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markovitch

Making Your Own Condiments

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Put the finished mustard back in the (washed and scalded) jar, cap tightly and store in fridge.

If the jars are properly sanitized and the filled jars placed in a water bath afterwards, can the unopened mustard be stored in non-refrigerated storage?

Nice recipe, Ihope to try it soon.

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Here's my recipe . . . no cooking or sterilizing involved. I make a cup or two at a time and store it in the fridge. It goes quickly. Generally, I make this mustard and my Sun-Dried Tomato Catsup to serve with our Renegade Burgers, or the slow-roasted beef sandwiches we always make for our Superbowl Party, which we serve with a beef au jus spiked with slivers of garlic and jalapeno.

Viognier-French Tarragon Mustard

Fresh and spicy, with an intriguing hint of licorice

1/2 cup brown mustard seed (available from Penzey’s Spices)

1/4 cup viognier or other fruity white wine

1/4 cup chicken broth

1 tablespoon brown sugar

4 sprigs fresh tarragon, destemmed and finely chopped

1/4 teaspoon fresh cardamom seed, crushed (optional)

Makes about 1 cup

Place the mustard seed, white wine, and chicken broth in a glass bowl, stir until the seeds sink, and refrigerate overnight. The following day crush the mustard seed in a food processor or coffee grinder until well-broken, to a rough mustard consistency. Pulse and then pat down with a spoon, pulse and repeat. The seeds tend to fly around and are too small for most electric processors, so the mustard will still have lots of whole seeds. Add the brown sugar, tarragon, and cardamom seed, and pulse some more. (For a speedier version, you can grind the dry seeds and then add the liquids, but the flavor is richer and the texture more interesting if you take the time to soak the seeds first.) The final mustard will be super-strong and very crunchy. Store in a clean glass jar or plastic container. Keeps for 2 weeks, refrigerated. Use sparingly on sandwiches or as a condiment for meats.

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Here's my recipe . . . no cooking or sterilizing involved.  I make a cup or two at a time and store it in the fridge.  It goes quickly.  Generally, I make this mustard and my Sun-Dried Tomato Catsup to serve with our Renegade Burgers, or the slow-roasted beef sandwiches we always make for our Superbowl Party, which we serve with a beef au jus spiked with slivers of garlic and jalapeno.

Thanks for posting the mustard recipe.

Now how about the recipe for the Sun-Dried Tomato Catsup? Pretty please?

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Toliver, here you go. Thanks for asking!

Sundried Tomato Catsup

Sundried tomatoes give this homemade catsup an exotic smoky flavor that’s great with burgers and roast beef sandwiches.

1 29 oz. can tomato sauce

3 tablespoons brown sugar or molasses

1/3 cup white wine

1/3 cup chopped, sundried tomatoes in oil

2 tablespoons oil from sundried tomatoes

4-5 cloves garlic, peeled, roasted and mashed

1 tablespoon fresh grated ginger root

1/4 teaspoon sea salt

1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black peppercorn

Makes about 1 ½ cups

Roast or sauté the garlic, then mash. Roasted garlic tastes best, but if you’re in a hurry, just sauté it for 5 minutes in one teaspoon olive oil until soft and aromatic. Combine all ingredients and bring to a boil over medium heat. Immediately lower the heat so that the sauce barely bubbles, and simmer for 1-2 hours, until reduced by about one-third. Allow to cool. Store in a clean jar or plastic container. Keeps for about two weeks, refrigerated.

I'm going to work on a version of Andie's mustard for Christmas baskets. Thanks, Andie!

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Put the finished mustard back in the (washed and scalded) jar, cap tightly and store in fridge. 

If the jars are properly sanitized and the filled jars placed in a water bath afterwards, can the unopened mustard be stored in non-refrigerated storage?

Nice recipe, Ihope to try it soon.

Yes, that is the way I process them. The mustard itself is a preservative and will keep without refrigeration after opening as long as nothing is introduced into it that can spoil. In other words, use a clean spoon to take the mustard from the jar. Don't do as one of my friends did, use a knife to spread mayonnaise on a piece of bread then stick the same knife into the jar of mustard carrying a bit of mayonnaise along.

When I yelled about it, he said he would just keep the jar of mustard in the fridge. He had no idea why I was so upset.

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The final mustard will be super-strong and very crunchy. Store in a clean glass jar or plastic container. Keeps for 2 weeks, refrigerated. Use sparingly on sandwiches or as a condiment for meats.

This is the reason I microwave the mustard I make to adjust the flavor and lessen the bite.

