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Mulcahy

Making Limoncello

448 posts in this topic

Well I may need to reevaluate this idea a little since if I just add simple syrup after the infusion it will cut the proof down.

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I made a blood-orangello a few months back that was OK, but nothing special. My bergamocello (made with bergamot oranges) is one of the most amazing things have ever tasted (she said modestly). Details and photos are over on the limoncello thread.

I'm doing a buddha's hand infusion right now, which I may or may not turns into a 'cello.

In general, I would say that you want oranges with interesting-smelling skin (preferably as soon off the tree as possible), rather than those with good-tasting fruit.

~A


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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I made a blood-orangello a few months back that was OK, but nothing special. My bergamocello (made with bergamot oranges) is one of the most amazing things  have ever tasted (she said modestly). Details and photos are over on the limoncello thread.

I'm doing a buddha's hand infusion right now, which I may or may not turns into a 'cello.

In general, I would say that you want oranges with interesting-smelling skin (preferably as soon off the tree as possible), rather than those with good-tasting fruit.

~A

This is what I was thinking. The flavor in a "-cello" is from the zest, not the juice, so I'm not so sure how something like Blood Orange would translate, given that the flavor is in the fruit.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I made a blood orange ratafia based on a Clementine Ratafia recipe I found on the web. It was quite nice and very attractively colored. A little Star Anise is a really nice flavor combination with the flavors of the blood oranges.

However, it went off rather quickly after making, so I don't think I got the alcohol where it needed to be or perhaps wasn't careful enough in my sterilization.

Vin d'orange, also where you use the juice of the fruit, might be interesting with Blood Oranges.

The skins of Meyer Lemons are interestingly scented. Kind of musky and thyme-like. I may try a limoncello with them this year.

-Erik


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I made a blood orange ratafia based on a Clementine Ratafia recipe I found on the web.  It was quite nice and very attractively colored.  A little Star Anise is a really nice flavor combination with the flavors of the blood oranges.

However, it went off rather quickly after making, so I don't think I got the alcohol where it needed to be or perhaps wasn't careful enough in my sterilization.

Vin d'orange, also where you use the juice of the fruit, might be interesting with Blood Oranges.

The skins of Meyer Lemons are interestingly scented.  Kind of musky and thyme-like.  I may try a limoncello with them this year.

-Erik

What is ratafia? Sounds interesting.

And please report back in the Limoncello thread on your results with the Meyer lemons. I'm quite curious how that would turn out.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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What is ratafia?  Sounds interesting.

Liqueur traditions are so confusing.

For me one of the big distinctions are those that sweeten while infusing and those that sweeten after.

French, English, and American liqueurs almost always add sugar during the fruit infusion process, while Italian liqueurs almost always do not.

Ratafias fall among those that are sweetened while infusing. They are whole fruit liqueurs which are sweetened during the infusion process and are usually spiced.

So a typical citrus ratafia would be citrus juice, citrus zest, alcohol, sugar, and spices macerated for a couple months, filtered and then bottled.

If you search for Clementine Ratafia on the internet you will certainly come up with the recipe I found.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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All other things being equal, organic is preferable for preparations that involve zests or unpeeled fruit.


Edited by carswell (log)

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Sorry to join this thread so late, but I'm rather new to eGullet and just found this discussion.... Anyway, I wanted to share some information that perhaps sheds light on the reason for the inclusion of the lime in Katie's recipe.

In Arthur Schwartz's excellent book, "Naples at Tables," he offers a recipe for limoncello; here is an excerpt from the headnote:

"Campanian recipes usually call for a couple or a few green lemons (not limes) along with the yellow, as the greener lemons are the most fragrant, while the yellow the most flavorful. In the United States, it's difficult to find still-green lemons, but mottled green and yellow ones are often in the supermarket bins. Choose them."

So perhaps Katie's lime is there both for its appearance -- to simulate the color of the green lemons -- and for its fragrance, which is perhaps more akin to the green lemons.

If anyone can find some green or mottled green lemons, it would be interesting to see how they affect the flavor.

As for Schwartz's own recipe, he calls for 2 pounds of lemons (peeled with a swivel-bladed peeler) a quart of grain alcohol, and a sugar syrup from 6 c water + 2.5 c sugar. (On the page previous to this recipe he gives a recipe for Liquore di Fragole -- Strawberry Liqueur -- that sounds delicious!)

Steven

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A little Star Anise is a really nice flavor combination with the flavors of the blood oranges.

OK, that's kinda creepy. Did I mention that I added a very quick infusion of star anise to my blood-orangecello in an effort to give it some oomph? I agree, it's a nice combo.

~A


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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OK, that's kinda creepy. Did I mention that I added a very quick infusion of star anise to my blood-orangecello in an effort to give it some oomph? I agree, it's a nice combo.

