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How long will this roast take?


melkor
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We're roasting a whole strip loin for Passover (tomorrow) - It's 15lbs untrimmed, I'm expecting it to be around 12lbs trimmed. Anyone have any bright ideas on how long this thing is going to take to cook? We'll start it in a very hot oven to get a crust going, lower the heat to 250 or 275 and wait for the alarm on the thermometer to go off. We may set the alarm low and finish the roast in a hot oven - the goal is to end up with a medium-rare roast after it rests, 10*F of carry-over is expected.

Looking online I've learned that this is likely to take between 2 and 7 hours which makes it hard to pick a time to toss it into the oven.

Any advice is good, even if it comes from rancho-gordo! :raz:

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You've probably figured out that with this shape, thickness matters a lot more than weight. Once the roast is browned, it's going to take around an hour, an hour and a half at the outside, at 250 F.

Rather than browning first, I'd consider starting it as low as 200 F. Cook it to an internal temperature of about 115 F (maybe two hours?), let it rest, then crank up the broiler to brown it at the end. You get much better control of the finished product, and much more evenly done (and juicier) meat throughout. Even better, cook it low and slow to 125 or 130 (you'll get less carryover from a low-temp process) and brown it with a torch.

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Not knowing about dietary restrictions, I would liberally rub with butter, lots of salt and pepper, roast at 500 for 22 min for rare, 25-27 for medium rare. Let rest 15 min at least to do carryover and re-absorb juices. This has worked flawlessly for me for 5 yrs. PS it helps to have a great kitchen fan as this high heat messes up an oven.

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Not knowing about dietary restrictions, I would liberally rub with butter

Hoo boy! That would be the modern-day equivalent of "seething a calf in its mothers milk" - and the prohibition against this very thing is the basis for kosher cooking/eating. But if one were to use olive oil, I bet your technique would be a gorgeous solution! I'll have to remember this! :rolleyes:

I'm a canning clean freak because there's no sorry large enough to cover the, "Oops! I gave you botulism" regrets.

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I'm with Dave, cook the roast slowly at 120 or 130 for 6 to 7 hours and finish under a hot broiler. However, if you need your oven for dishes, this makes it more difficult. However, this gives you a chance to work on the sides the day before, giving you more time with your guests the day of. But this tidbit of information may be a tad late to be helpful.

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Thanks for all the advice. The roast is trimmed and tied, it'll go into a 200*F oven in a few hours (after it rests on the counter for a while to come up to room temp). 2 hours or so in the oven - out for a while to rest, into the broiler to crust up a little while before it's served. It's just got a little olive oil, salt, and pepper rubbed on it - there is the beginning of a bordelaise sauce simmering on the stove.

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