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Pâte de Fruits (Fruit Paste/Fruit Jellies) (Part 1)


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I've always been able to freeze pate de fruit with no problems.

Really?!? I believe you but I'm surprised...

Do you get any textural changes?

Do you have to re-coat with sugar after thawing?

Thanks in advance.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I made my first batch of pate de fruit using the Boiron recipes last night. It says to let stand for 48 hours, then cut, coat in sugar and let stand 48 more. Is that timing right? And what does it do - is there an associated textural change?

Tammy's Tastings

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eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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I made my first batch of pate de fruit using the Boiron recipes last night. It says to let stand for 48 hours, then cut, coat in sugar and let stand 48 more. Is that timing right? And what does it do - is there an associated textural change?

Just lets the surface dry sufficiently that the jellies don't weep.

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I cast it in half sheets and freeze it w/o the sugar.

Sugar it when it's thawed.

I've never really noticed any textural differences. I was suprised when i was told it could be frozen, because it didn't seem right to me either, but john kraus from french pastry gave me the info, and I trust that guy. he was right.

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I did a rhubard PDF. The texture was rubbery and not as soft as I would like. I definately need to get a refractometer. I used a food prep machine to finely chop the rhubarb and I think next time I am going to use my champion juicer and then strain because I think the water content was low, and there was to much fibre.

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I made my first batch of pate de fruit using the Boiron recipes last night. It says to let stand for 48 hours, then cut, coat in sugar and let stand 48 more. Is that timing right? And what does it do - is there an associated textural change?

Just lets the surface dry sufficiently that the jellies don't weep.

So Kerry, what would you do if the jellies started to weep? Could you rinse them, dry and then re-coat with sugar?

Also, do you coat with sugar immediately after pouring the PdF into the frame, or do you wait until they're unmolded to sugar them?

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I made my first batch of pate de fruit using the Boiron recipes last night. It says to let stand for 48 hours, then cut, coat in sugar and let stand 48 more. Is that timing right? And what does it do - is there an associated textural change?

Just lets the surface dry sufficiently that the jellies don't weep.

So Kerry, what would you do if the jellies started to weep? Could you rinse them, dry and then re-coat with sugar?

Also, do you coat with sugar immediately after pouring the PdF into the frame, or do you wait until they're unmolded to sugar them?

When I've had weepy ones, I just leave them open to the air until they dry more, then redip in sugar. Never bothered to rinse them.

I unmold, sugar both sides, cut on the guitar, then sugar the remaining sides.

Depending on the PDF and how dry it is right off the bat, sometimes I don't bother to let it sit more than over night. That's fooled me a few times and I've had weeping.

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I'm planning to make some peach pate de fruit. I've done a little experimentation but want to make a big batch this weekend, so I'm hoping for a little feedback to help me get them right!

For my experiments, I used the g-pectin, because that's what I had on hand, but I'm planning on picking up some regular pectin. I saw upthread that I should be able to find what I need with the canning supplies - is there a particular brand I should be looking for?

I found that the texture of my test batch was much softer than I wanted (although I had no problem with weeping). I want there to be a bit of toothsome-ness too it. What's the ideal PdF texture? I'm guessing that using regular pectin will help, as I seem to recall that the g pectin is designed to produce a particularly soft PdF.

Kerry - you mention that a 1/2 batch of the Boiron fits in 10x10 caramel bars. What height of bar/finished product does that produce?

Lastly, I'm making a peach PdF and it's really quite sweet. I think upthread there was a suggestion to add some citric acid to punch up the acidity a little - when would I add that, and what's a good amount to start with for a half batch?

Thanks!

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Lastly, I'm making a peach PdF and it's really quite sweet. I think upthread there was a suggestion to add some citric acid to punch up the acidity a little - when would I add that, and what's a good amount to start with for a half batch?

Tammy the info on the Boiron web site gives 15g of citric acid to 1 litre of fruit puree for peach pate de friut and you add the citric acid right at the end. I have not made this so no experience but they have a good pdf file you can download of proportions for lots of different fruits. www.boironfreres.com

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Lastly, I'm making a peach PdF and it's really quite sweet. I think upthread there was a suggestion to add some citric acid to punch up the acidity a little - when would I add that, and what's a good amount to start with for a half batch?

Tammy the info on the Boiron web site gives 15g of citric acid to 1 litre of fruit puree for peach pate de friut and you add the citric acid right at the end. I have not made this so no experience but they have a good pdf file you can download of proportions for lots of different fruits. www.boironfreres.com

But they add that right at the end for all the recipes - I think it's part of the chemistry of the formula. I'd like to add extra for flavor purposes.