~A

Well, as long as you don't tell me you started sugar plum and dapple dandy pluot liqueurs this summer, I will just chalk it up to great minds thinking alike.

:raz:

I know you also did a Nocino or Vin de Noix.

We might have to have a neighborhood home made liqueur taste off!

Pomegranates just started showing up last week, so that is my next target...Gotta get some more jars, though.

-Erik


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Currently infusing: Nocino, buddha's hand 'cello, and a small batch of plum brandy. :biggrin:

(I can claim prior impetus, as I also made the plums last year.... :smile:)


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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Just started a batch using absolut 100 proof vodka, 10 lemons and 2 limes. I didn't have organic fruit, so I soaked them for an hour and scrubbed them. Hopefully it'll be ok. The wait to find out will suck.

What am i gonna do with all these zestless lemons?

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What am i gonna do with all these zestless lemons?

Make a syrup with the juice and add some ginger liqueur. Mix smallish quantities of the result with tonic water. (I used 1 cup juice : 2/3 cup sugar : 1/2 cup liqueur when I did this.)

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What am i gonna do with all these zestless lemons?

Off the top of my head:

Lemonade, Aviation cocktails, Lemon Drop cocktails, Sidecar cocktails, marinades, salad dressing, tabouleh...

-Erik


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I juice them and freeze the juice in ice cube trays, so I've always got a couple of tablespoonsful when I need them.


Life is short. Eat the roasted cauliflower first.

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My experimental orangecello (using Katie's recipe) has been a huge hit.

I'm planning on making up more, plus limecello and maybe grapefruitcello to see how that works out. I'm planning on buying 375ml bottles from my local home brew store and give them out as Christmas/hostess gifts. Maybe even in sets of three for people I really life with funky labels and bows!

I feel vaguely like an alcoholic Martha Stewart.

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check out sunday's new york times magazine. Two articles on 'cello making. Amanda hesser writes up a limoncello recipe in the NYT mag and in the Style magazine there is a blood orange liquer recipe. Anything with Blood orange has got to be good

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What am i gonna do with all these zestless lemons?

Off the top of my head:

Lemonade, Aviation cocktails, Lemon Drop cocktails, Sidecar cocktails, marinades, salad dressing, tabouleh...

-Erik

Defy tradition and add the juice of one lemon to your 'cello. It doesn't make it too tart, but it adds lovely lemoniness. Without the juice I find 'cello too sweet.

We're picking the last of the Asian Pears from the tree in the back yard and are considering a maceration in brandy. That's the great thing about these infusions -- it's All Good.

Did mandarin orange 'cello last year. Yum.


Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

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I want to make Esrog-cello.

I'm friend's with a California citron grower (the only one in the US I believe). If you decide to go commercial with your Esrog-cello and want a connection let me know. :)

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Given the rather large amount of Louisiana satsuma mandarins I currently have in my possession, I have sacrifced a number of them to the infusion gods, and am in the process of making a Satsuma Vodka -- which I will turn into a 'cello, and a Satsuma Rum.

I figure in 2 weeks I will have some really nice stuff for Chanukah and New Years Eve imbibing.

The Vodka infusion I have used the fruit and the rind, and in the rum, I have used just the fruit wedges, to start off. We'll see how it comes out. In a few days over the course of eating more satsumas I may just throw some peel into the rum as well.

I'm chancing using the entire peel as opposed to just the zest because the pith layer in satsuma peels is very thin, and a small amount of bitterness probably won't be bad.


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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Given the rather large amount of Louisiana satsuma mandarins I currently have in my possession, I have sacrifced a number of them to the infusion gods, and am in the process of making a Satsuma Vodka -- which I will turn into a 'cello, and a Satsuma Rum.

I figure in 2 weeks I will have some really nice stuff for Chanukah and New Years Eve imbibing.

The Vodka infusion I have used the fruit and the rind, and in the rum, I have used just the fruit wedges, to start off. We'll see how it comes out. In a few days over the course of eating more satsumas I may just throw some peel into the rum as well.

I'm chancing using the entire peel as opposed to just the zest because the pith layer in satsuma peels is very thin, and a small amount of bitterness probably won't be bad.

I'm looking forward to the report on how this turns out, Jason! Especially any batches that use the full peel.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Figured I'd bump this thread since we are now heading into prime citrus season.

Pomelo's were so beautiful and fragrant this last week at the farmers' market, I had to grab one and start an infusion for a pom-cello. Just from the smell of the house when I was zesting, I think this will be tasty.

Also need to start a double batch of eureka or lisbon lemons for limoncello.

It's funny, now every time I use a lemon or other citrus without zesting it first, I get this twinge, like I'm wasting something.

Anyone else got anything macerating?

-Erik


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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