When it is first mixed, it is so strong that it can irritate the stomach. Heating will lessen this effect and you can use more.

Your recipe sounds very flavorful.

My other reason for heating is that the mustard will then keep much longer. And of course with processing and sealing it will keep indefinitely.

I started growing my own many years ago. I was actully growing it for the greens but was away on a dog show circuit for a couple of weeks and the entire patch bolted (went to seed). I came home to 5 foot tall plants loaded with long seed pods.

The stuff grows like a weed and because of our long growing season I can get three crops a year.

I pick the leaves from the base of the plant while they are young so I actually get a double crop out of them. Nice!

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What a great thread!

Thanks for the ideas, everyone. I am a mustard junkie...my favorite condiment by far. I have no less than a dozen and a half jars in my fridge! :blink:

Thanks all,

Jean

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Perhaps I should have titled this "Condiments" - - -Why not, etc., etc., etc...

I plan on making a couple of Sambals as last evening I scraped the bottom of the jar of Sambal Badjak. I just ordered the more exotic ingredients which are difficult to find locally and hopefully they will arrive in time to make a batch this weekend.

I have a lot of green tomatoes so green tomato chutney is on the schedule.

Chile sauce will be on the list as the chiles and tomatoes ripen. I am still trying to duplicate the taste of my favorite sweet chile sauce made by Mae Ploy.

I have a liter jar of palm sugar which makes a big difference in the taste and texture of these condiments.

Fun to make and tasty, all of these flavor enhancers.

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Perhaps I should have titled this "Condiments" - - -Why not, etc., etc., etc...

A great idea. PM the forum host to see if they can edit it for you.

And thanks for posting your recipes and ideas! This is a great discussion.

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andiesenji:

I am a mustard freak! My favorite by far is the very simple, savory French Dijons. In many attempts my mustard never quite loses the "bite" referred to in this thread. People always think it is a challenge to get mustard really hot when in fact it is difficult to get it mild. If the microwave method works, would the range top work just as well for larger batches? At what point has it cooked too long? I've never had much luck with the cooking method so I am very curious as to the details. Can you explain your double boiler technique further?

RM

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andiesenji:

I am a mustard freak! My favorite by far is the very simple, savory French Dijons. In many attempts my mustard never quite loses the "bite" referred to in this thread. People always think it is a challenge to get mustard really hot when in fact it is difficult to get it mild. If the microwave method works, would the range top work just as well for larger batches? At what point has it cooked too long? I've never had much luck with the cooking method so I am very curious as to the details. Can you explain your double boiler technique further?

RM

I do make my own mustard in large batches but I gave the measurements for a small batch because I thought that not everyone would want to make several pints at a time for canning.

I have found that I have much more control using the microwave and if I could get my photos up you could see the size of the bowl I use.

That being said, you don't need a regular double boiler. A wide stainless steel bowl works best, set over simmering water in a pot that is of a size to keep the bottom of the bowl above the water but allow it to sit deep enough that it is stable.

As the mustard is heating, stir it a few times and when it becomes hot, stir constantly and when it changes color and begins to look a bit "slick" take the bowl from the pot and place it on a thick towel. Continue stirring a bit until it begins to cool. Taste it, it is best to put a dab on a water cracker or a bread cube. If it still has the effect that you feel in your sinuses, cook it a bit more. Every batch is different and you have to taste as you go.

If you have a very heavy-bottomed, non-stick skillet you can also cook it over direct heat but you have to be very quick, moving it on and off low heat while constantly stirring. This is tricky but much faster than the double boiler method.

Regarding the creamy mustards, you have to grind the dry seed to make this, unless you have a wet mill.

I advise anyone who is going to grind dry mustard seed (or very hot chiles) in one of the electric "spice" grinders to either take it outside or place it inside a jumbo plastic bag before opening the grinder, or wear a dust mask (and safety goggles). Invariable when you pull the top off the grinder some of the powder poofs up and zowie!

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ImageGullet is working so here are my mustard photos.

Newly threshed mustard seed

i8751.jpg

A close up of the seeds: Black, brown and yellow.

i8750.jpg

Six quarts of mustard seed soaking in the vinegar mixture:

i8752.jpg

A Pyrex bowl in which the partially processed mustard, ground in a Vita-Mix blender and has been microwaved and stirred until it is partially tempered. It will be set aside to mature for a few days then tasted and if needed further heating to lessen the bite if still too strong. It will then be combined with other ingredients and canned.

i8753.jpg

Shown side by side so the color change can be seen.

i8754.jpg

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I love this thread, my mother and I are the "condiment queens"....

