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We now have an index!


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A recent discussion with Fat Guy about ways in which the Coffee & Tea forum might be elevated, promoted and imbued with a unique character of its own has prompted introduction of a forum index. Many topics that have fallen to lower pages have worthwhile information for both eGullet newcomers researching coffee topics and long time forum regulars looking for previous discussions.

Additional content will be added in the future, some of it in the form of lockedtopics that will be mini-tutorials, but most of the threads will remain as is for additional replies.

Any suggestions for subjects that should be referenced in the index will be appreciated - just PM me with the details or feel free to reply to this thread for open discussion.

I'll also add a Tea section to the index in the near future. As always, thanks for your support of eGullet in general and our little caffeinated corner in particular!

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Whoa, an index! How ambitious! Much respect to you! Sounds like your salary should be doubled for all the extra work you'll be doing...

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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What a grerat idea and nicely done. I imagine that this would bre rather difficult to institute on some of the other boards, however, it is incredibly useful.

John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Sounds like your salary should be doubled for all the extra work you'll be doing...

Why should I settle for a lousy doubling of pay (what's 2x0?) when the lure of a grander title is dangling out there in the future?

Yes, it would be a daunting task in most of the other forums due not only to the breadth of their discussions but also sheer number of archived posts. Coffee & Tea is only at a paltry six pages thus far - it was a simple task to dig through the threads and pull out the most pertinent stuff.

I believe I'll be splitting it into two sections - one for pinned and locked informational/tutorial type threads and the other for discussion related topics.

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Sounds like your salary should be doubled for all the extra work you'll be doing...

Why should I settle for a lousy doubling of pay (what's 2x0?) when the lure of a grander title is dangling out there in the future?

How about "Grand Poobah of Coffee and Tea"? How does that sound? :biggrin:

But seriously, it's great that you've done this.

Michael aka "Pan"

 

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I imagine that this would bre rather difficult to institute on some of the other boards

Yes, the New York hosts are going to be incredibly busy!

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Love the index idea, but I cannot access any of the links. Is it just me? I get the same error message "The error returned was: You do not have permission to view this topic. "

I believe my account is in working order and assume that the Index should be available to all?

just curious....

Lisa

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Love the index idea, but I cannot access any of the links. Is it just me? I get the same error message "The error returned was: You do not have permission to view this topic. "

yep, I got the same message.

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:sad: Same here. Owen, I think you need to return your second quart of yogurt to FG.

BTW, I read in Bleu's blog that Jim Early was your uncle. Totally cool. Your stock has just gone up, even in spite of the above index hiccup ....... :wink:

"Portion control" implies you are actually going to have portions! ~ Susan G
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I believe I have discovered the source of the problem - the forum section in which I "parked" the sub-indexes is accessibel only to forum hosts and moderators. I'll check with the Poobah's and find out where I can stick them so all wil be functional. I refuse to put them where the sun don't shine so don't even go there :wink:

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Or you could just post the Forum Hosts/Mods passwords for us to use..... :biggrin:

That would be my own personal password and believe me... I won't reveal it of only for the fact that it would make me blush and a few of you wonder....

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The index is fixed! The sub-index topics have been movced so that they are now viewable. Functionality could be a bit smoother in that multipel windows open but it works for now. At some point in ythe no-so-distant future the site may have software technology that will obsolete this index method but for now.... this may be helpful to some - thanks for your patience!

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The index is fixed! The sub-index topics have been movced so that they are now viewable. Functionality could be a bit smoother in that multipel windows open but it works for now. At some point in ythe no-so-distant future the site may have software technology that will obsolete this index method but for now.... this may be helpful to some - thanks for your patience!

Cool, it works! Now I wish all the forums had this, it's ever so hard to find stuff... :wink:

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I won't reveal it of only for the fact that it would make me blush and a few of you wonder....

Now some of us are gonna wonder anyway...... :hmmm:

Thanks for fixing the index, Owen. Great idea.

"Portion control" implies you are actually going to have portions! ~ Susan G
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