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Mulcahy

Making Limoncello

448 posts in this topic

This thread is awesome! I have to wonder, has anyone tried pommelo-cello? I love the scent of pommelos when I break one open - it's a beautifully complex citrus. If I were a drinker, I'd definitely be making some up right now.

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Me again..

I live in italy, and only use Everclear to make my limoncello and other homemade liquore's.

I like that it only takes 3 days to leach out the lemon.. and it is very smooth... I found my vodka one tasted like Vodka...

I am making my Clementino-cello tonight..

I also like when my limoncello is cloudy and not clear.

I think when you make it with the simple syurp being too hot.. it becomes clear and to me looks too commercial!

then of course there is the Crema di limoncello.. which I need to try enxt, which probably is like Bailey's and you would use evaported milk to the recipe!

Buon Natale! Limoncello Eggnog anyone????

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Buon Natale, Judy. My limoncello is always cloudy. And all the while I thought it was a fault. Hooray!

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Well alrighty then! I'm as surprised as anyone by this turn of events and am delighted to be the driving force behind so many new limoncello hangovers from coast to coast. :biggrin:

This is very a very cool thing though and I'm really happy everyone liked the recipe so much. I am duly humbled :blush:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Congrats Katie and your limoncello sounds like a 'must try' concoction!

I have another question for egullet's limoncello expert: I have read a number of recipes for of liqueurs where the whole citrus fruit is macerated in both alcohol and sugar, presumably because the sugar also has extractive powers. Have you

(or has anyone) tried adding the sugar earlier in a limoncello recipe?

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Congrats Katie and your limoncello sounds like a 'must try' concoction! 

I have another question for egullet's limoncello expert:  I have read a number of recipes for of liqueurs where the whole citrus fruit is macerated in both alcohol and sugar, presumably because the sugar also has extractive powers.  Have you

(or has anyone) tried adding the sugar earlier in a limoncello recipe?

tisch:

Not so sure about that. Since with the Limoncello your only trying to get the essential oils from the peels I don't think the sugar would help, in fact I think it would dilute the power of the alcohol to most effectively extract those oils. Certainly sugar works well to extract juices from fruit (i.e. macerating berries in sugar prior to eating them, etc.), but I think leaving the piths attached to the peels if you were to say, cut the citrus into wedges, would lead to a bitter end result. I think the sugar + alcohol mix would work better with "pulpier/juicier" fruits than it would with citrus.

Of course if you try this method, please report back on your findings.

And my thanks for the congrats. :smile:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Would it be possible to cheat and use something like Boyajian's citrus oils for infusing? I think someone in this thread said that using grapefruit peel would yield a bitters-like result but they've got grapefruit oil for sale... Has anyone tried this as a shortcut?

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Would it be possible to cheat and use something like Boyajian's citrus oils for infusing?  I think someone in this thread said that using grapefruit peel would yield a bitters-like result but they've got grapefruit oil for sale...  Has anyone tried this as a shortcut?

You could do this, but it's sort of like using vanilla extract instead of scraping out a real pod to make vanilla ice cream. The end result is always better if you have the patience to do things the "hard" way. In this case I'm also not sure if the oils would mix with the alcohol as effectively as it does when it's infused over time.

Sometimes the journey is as much a part of the end result as the result, Grasshopper. :wink:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I made a sugarless batch a few months back. It's now a great little chaser to full-bodied winter beers. :smile:

It would need sweetness drunk alone, but in this combo, the dryness piggybacks nicely on the mellow beer.

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I bought a dozen Bergamots today at Whole Foods, and my test-batch of Bergamocello is steeping happily on the counter, while I sip a Friday After Five cocktail made from the juice. I'm a happy girl. :D

~A


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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I bought a dozen Bergamots today at Whole Foods, and my test-batch of Bergamocello is steeping happily on the counter, while I sip a Friday After Five cocktail made from the juice. I'm a happy girl. :D

~A

Very nice! A full report of your findings are expected at the end of the experiment, Doctor! :biggrin:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Very nice!  A full report of your findings are expected at the end of the experiment, Doctor!  :biggrin:

Absolutely! 'Tis the least I can do.

~Anita


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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Ahhh.....limoncello on a hot day, one of our favourites along with Limoncello Tiramisu.

I have been discussing kaffir lime leaf uses on another thread and I'm wondering if you could make kaffir limecello?

Think it would work with the leaves or would you need the rind also?

Has anyone ever tried it?

I'm not sure it would really be a "-cello" were it flavored by anything other than the zest of a citrus fruit. Vodka infused with kaffir lime leaf would be simply kaffir lime leaf vodka (or a kaffir lime leaf cordial after you sweetened it). Which is not to say that it wouldn't be tasty! Kaffir lime leaf vodka is very good.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Would using a commercial citrus infused vodka as the second bottle in your recipe be worthwhile? Or is that going to to stomp on some delicate complexity? Always lookin for the overkill route.

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Ahhh.....limoncello on a hot day, one of our favourites along with Limoncello Tiramisu.

