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Think Pink - Rose Confessions


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A beautiful early spring day took us down to the lake for lunch today and the menu of carpaccio, rucola and fresh cheeses seemed to call for the bottle of 2003 D'Alfonso del Sordo, Posta Arignano, San Severo Rosato (montepulciano/sangiovese) that was waiting at cool cellar temperature. The match was perfect with the bright dry fruity flavors matching perfectly with the food.

I have become a true convert to the robust, dry rose wines from Puglia, Abruzzo and Sicilia and have loved the great pink wines of Tavel and Bandol for decades.

What are your favorite rose wines? Confess your pink passions.

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Sigh. I keep hoping someone will find a way to import the Moroccan roses. When I was there five years ago I fell madly in love with some beautifully light, dry wines from Celliers de Meknes. Never imagined thinking of a rose as "crisp," but crisp these undoubtedly were. Gris le President is the only name that leaps to mind at the moment, and it may not be exactly accurate; I do have the labels filed somewhere, though - must hunt 'em up and list 'em here. Not that it'll do any good, I suppose, but it will be a pleasure to see them again.

[EDIT for additional crispness....]

Edited by balmagowry (log)
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Last summer in Vacqueyras we could see the village bell-tower -- the clocher -- from our bedroom window. The same clocher was on the lable of pink stuff that became our primary cooling medium during the record-breaking heat, at 15 euros a half-case or something ridiculously cheap.

Alas, Vacqueyras La Clocher is unavailable in the U.S. But, after throwing away uncounted dollars trying to find out where good rose came from, I finally learned that Cote du Provence, Cote du Ventoux (Tavel and Bandol always seem a little pricy, to me) and anything from the villages around Vacqueyras generally do a proper job balancing fruit and acidity, and produce a great, crisp, summer wine that does not taste like white zinfandel. Looking forward to the arriveal of the rose season -- and to checking out the pinks from Puglia et al.

Edited to add the word "crisp", because balmagowry got it right.

Edited by Busboy (log)

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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Ha - found a few labels, though precious little other info. Celliers de Meknes does have a web site, but it appears to be down at the moment - not too promising. Anyway, I was conflating two different wines, and there were three altogether which caught my fancy. The mysterious Cuvee du President - at least, it seems mysterious to me now because it doesn't seem to have anything in common (not even nationality) with the one turned up by Google just now. Then the Celliers de Meknes Cuvee speciale - blast, torn label, no further details. The third was also from Celliers de Meknes, but it wasn't really a rose - Guerrouane gris Trois Domaines. There is in fact a Gerrouane rose, much heavier and sweeter - it's the gris that was so "crisp," and no wonder! (I also stumbled across this note from last September which suggests they've been having a problem with "maderisation" - can only hope it's been, or being, overcome.)

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My favorite lately that I'm about to put back on the by-the-glass list for warmer weather is Domaine de la Courtade Cotes de Provence L'Alycastre Rose. The wine is made on the island of Porquerolles, in the Mediterranean off the coast of Nice. Domaine de la Courtade are the only vineyards and winery on the island, the rest of the unspoiled beauty of the island being taken up by a nature preserve. Made from Mourvedre and a splash of Rolle. Pale salmon in hue, very dry, with aromas of rose petals, citrus and ocean breezes. A bit of spice revealed on the way down. This stuff just screams SUMMER WINE and PROVENCE. :wub: It's an unbelievable bargain at about 10 bucks and really outclasses Tavel or Bandol by a mile, IMHO.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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My favorite ros\'es are the

Spaetburgunder Weissherbst's fron Baden. They're not imported since the locals drink it up. The best I've ever had was (from my travel notes) a 1983 Oberbergen Bassgeiger Kabinett:

Lake Garda ros\'es. Not found here but we get excellent white Lugana's (obtainable in the USA) from the Lake Garda region. I'd be very interested in Craig Camp's comment on the Lake Garda wines.

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My favorite ros\'es are the

Spaetburgunder Weissherbst's fron Baden. They're not imported since the locals drink it up. The best I've ever had was (from my travel notes) a 1983 Oberbergen Bassgeiger Kabinett:

Lake Garda ros\'es.  Not found here but we get excellent white Lugana's (obtainable in the USA) from the Lake Garda region. I'd be very interested in Craig Camp's comment on the Lake Garda wines.

