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nessa

Say that again?

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I was just thinking about how some words in the food world are mispronounced. Or at least pronounced far differently than I've ever heard. Now, this is not to disparage those who do pronounce things incorrectly, for whatever reason. Far be it from me to do so. However, these incidents did amuse me.

I have two stories.

One day I was in the mall, perusing lipsticks. I have a bit of a lipstick problem but that is neither here nor there. So there I was, trying a little dab of this and that on my wrist, comparing colors and textures. I was having trouble deciding, one was too purple, one to orange, I just wanted a perfect color, was that too much to ask?

The salesperson decided to give me a little help and said here, try this one from Lancome "Mat Cog Knack` ". How odd, I thought. What an awkward sounding name. I upended the tube, and there it read "Matte Cognac". My eyes widened, and I managed to no giggle. I bought it. To this day, every time I put it on, I still hear "Mat Cog Knack`".

The other story is set in one of my grocery stores. I saw some proscuitto on the shelf, but no price. A salesperson walked by, and I asked how much it was. She said that the "pros kweet oh" was such and such price.

I chuckled all the way to my car. I mean I can see why she pronounced it that way, but all the same it tickled me.

Anyone else had any similar experiences?

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Back in my waitron days I heard a couple debate whether to have a glass of "pea-nut no-ear" or a "mer-lott".


peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

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I had a friend who was a great cook, but in restaurants asked for kwitchie (quiche) and bri with a long i (Brie).


Ruth Dondanville aka "ruthcooks"

“Are you making a statement, or are you making dinner?” Mario Batali

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Not a mispronunciation, but almost certainly the result of one: a small deli/grocery in midtown NYC with a big sign advertising a SPACIAL price for PEPORNI. To me, of course, pepperoni has been Spatial Peporni ever since.

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What I like is when people mispronounce things, not because they are naive or ignorant of the correct pronunciation, but out of a mistaken sense of trying to "snob things up." My favorite was related by Mario Batali who remarked at the people who would come into his restaurants and specify their pasta "al DAHN-tay." The first thing that comes to mind is that ordering pasta is not like ordering a steak where you specify the degree of doneness. And, of course, if you have to remind the restaurant that you want your pasta al dente, you should probably choose another dish. The second question, relating to the pronunciation, is wondering why anyone would cook pasta in the style of the author of La Divina Commedia.


--

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What I like is when people mispronounce things, not because they are naive or ignorant of the correct pronunciation, but out of a mistaken sense of trying to "snob things up." 

i once heard lynne rosetto kaspar pronounce shallots as shu-LOTS. maybe i'm the one who gets it wrong, but i've always called them SHA-lits.

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only if there was an e at the end of the double t no?

i mean..that logic works for culottes.

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My waterloo was back in my advertising agency days. I was account supervisor on the Gino's hamburger account and had been pitched to the client as an all around food expert.

We were filming some commercials in LA and were having lunch at a trendy restaurant. A test-the-limits-of-the-expense-account kind of place. Beautiful outside dining terrace. People were looking at me, the certified gourmet, to order first. And I did.

The salad nicoise, which I'd never had before, struck my fancy. Unfortunately. I ordered it - pronouncing "coise" to rhyme with noise. Even my explanation that I was using an ancient French dialect didn't stop the laughter. The creative director at the time still seems to remember it whenever we get together.


Holly Moore

"I eat, therefore I am."

HollyEats.Com

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What I like is when people mispronounce things, not because they are naive or ignorant of the correct pronunciation, but out of a mistaken sense of trying to "snob things up."

or mispronounce to make a comment on the food - like my vegetarian friends

who call sausages "snaussages" (like the dog treat)

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Back in my waitron days I heard a couple debate whether to have a glass of "pea-nut no-ear" or a "mer-lott".

Heeheehee....once I overheard a couple asking about the "Far NEENTY" wine they were thinking about getting. Living in Napa, it just cracked me up at the time. I still think of that everytime I see it mentioned.

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Not a mispronunciation, but almost certainly the result of one: a small deli/grocery in midtown NYC with a big sign advertising a SPACIAL price for PEPORNI. To me, of course, pepperoni has been Spatial Peporni ever since.

OMG...that's hilarious :laugh:

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What I like is when people mispronounce things, not because they are naive or ignorant of the correct pronunciation, but out of a mistaken sense of trying to "snob things up." My favorite was related by Mario Batali who remarked at the people who would come into his restaurants and specify their pasta "al DAHN-tay." The first thing that comes to mind is that ordering pasta is not like ordering a steak where you specify the degree of doneness. And, of course, if you have to remind the restaurant that you want your pasta al dente, you should probably choose another dish. The second question, relating to the pronunciation, is wondering why anyone would cook pasta in the style of the author of La Divina Commedia.

I briefly had a girlfriend in college who was fluent in Spanish-- a fact she'd emphasize at every opportunity. Even a spin through the Taco Bell drive through would generate an over the top pronunciation of "burrito". :huh:

Notice the word "briefly" above.


peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...

-- A.B.

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From Baltimore, a local pronunciation and a misspelled sign from long ago:

Oyster is often pronounced to rhyme with "moisture" - sometimes just to be cute, sometimes in earnest.

Once there was a restaurant that had a hand-made sign saying,

"REST ROOMS FOR COSTUMERS ONLY."

Oddly, there was a theatrical supply company down the street.

Maybe the rest-rooms were for them.

BB


Food is all about history and geography.

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I went grocery shopping with my ex-sister-in-law once. She picked up a package of pasta "boaties" for a pasta salad she was going to make.

I'd also like to be the first one -- possibly in the history of the world -- to say, in print, that the word "onion" does not contain the letter 'g.'


Edited by Mudpuppie (log)

amanda

Googlista

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I'd also like to be the first one -- possibly in the history of the world -- to say, in print, that the word "onion" does not contain the letter 'g.'

In French it does.

And in Italian it has not one "L" but two! And don't even get me started on German with its "Z" and "W"


--

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I'd also like to be the first one -- possibly in the history of the world -- to say, in print, that the word "onion" does not contain the letter 'g.'

In French it does.

And what about Funyuns?


I'm hollywood and I approve this message.

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I'd also like to be the first one -- possibly in the history of the world -- to say, in print, that the word "onion" does not contain the letter 'g.'

In French it does.

And what about Funyuns?

I dunno, but something about Soupe Le Funyun Gratinee just doesn't work.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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i once heard lynne rosetto kaspar pronounce shallots as shu-LOTS....

I believe that's the British pronunciation.

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I dunno, but something about Soupe Le Funyun Gratinee just doesn't work.

No, no. For the Gratinee, we use Lipton's Onion Soup Mix (or Wyler's).


I'm hollywood and I approve this message.

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I'd also like to be the first one -- possibly in the history of the world -- to say, in print, that the word "onion" does not contain the letter 'g.'

In French it does.

And what about Funyuns?

Those have a 'g' in latin - translates as "fungus."

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