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the kitchen


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anyone eaten there yet? the denver post had a brief thing on it yesterday--apparently owned and co-chef'd by some recent millionaire who sold a food-based webservice to compaq for $307 million...in cash (!); the other chef is some guy who used to work with jamie oliver. not sure what the owner's chef credentials are. anyone?

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I've also not been to The Kitchen, but here's a link to a story that appeared in the Daily Camera last week. (I didn't see the article in the Post, so I don't know if the Post just repeated the Camera story or gives more/different information.)

And in This column, Catherine Christiansen reports:

Kimbal Musk and Hugo Matheson of The Kitchen, 1039 Pearl Street, (303) 544-5973, began their "soft opening" March 16 with a $30 prix fixe early spring menu including entrees such as wild salmon with asparagus and morels and a grilled leg of spring lamb with cannelloni and arugula. The grand opening is April 15 and will be a benefit for the Rocky Mountain ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) chapter. Cost is $25 per person and includes a sampling of food and beverage from the menu. Tickets will be available at the door or reserve a spot by e-mailing becci@thekitchencafe.com.
Edited by afoodnut (log)
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  • 4 weeks later...

We went to The Kitchen and sat at the bar. A little pricier than you might expect. Better than the place that was in the space before it (Triana). I would probably go back for drinks and appetizers.

They had a "Classics" menu with appetizers, mains, desserts, and sides, as well as "THE MENU" ($33 prix fixe with your choice of appetizer, entree, and dessert). You could also order the items on "THE MENU" individually. Flip-side was "THE WINE." 7 whites, 7 reds, 3 dessert wines, 3 sparklers. Third piece of hard paper consisted of the drinks. 5 specialty martinis including a Key Lime Pie Martini, 4 premium beers like Chimay, 10 imported beers like Foster's, 5 local brews like Fat Tire, 2 light beers, a few non-alcoholic selections like Izze, some single malt scotches, grappa, brandy/cognacs, port, and 3 additional dessert wines.

Their menu states that they always look locally first before choosing a supplier, and 50% of their kitchen is wind-powered, although their publicist might want to re-word the statement that proudly proclaims they "FED-EX" their fish in.

Here's what we had:

Prosecco with blood oranges

Small cheese plate featuring cheeses from the excellent Boulder Cheese Co. (Epoisses, Berkshire Blue, Haystack Mtn Goat cheese, and one mystery selection I could not discern along with 3 tiny pieces of bread, a little balsamic drizzed in the center, a couple of sun dried tomatoes, and a dab of fruit spread).

Marc Tempe Riesling, Alsace '99

"The Brazilian" (Absolut and organic limes on the rocks)

Fresh Crab Spaghetti with chili, parsley, and lemon zest

Coleman rib-eye with herb butter that they cooked the hell out of (served with fries)

"Saketini" (Junmai Hakushika Sake and Ketel One Citroen)

Creme Brulee

Pot Au Chocolat

Chateau Suduiraut Sauternes '96 (divine with the creme brulee)

The bartender also gave us a taste of the Yalumba Botrytis Semillon.

They have a website now: The Kitchen Cafe Website.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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On Tuesday, after starting with the 75-cent happy hour oysters and $2 Zolo Red pints at Jax, Spouse and I stopped by The Kitchen.

We sat at the bar and ordered $2 Fat Tires (no draft beers) and snacks off the happy hour menu: a bowl of house-marinated olives ($2) and the charcuterie plate ($6 or $7). The latter consisted of a slab of house-made country-style pate, some capicola, a lovely prosciutto, and slices of a really extraordinary dry-cure chorizo. The plate came with olives, cornichons, pickled onions, and chutney, and was served with a basket of bread.

When we asked a waiter about the chorizo, Chef Hugo was summoned from the kitchen. He told us about the provenance of the chorizo (which is sold by the cheese store across from Liquor Mart) and brought us out a sample of another dry chorizo, this one an interesting smoky version from Spain. It's clear he really cares about the food.

