeled broad beans, onion, garlic and sprigs of thyme into a saucepan. Pour in the vegetable stock to cover the vegetables and boil for 10 minutes. Take out the thyme and blend the soup to make a smooth cream. Add vegetable stock until you have the right consistence. Roast the sunflower seeds in a dry pan. Serve the soup with thick natural yoghurt, nigella and sunflower seeds.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...