Pirate:

Thanks for reminding me of another fave! Corte Gardoni Bardolino Chiaretto. Delicious stuff this is. Also not terribly expensive. Last year this was running about $11.00/bottle. Much deeper and bolder color and flavor than its seemingly anemic (by contrast) cousins from France. This is pink wine with cojones. :biggrin:

My favorite domestic rose is Unti Vineyards Grenache Rose. A bit pricier than it's European brethren at around $25 (at least here in PA), but this stuff is the bomb diggety! There's a case of the 2002 waiting for me at our state warehouse which I intend to pick up tomorrow. I had originally ordered it for a special event at the restaurant and then we changed our minds about carrying all different wine for just that one evening. My purveyor had burned through quite a bit of mojo to secure this for me so I felt very badly about it and decided I'd just pay for it myself and keep it, rather than send it back. Last year only 3 bottles made it to Striped Bass and they were some of the only ones on the entire east coast. Production is pretty low (only 249 cases in the 2002 vintage!) since they really drop a lot of crop to limit yield, but the quality on this is incredible. Bone dry and really full bodied. Undoubtedly the biggest rose I've ever tried at 14.5% alcohol. Incredibly versatile with food too. If anyone sees this available in their area, jump on it! I don't think you'll be disappointed.

Also fairly readily available domestic is the Joseph Phelps Vin du Mistral rose. This is from a very reliable producer and is very Tavel in style. Pedroncelli makes a Zinfandel Rose that I'm dying to try. Anyone familiar with it?

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I definitely go with Busboy on the Cotes du Ventoux Rosés. We've stayed a few times near the foot of Mont Ventoux and developed a taste for them. What's even better is that they do make the trip back home well and still taste nice!

The one we brought back last time is Perle de Rosée from Chateau Pesquié (near Mormoiron for anyone visiting the area).

I don't know how available their wines are in the UK or USA, but I know that they do seem to be keen on advertising Cotes du Ventoux abroad, so it may be possible to buy them outside France. (If we can't get any in the UK we'll have to wait until September to get some more and we only have one bottle left!)

They also do some very nice reds and an interesting Viognier.

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I happily confess to having not one bottle of rose in the cellar, although I do occasionally drink one. The wines that appeal to me the most are from Bandol, with Domaine Tempier making one of the most serious roses around. This isn't really summer quaffing stuff, it has the grip and structure of a good white wine. Chateau Pibarnon also make a good rose. Outside of Bandol my knowledge is limited. I know I've come across more poor bottles than good ones where rose is concerned.

BWs

Chris Kissack

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My favorite roses are mostly Anjous. Every year I have a different favorite cheapie; the Marc Angeli is always stunning if pricey. I'm also fond of the Lopez de Heredia roses from Rioja.

--- Lee

Seattle

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I'm a big fan of the Australina Roses; The turkeys Flat, Margan and Charles Melton ones are all very good.

'You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.'

- Frank Zappa

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Some of my favorite roses are:

Italy

Bisson Cerasuolo Rose

Cantalupo "Il Mimo" Nebbiolo Rose

Muri-Gries Lagrien Rose

France

JM Raffault Chinon Rose

Renardat-Fache Cerdon de Bugy - Lightly sweet and petillant

Tempier Bandol Rose

Bart Marsannay Rose

Gour de Chaule Gigondas Rose

Greece

Kir-Yianni Xynamavro Rose

Tatsis Negoska Rose

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I seem to enjoy Rose` wines more than I realize.

South African Goats do Roam 2002 by Fiarview.

France's Tavel 2001 by Paul Jaboulet Ainee

Lebanon's Chateau Ksara 2000 from the Bekaa valey.

Spain's Marques de Caceres Rioja Rose' 2001.

Several Greek wines fall into the "enjoyed" category namel the Apelia Rose by Kourtakis and the Amathystos Rose from Ktima Kosta Lazaridi.

Enjoyed Antinori's fairly simple Cipressi.

Most interesting I find the Greek Rose' wines as they tend to both age and use dif. grape varieties providing a fairly large array of flavors and the Lebanese assomblage.

The fact that the goats "selected" 48% Cinsault, 16% Grenache, 12% Carignan, 9% Merlot, 6.5% Gamay Noir, 3% Shirax, 2% Pinot Noir, 2% Pinotage, 1% Chardonnay and 1/2% Semillon is worth noting thogh certain aspects of the wines behave more "redish" than what Rose' wines are expected of.

Andre Suidan

I was taught to finish what I order.