There were other yummy-sounding options on the happy hour menu, including a wild mushroom fettucine and a bowl of mussels. It's a cheap way to try out the restaurant -- the regular menu and prix fixe dinners are somewhat pricey, but I can't wait for an excuse to try them.

"Part of the secret of success in life is to eat what you like and let the food fight it out inside." Mark Twain
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  • 2 weeks later...

Returned for appetizers and drinks @ the bar, so hopefully I will be able to type this correctly and not make up any words.

Key Lime Pie Martini - My god, this was good. It was just like eating a key lime pie so I felt guilty for starting with dessert.

Italian Tomato Soup from the Classics menu for 5 bucks. Not bad, but it didn't change my life or set fireworks off in my mouth or anything. Drizzled with some olive oil and sprinkled with some basil.

Torchon of Foie Gras with port wine poached figs. Mmmmm. Okay, Colorado e-gulleters, I must confess I've always wanted to but had never tried foie gras until now. I see a 12-step program in my future. So you have to tell me where else to try this around here so I can start making comparisons. Bay Area suggestions also welcomed so I can go crash with my friends and eat foie gras and crab cakes until I hurl unsightly objects.

I wanted to try the recommended Kasu Black Cod seared over mustard greens, but the embarrassed bartender had to return and admit they were out of it. I asked about the Fresh Crab Salad with avocado and fresh chili, but it didn't get a ringing endorsement from the staff.

So I ordered the Organic Colorado Heirloom Tomato Salad. Nothing like Jennifer Jasinski's heirloom tomato salads, unfortunately. The tomatoes were a bit mealy so I'm surprised they put this on the menu when the ingredients weren't up to snuff. Chunks of tomatoes with some bread and basil and olive oil drizzled over it.

Hubby ordered a blackberry Izze and a house lemonade. Had the rigatoni with peas, burrata cheese, and olio verde. It looked a little plain, but I didn't try any since I didn't want to pass along the cold I am getting over.

Somewhere in there I also downed a Kitchen Cosmo. Not really food-friendly, but I didn't expect it to be. Just felt like a cosmo dammit. Alcohol doesn't lower your immunity, does it? :biggrin:

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Torchon of Foie Gras with port wine poached figs. Mmmmm. Okay, Colorado e-gulleters, I must confess I've always wanted to but had never tried foie gras until now. I see a 12-step program in my future. So you have to tell me where else to try this around here so I can start making comparisons.

Well, even though I can't stand the stuff, Mark Monette (Flagstaff House) seems to be one of foie gras' biggest fans outside of Iron Chef. I think there are 3 or 4 appetizers with it on the menu.

TheMatt

Learning just means you were wrong and they were right. - Aram

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  • 1 month later...

Went to the Kitchen last night with Mr. H for an impromptu date. We sat at the tiny outside tables and ordered appetizers only:

charcuterie plate -- miniscule slices of proscuitto, salume, a slab of very plain homemade pate, a handful of assorted olives (now I'm really feeling like they raided the olive bar at Whole Foods), a grapefruit chutney that I did enjoy.

roast beet salad with hazelnuts and goat cheese -- yawn. Absolutely no seasoning whatsoever, no salt, no pepper let alone the hint of an herb.

green pea bruschetta with homemade mozzerrella. A successful dish because of the freshness of the mashed peas -- intense green color and the freshness of the mozzerella.

Ingredients are fresh, flavors bland. OK, we did not order such exciting dishes, but frankly nothing looked all that "interesting" for what is supposed to be this hot new restaurant. I'd rather head down to Adega, where even something as simple as roasted beet salad is elevated to an art and has some unsual twist for the palate.

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There is certainly no mistaking The Kitchen for Adega. I like it for what it is--a place to hang out at the bar while a breeze is coming through, have a tasty drink, and nibble on some cheese or dessert. Their food is indeed a little plain, but I can't live on blow-out-the-back-of-my-head green chile alone.