Tammy's Tastings

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eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Tammy,

The acid is added for the following reasons:

  • to coagulate the pectin
  • improve shelf-life
  • prevent the formation of sugar crystals

If you are going to add any extra acid, it must be at the end; otherwise, it may begin to setup before you're ready.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
For my experiments, I used the g-pectin, because that's what I had on hand, but I'm planning on picking up some regular pectin. I saw upthread that I should be able to find what I need with the canning supplies - is there a particular brand I should be looking for?

I found that the texture of my test batch was much softer than I wanted (although I had no problem with weeping). I want there to be a bit of toothsome-ness too it. What's the ideal PdF texture? I'm guessing that using regular pectin will help, as I seem to recall that the g pectin is designed to produce a particularly soft PdF.

Tammy,

Andrew's g-pectin isn't really designed to do the sort of pdf you're aiming for. It's a special blend he created to make pdf to be paired with chocolate and then enrobed. Hence its softness.

You want to look for "apple pectin." Most of the pectin in the canning section at the markets won't work well for pdf. And stay away from citrus pectin. Try this link to L'Epicerie for small quantities of the right stuff: http://www.lepicerie.com/customer/product....02&cat=0&page=1

They also have glucose and citric acid (we tend to use fresh lemon juice instead). You can probably substitute corn syrup for the glucose if you want.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Cheers,

Steve

Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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For my experiments, I used the g-pectin, because that's what I had on hand, but I'm planning on picking up some regular pectin. I saw upthread that I should be able to find what I need with the canning supplies - is there a particular brand I should be looking for?

I found that the texture of my test batch was much softer than I wanted (although I had no problem with weeping). I want there to be a bit of toothsome-ness too it. What's the ideal PdF texture? I'm guessing that using regular pectin will help, as I seem to recall that the g pectin is designed to produce a particularly soft PdF.

Tammy,

Andrew's g-pectin isn't really designed to do the sort of pdf you're aiming for. It's a special blend he created to make pdf to be paired with chocolate and then enrobed. Hence its softness.

You want to look for "apple pectin." Most of the pectin in the canning section at the markets won't work well for pdf. And stay away from citrus pectin. Try this link to L'Epicerie for small quantities of the right stuff: http://www.lepicerie.com/customer/product....02&cat=0&page=1

They also have glucose and citric acid (we tend to use fresh lemon juice instead). You can probably substitute corn syrup for the glucose if you want.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Cheers,

Steve

I figured the g-pectin wasn't quite right, but it's what I had, so I thought it was worth trying.

Unfortunately, I don't have time to order anything special. Kerry says upthread that canning section pectin should work, although I've been assuming that I should avoid the "no added sugar needed" varieties and look for the real thing. Unfortunately, today all I could find was liquid pectin and the no sugar kind - I'll go to another store tomorrow and see if I have better luck.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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For my experiments, I used the g-pectin, because that's what I had on hand, but I'm planning on picking up some regular pectin. I saw upthread that I should be able to find what I need with the canning supplies - is there a particular brand I should be looking for?

I found that the texture of my test batch was much softer than I wanted (although I had no problem with weeping). I want there to be a bit of toothsome-ness too it. What's the ideal PdF texture? I'm guessing that using regular pectin will help, as I seem to recall that the g pectin is designed to produce a particularly soft PdF.

Tammy,

Andrew's g-pectin isn't really designed to do the sort of pdf you're aiming for. It's a special blend he created to make pdf to be paired with chocolate and then enrobed. Hence its softness.

You want to look for "apple pectin." Most of the pectin in the canning section at the markets won't work well for pdf. And stay away from citrus pectin. Try this link to L'Epicerie for small quantities of the right stuff: http://www.lepicerie.com/customer/product....02&cat=0&page=1

They also have glucose and citric acid (we tend to use fresh lemon juice instead). You can probably substitute corn syrup for the glucose if you want.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Cheers,

Steve

I figured the g-pectin wasn't quite right, but it's what I had, so I thought it was worth trying.

Unfortunately, I don't have time to order anything special. Kerry says upthread that canning section pectin should work, although I've been assuming that I should avoid the "no added sugar needed" varieties and look for the real thing. Unfortunately, today all I could find was liquid pectin and the no sugar kind - I'll go to another store tomorrow and see if I have better luck.

If you can wait until Friday I'll bring you some apple pectin.

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Tammy,

The acid is added for the following reasons:

  • to coagulate the pectin
  • improve shelf-life
  • prevent the formation of sugar crystals

If you are going to add any extra acid, it must be at the end; otherwise, it may begin to setup before you're ready.

Thanks, John. That helps.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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For my experiments, I used the g-pectin, because that's what I had on hand, but I'm planning on picking up some regular pectin. I saw upthread that I should be able to find what I need with the canning supplies - is there a particular brand I should be looking for?