Life taught me to order what I enjoy.

The art of living taught me to take my time and enjoy.

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I'll second the Cantalupo "Il Mimo". Good stuff.

The Chivite rosé from Spain is very nice for its $5-6 price.

I like the Cerdon de Bugey ,too, but it's a wine to itself- not your typical rosé.

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Any recs on pink sparklers? Maybe it's a girl thing, but I love pink with bubbles.

If you don't mind some sweetness, the Renardat-Fache Cerdon de Bugy someone cited earlier is a very nice, very different lightly sparkling wine. Hard to find, but good deal at $15-18.

I like the Pol Roger Brut Rosé (down to my last '90), but that's getting into more expensive territory ($45-55). And like Craig I consider it a bit "macho" in the Champagne spectrum.

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Bonny Doon produces a pink wine that I really like: Vin Gris de Cigare.

From their website:

MARSANNE ATTACKS! the palate in a very gentle fashion and we’ve included a generous dollop of it in this classic southern French inspired cuvée.  Our ’02 Vin Gris is an exercise in the usual refreshingly fruity aromatics that one typically finds in a proper pink – strawberry and rose with perhaps a subliminal suggestion of linden flower and lime blossom.  There is a wonderful creaminess and sophistication to this year’s pink.  Still absolutely perfect with the whole Mediterranean palate – tomatoes, capers, olives, eggplant, you know the drill.

Actually, talk about terroir: I believe there are subliminal hints of cannabis sativa that manifest in the wine. (Bonny Doon, in Santa Cruz county, is an old dope growers/dealers hangout.)

It's just lovely. Retails at $11. And I see they've got a new Big House Pink (to go with their Big House Red and White line). We'll have to try that one, too.

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Bonny Doon produces a pink wine that I really like: Vin Gris de Cigare.

From their website:

MARSANNE ATTACKS! the palate in a very gentle fashion and we’ve included a generous dollop of it in this classic southern French inspired cuvée.  Our ’02 Vin Gris is an exercise in the usual refreshingly fruity aromatics that one typically finds in a proper pink – strawberry and rose with perhaps a subliminal suggestion of linden flower and lime blossom.  There is a wonderful creaminess and sophistication to this year’s pink.  Still absolutely perfect with the whole Mediterranean palate – tomatoes, capers, olives, eggplant, you know the drill.

Actually, talk about terroir: I believe there are subliminal hints of cannabis sativa that manifest in the wine. (Bonny Doon, in Santa Cruz county, is an old dope growers/dealers hangout.)

It's just lovely. Retails at $11. And I see they've got a new Big House Pink (to go with their Big House Red and White line). We'll have to try that one, too.

An old dope growers/dealers hangout? The implication being that area no longer has cannabis as a cash crop? I've heard from more than one winemaker that cannabis grows quite effectively between grapevines. In fact the Foris Vineyards "Fly Over Red" is named for the little narc planes that would "fly over" that area of Oregon seeking amateur botany projects. :raz:

Thanks for reminding me about the Vin Gris de Cigare. Also a fave. And I'll definitely want to try the Big House Pink. Hadn't heard about it before and I really love the red and the white.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I love Tavels in the Spring and summer.

Pierre Gaillards Rose Pourpre and Jaboulets Tavel L'Espiegle are two I look for.

Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

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I like all sorts of rosé, especially in the summertime when we're having lighter entrées like salads and grilled fish.

For lighter rosés, I like Marques de Caçeras (Spain) and Chateau Routas (France).

For more full-bodied rosé, I go for Charles Melton "Rose of Virginia" (Australia) or Garretson Wine Company's "The Celeidh" (Paso Robles).

I feel sorry for people who turn their nose up to a thirst-quenching rosé. It's perfect with a number of foods and you rarely have to pay more than $10 for a really, really good one.

"Enjoy every sandwich."

Warren Zevon, 10/30/02

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An old dope growers/dealers hangout?  The implication being that area no longer has cannabis as a cash crop? 

No, just that all the dealers are old now. :laugh:

:rolleyes:

Of course - how silly of me! I forget my contemporries are aging right along with me sometimes... :smile:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Although I really like Provencal rose's (and rose' champagne is a topic all its own) my world takes me to California offerings most often. Most Pinot producers try their hand at rose' but I find them a little to "tutti-frutti". I'm liking the VERDAD (sister winery to Qupe') rose of Grenache and splash of Tempranillo.

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