I recently bought a product called "kuchela" from an internaional foods store, It is an unripe mango pickle with hot peppers and a blend of "east indian spices" from Trinidad. it is incredible my new favorite, i eat it with turkey burgers, add it vinagrettes, mayonaise etc. my thought is, it would be amazing to make it fresh, so I found a recipe:

http://www.tntisland.com/kuchela.html

This would be a large undertaking so I ask you egulleters, condiment makers, people who know about mustard oil--any advice?

do you think I can put this up in jars after I make it?

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Excellent photos, andie, and very helpful! We have a creek bed full of tall mustard, and I think this would be a fun project to do with our 12-year-old (although I suspect I may need to buy some seed to supplement our efforts). We can put up the mustard in small jars for him to give as Christmas gifts.

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This would be a large undertaking so I ask you egulleters, condiment makers, people who know about mustard oil--any advice?

do you think I can put this up in jars after I make it?

There is this thread about Mustard oil in the India forum from a couple of years back.

http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=9168

I buy mustard oil at an Indian grocery.

I don't see why you couldn't put this up in jars after you make it. You have to use a hot water bath as you would any other canned item. I will check and see if I can find anything more about it as soon as I can find what I did with the cookbook that has all the salsas, sambals, chutneys and etc.

I note that this is not cooked. I would process the garlic in vinegar before adding it to the mixture, only because of the possibility of botulism. The waterbath method does not heat the garlic enough to kill the organism, however high acidity will.

When I make sambals or other condiments I will not be cooking, I roast the garlic in oil before I add it to the mixture. The flavor is simply richer and there is no possibility of botulism.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

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Don't forget the relishes, barbecue sauces, soya sauces, and ketchups! :biggrin:

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In a future post I will relate my "interesting" adventure in making banana ketchup..... :biggrin:

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Ba-nan-a! That is creative. Now I'm dying to know why, and what for . . . and how did it turn out?

That reminds me (warped minds think alike) I made a yellow tomato catsup the other day, mostly by accident, but it turned out well. I had more chicken marinade than I needed--a simple base of olive oil, herbs, white wine and various spices, so I saved back a cup and blended it with the only tomatoes I had in the house--canned yellow--and reduced it on the stove for a while, after adding a little Cajun spice and some fresh ground ginger. My SO swore he wouldn't touch the stuff, but I put a dollop by his chicken anway, and when I took the plates back to the kitchen I noticed it was gone. Must have eaten it accidentally, too. :wink:

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We are fortunate here in Lancaster in that we have a number of "ethnic" markets, including Thai, Korean and Phillipino, as well as an Indian market in Palmdale, just next door.

I love banana ketchup, I began buying it quite a few years ago, picked up a bottle on a whim and found it good.

Another shopper in the store happened to remark that she made her own and would I like the recipe.... Well of course I would, no doubt about it. She invited me to her home and copied the recipe for me from a notebook that had seen a lot of kitchen action.

A few weeks later I gathered the ingredients and set out to make a batch of my very own banana ketchup.

The directions said it would make about two cups and to refrigerate for up to a week. I thought, heck, why not make a bigger batch and can it.

so I made a bigger batch, I canned it and processed it in a waterbath and put it in the pantry. One jar was in the fridge being consumed with anything and everything that goes good with ketchup.

One evening, I heard what I thought was a backfire, thought nothing more of it. A short time later a louder bang, accompanined by additional noises, tinkling sounds, hail on a tin roof, etc.

Also my dogs were scratching at the pantry door.

I opened the door and it looked like someone had been butchered in it. Red gloppy stuff was everywhere. One jar was intact so I put it in three plastic bags and relegated it to the trash where it also exploded.

I hired a cleaning crew to come in and clean the pantry, I simply was not up to it.

Did I make it again? Yes. However after this fiasco I processed it in the pressure cooker. No problems, no fermentation.

Do you still want the recipe??????

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Um, yes? But I'll follow the most recent directions carefully!! :blink:

Thanks!

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Banana ketchup recipe

2 bananas, large.

1 1/4 cups water

1/4 cup sultanas plumped in 1/4 cup water

1/2 chopped onion

2 cloves garlic

1/4 cup tomato paste

3/4 cup apple cider vinegar

1/2 cup palm sugar (or dark brown sugar)

1/4 cup Golden syrup (or light corn syrup)

2 tablespoons dark rum

1 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 teaspoon allspice, freshly ground

1/4 teaspoon hot red pepper, ground

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon, ground

1/4 teaspoon black pepper, ground

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg, ground

Chop peeled bananas and toss in blender with water. Blend till smooth.