Okay, maybe I can. :rolleyes:

Oh, and I am jealous of that 19 states in 3 weeks thing. You must post about more of your meals & experiences.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Sheehan reviews The Kitchen in this week's Westword. The title is Boulder Blahs: The Kitchen Puts the Flat in the Flatirons:

Boulder Blahs

Edited by rlm (log)

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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We re-visited the Kitchen last night (before reading rlm's post of Sheehan's review) and I am sorry to say that I agree with his assessment almost 100%. Since we only ordered apps last time and given that the $33 prix fixe is a reasonably good deal, we decided to go for the full on dinner experience. I ordered the pork rillete to start -- good texture of this classic dish, the right amount of meat/fat ratio, it was served in large chunks on burnt toast and sprinkled with capers. What is with this chef and the lack of seasoning? Did they not unpack the spice drawer? forget to forage the herbs when making their run to Whole Foods for every other ingredient on the menu? I added salt and fresh pepper, which by the way Mr. H had to ask for when his Ceasar Salad came, the response "I'll see if I can find some" . . but it still lacked any flavor. Mr. H ordered the halibut and I ordered the ahi filet RARE w/ tapenade for the main courses. The halibut arrived atop a bed of tomatoey risotto and tasted simple, fresh good but again, underseasoned and no discernable stand out flavors. The ahi that arrived was, I am not kidding , GREY, through and through. I am talking the kind of grey that you get if you are dumb enough to order tuna as your choice at a wedding banquet in, say Ohio, or at Bennigans. My friends it was something that should have never left the kitchen at any restaurant, let alone the hot new happening trendy The Kitchen. It was actually so overdone that we were laughing. I call over our server and she agreed that it was the opposite of the rare that I had ordered and that she acknowledged putting in to the kitchen.

Now we wait . . and wait. Mr. H is trying to eat his risotto one grain at a time so he will have something left on his plate when my meal is returned. He fails. Server comes back and apologizes "it is taking longer because chef wanted to cook a whole new piece of fish" Well, no kidding, did anyone think he was going to try and uncook the previous piece?! Rare tuna . . we are talking maybe a minute per side, correct?

Bus boy has now cleared the entire table. The tuna returns and has multiplied. To compensate, I guess, they have added a second filet to the portion. The tuna is now cooked correctly, but it is not sushi grade tuna, by any stretch. It is just not that good. Again, no seasoning. The tapenade -- cherry tomatoes sauteed in EVO with slices of garlic and black olives is tasty enough, but this is not "cooking"

Desserts are an unqualified success. Lemon tart is lemony, good buttery crust and sticky toffee pudding is yummy. We send our compliments to the pastry chef, whoever she is. Server brings us complimentary glasses of two different dessert wines which is a very nice and welcome touch on her part. Of course, she than promptly disappears so we cannot pay her! We wind up scraping together enough cash to leave on the table -- (how much staring into one another's eyes can a coupe married 15 years actually take) and stroll down Pearl Street. Content that we have given the Kitchen a fair shake, it is back to Bistro 1010 for us.

The beautiful people at the bar seem to have a wondeful time being beautiful with one another, chatting with the hostess and the bartender. If they can make enough money on the bar tabs, that's fine by me. Serious diners should look elsewhere.

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I am talking the kind of grey that you get if you are dumb enough to order tuna as your choice at a wedding banquet in, say Ohio, or at Bennigans.

ROTFL! :laugh:

Yes, just like my "medium" steak on my first visit.

In two trips, I really enjoyed the drinks and desserts (and the cheese & foie), but now I'm apprehensive about going back to sample more items unless they re-tool the menu.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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Don't be "apprehensive" rlm, you can hang with the other beautiful people at the bar and have beautiful drinks and beautiful conversation while eating cheese and fois gras . I won't hold it against you. :raz:

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The "beautiful people" crowd wasn’t there on our two trips, but we were there early both times and it wasn’t that busy. The bartender who served us was very nice and we didn’t feel ignored (or we probably would not have returned). Sounds like you had a much worse experience than even Sheehan.

“When I was dating and the wine list was presented to my male companion, I tried to ignore this unfortunate faux pas. But this practice still goes on…Closing note to all servers and sommeliers: please include women in wine selection. Okay?”--Alpana Singh, M.S.-"Alpana Pours"

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