I have been discussing kaffir lime leaf uses on another thread and I'm wondering if you could make kaffir limecello?

Think it would work with the leaves or would you need the rind also?

Has anyone ever tried it?

I'm not sure it would really be a "-cello" were it flavored by anything other than the zest of a citrus fruit. Vodka infused with kaffir lime leaf would be simply kaffir lime leaf vodka (or a kaffir lime leaf cordial after you sweetened it). Which is not to say that it wouldn't be tasty! Kaffir lime leaf vodka is very good.

slkinsey, did you make your own KLL Vodka or purchase it?

If you made it, could you give a brief description of the process.

Thanks :biggrin:

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Bah.... if I was back home in s'pore, Kalamansi-cello! That would be interesting :biggrin:

Anyway, wonder if the Kaffir lime leaf (that i see for USD 20.00 a pound) is fresh. They looked kinda spotty at my local viet supermart.

Still haven't added the simple solution to my lemon infused vodka yet. Just wondering about how much to add. Do I add the remaining 375 ml of vodka to it prior to adding the simple syrup or vice versa.

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slkinsey, did you make your own KLL Vodka or purchase it?

If you made it, could you give a brief description of the process.

Thanks :biggrin:

I've only had the commercial kind, but I've made tons of infused alcohols over the years. Couldn't be easier: Get 1.5 liter bottle of good vodka. Pour out several ounces into a jar. Stuff in a whole lot of fresh kaffir lime leaves. Top off with vodka from jar. Test a teaspoon or so every day until vodka reaches desired intensity of flavor. Remove kaffir lime leaves. Voila! Kaffir lime leaf vodka.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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slkinsey, did you make your own KLL Vodka or purchase it?

If you made it, could you give a brief description of the process.

Thanks :biggrin:

I've only had the commercial kind, but I've made tons of infused alcohols over the years. Couldn't be easier: Get 1.5 liter bottle of good vodka. Pour out several ounces into a jar. Stuff in a whole lot of fresh kaffir lime leaves. Top off with vodka from jar. Test a teaspoon or so every day until vodka reaches desired intensity of flavor. Remove kaffir lime leaves. Voila! Kaffir lime leaf vodka.

Thanks for the info slkinsey!

I don't drink martini's anymore but that sure would make a nice one.

I could add in some simple syrup I suppose and make it into a cello (or sweet like limoncello)?

What do you think?

Frances

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I think you're better off, for the sake of versatility, adding the simple syrup to taste as you drink the stuff. That way you could have a sweet kaffir lime leaf cordial by mixing it with some simple syrup, but you could also make a kaffir lime leaf cocktail that wouldn't taste like drinking maple syrup out of the can.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Kaffir Limes / Kaffir lime rind is also available, so you could make kaffir-cello if you want in this way.

I'm a die hard limoncello fan - my gioia luisa from last trip to Italy is gone - glad I looked on the gullet - always a good place to find these interesting tidbits. I'm thinking of starting two batches at once, lemon and blood orange. I'll report - don't worry, I will!

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Reporting back from the front lines of the bergamocello operation:

gallery_11063_720_129334.jpg

The zest infusing in the 100-proof vodka. (I used Absolut, since it was the only brand on offer at our crappy state store.) This is shown at approximately the 2-week mark; I wish I had taken pictures earlier in the process to give you a comparison, but I didn't.

gallery_11063_720_14913.jpg

Here's the infusion with the zest filtered out, the 750ml of 80-proof vodka (again, Absolut), and the 1:1 simple syrup.

gallery_11063_720_181056.jpg

This is the vodka, simple syrup, and infusion, poured into the big bottles before blending. I though it was pretty like this. :cool:

gallery_11063_720_27407.jpg

The mixed bergamocello, in its flasks. (I need to get some more!)

gallery_11063_720_133179.jpg

...and a finished flask with the label. (I couldn't get a clear enough shot of the label, but it says "January 2004 -- Bergamocello -- Bergamot digistivo"

The finished product is really interesting and good. Not too sweet, reminiscent of grapefruit with hints of spice and spicy herbs. It's almost middle-eastern or indian in flavor: cardamom, nigella, coriander. It's definitely similar to, but distinctly different from, the flavors in the bergamot juice. I wish I could upload a glass for you all to try!

I'm pretty happy with the first effort.

~Anita


Anita Crotty travel writer & mexican-food addictwww.marriedwithdinner.com

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Tis the season to zest your limones

Fa lalalala

lalalaLoeb

Grab a handful of yellow cajones

Fa lalalala

lalalaLoeb

Clean we now our deco glassware

Fa lalalalalalalala!

Pick your favy Russian to pair

Falalalala

la

la Limoncello

The winter fades; don't get caught this summer without a decent batch of the cloudy stuff :smile:

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:laugh::laugh::laugh:

This is just about the funniest thing I've ever read. I would never have expected to end up in song. Too funny! This has absolutely made my evening!

More importantly, the Bergamotcello is a success. So how cool is that? Yet another well thought out experiment goes good.

I just love it when that happens! :smile:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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