Scrape into micro-waveable glass bowl and set aside

Add the sultanas in their liquid to the blender, then add the onion, garlic, tomato paste and vinegar.

Blend well and add to bananas in bowl.

Heat in microwave, full strength for 2 minutes

Add the sugar, syrup, rum, stir well.

Microwave for 3 minutes and stir well

Mix the spices together and add to the mixture in the bowl.

Blend thoroughly.

Microwave for 5 minutes and stir thoroughly, scraping the sides of the bowl to mix everything.

Repeat this process three or four times until the ketchup has reduced by 1/3 and is thickened to the correct consistency.

This may take longer in very humid conditions.

You may have to continue the microwave/stirring routine several additional times until the consistency is the way you expect ketchup to be.

Allow to cool and place in blender, blend until totally smooth.

When finished place in a sterilized glass jar.

Allow to cool and store in the fridge for no more than two weeks.

To make a spicier ketchup chop a small dried hot chile and soak in the water with the raisins.

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So, Episure,

What kind of mustard do you make?

dill, green chilli, horseradish, star anise, sichuan pepper, raw mango, ginger.....

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oh my, bananna ketchup sounds devine! how is the bottled product? worth it to buy?

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oh my, bananna ketchup sounds devine! how is the bottled product? worth it to buy?

I like it, it is a bit spicier than our "regular" ketchup but actually has a smoother taste.

I especially like it blended with mayonnaise or Miracle Whip (I know, I know, but it has its uses) to make the "Russian dressing" popular in the 40s and 50s.

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And here is one of the chutneys I make that is hot and spicy. It is a good basic recipe, you can substitute other fruit, increase the heat by using hotter peppers, or leave them out entirely if you do not like the heat.

This chutney is excellent with poultry and meats and is particularly good with cheeses.

Tiny cheese tarts topped with a dollop of this chutney make nice little starters.

This is an original family recipe, not from any cookbook.

Hot & Spicy Peach/Lime/Ginger chutney

2 cups 5% acid strength cider vinegar

1/4 cup fresh lime juice, pulp included

Zest from the lime

5 pounds peaches nearly ripe peaches

2 or 3 hot banana peppers, roasted and peeled, seeded. (other hot yellow peppers may be substituted)

1 lemon, peeled, quartered, seeded, and diced

Zest from the lemon

1/2 pound Sultanas or golden raisins

1/2 pound dried white or other light colored figs, finely chopped

1/2 cup finely chopped nuts (optional) pecans, walnuts or pistachios

3 cups sugar (Splenda may be substituted for reduced sugar product)

1/2 cup candied ginger, coarsely chopped (or 2 tsp ground ginger)

Mix cider vinegar, lime juice, pulp and zest in a 5 quart or larger non-reactive stock pot. Glass, enamel, SS or anodized aluminum. Do not use plain alumnum. This is easy to make in a large crockpot, less chance of scorching.

Blanch peaches in boiling water for half a minute, immediately transfer to iced water. Skins should slip off easily.

Chop peaches into 1/2 inch pieces and add to vinegar mixture.

Blister the pepper skins over a flame, remove skin , split and seed peppers, chop finely.

Add to peach/vinegar mixture.

Mix together the lemon, Sultanas, figs and nuts (if used) and add to the peach/pepper/vinegar mixture.

Place the pot over medium heat and bring to a simmer, stir every few minutes. Reduce heat to low and continue cooking and stirring until peaches are tender and appear translucent.

Add the sugar or Splenda and the ginger, continue cooking, stirring often until the liquid has reduced and chutney has thickened. This will take about 1 1/2 hours.

Meanwhile, wash and sterilize 5 pint canning jars, and the lids. Place the jars into a wire canning rack in canning kettle.

When the chutney is finished cooking, immediately ladle into the jars, using a canning funnel to keep the jar rim clean. Fill to within 1/4 inch of the top. Make sure rim is clean and dry, wipe with a dry cloth if necessary.

Place the lids on the jars, then the rings, but do not tighten.

Place canning kettle on burner, pour boiling water into kettle to within 1 inch of top of jars.

Turn on burner and when water returns to boiling, set timer for 15 minutes.

At end of 15 minutes, remove from water bath and place on thick towel. Using another towel, tighten lid ring. Allow jars to cool on towel, you will hear the lids "ping" as they cool down and will see a dimple in the center of the lid. This shows the seal is intact.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

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