I found that the texture of my test batch was much softer than I wanted (although I had no problem with weeping). I want there to be a bit of toothsome-ness too it. What's the ideal PdF texture? I'm guessing that using regular pectin will help, as I seem to recall that the g pectin is designed to produce a particularly soft PdF.

Tammy,

Andrew's g-pectin isn't really designed to do the sort of pdf you're aiming for. It's a special blend he created to make pdf to be paired with chocolate and then enrobed. Hence its softness.

You want to look for "apple pectin." Most of the pectin in the canning section at the markets won't work well for pdf. And stay away from citrus pectin. Try this link to L'Epicerie for small quantities of the right stuff: http://www.lepicerie.com/customer/product....02&cat=0&page=1

They also have glucose and citric acid (we tend to use fresh lemon juice instead). You can probably substitute corn syrup for the glucose if you want.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Cheers,

Steve

I figured the g-pectin wasn't quite right, but it's what I had, so I thought it was worth trying.

Unfortunately, I don't have time to order anything special. Kerry says upthread that canning section pectin should work, although I've been assuming that I should avoid the "no added sugar needed" varieties and look for the real thing. Unfortunately, today all I could find was liquid pectin and the no sugar kind - I'll go to another store tomorrow and see if I have better luck.

If you can wait until Friday I'll bring you some apple pectin.

Unfortunately, I need them for a fundraising dinner I'm providing chocolates for on Sunday night of the eGullet weekend, so I really need to get them done before I leave Thursday morning.

When I googled apple pectin, I got a lot of links for it as a nutritional supplement. I wonder if I'll be able to find some in the supplements section of my local natural food store, and if so, if it will be in the right format for it to work in PdF? Any guesses?

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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For my experiments, I used the g-pectin, because that's what I had on hand, but I'm planning on picking up some regular pectin. I saw upthread that I should be able to find what I need with the canning supplies - is there a particular brand I should be looking for?

I found that the texture of my test batch was much softer than I wanted (although I had no problem with weeping). I want there to be a bit of toothsome-ness too it. What's the ideal PdF texture? I'm guessing that using regular pectin will help, as I seem to recall that the g pectin is designed to produce a particularly soft PdF.

Tammy,

Andrew's g-pectin isn't really designed to do the sort of pdf you're aiming for. It's a special blend he created to make pdf to be paired with chocolate and then enrobed. Hence its softness.

You want to look for "apple pectin." Most of the pectin in the canning section at the markets won't work well for pdf. And stay away from citrus pectin. Try this link to L'Epicerie for small quantities of the right stuff: http://www.lepicerie.com/customer/product....02&cat=0&page=1

They also have glucose and citric acid (we tend to use fresh lemon juice instead). You can probably substitute corn syrup for the glucose if you want.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Cheers,

Steve

I figured the g-pectin wasn't quite right, but it's what I had, so I thought it was worth trying.

Unfortunately, I don't have time to order anything special. Kerry says upthread that canning section pectin should work, although I've been assuming that I should avoid the "no added sugar needed" varieties and look for the real thing. Unfortunately, today all I could find was liquid pectin and the no sugar kind - I'll go to another store tomorrow and see if I have better luck.

If you can wait until Friday I'll bring you some apple pectin.

Unfortunately, I need them for a fundraising dinner I'm providing chocolates for on Sunday night of the eGullet weekend, so I really need to get them done before I leave Thursday morning.

When I googled apple pectin, I got a lot of links for it as a nutritional supplement. I wonder if I'll be able to find some in the supplements section of my local natural food store, and if so, if it will be in the right format for it to work in PdF? Any guesses?

I think it was Mark Rose that used that form for PDF, so it should work. I'd forgotten about that.

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Unfortunately, I need them for a fundraising dinner I'm providing chocolates for on Sunday night of the eGullet weekend, so I really need to get them done before I leave Thursday morning.

When I googled apple pectin, I got a lot of links for it as a nutritional supplement. I wonder if I'll be able to find some in the supplements section of my local natural food store, and if so, if it will be in the right format for it to work in PdF? Any guesses?

I think it was Mark Rose that used that form for PDF, so it should work. I'd forgotten about that.

Okay, i'll look for that. So does this mean that regular grocery store pectin *won't* work?

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Unfortunately, I need them for a fundraising dinner I'm providing chocolates for on Sunday night of the eGullet weekend, so I really need to get them done before I leave Thursday morning.

When I googled apple pectin, I got a lot of links for it as a nutritional supplement. I wonder if I'll be able to find some in the supplements section of my local natural food store, and if so, if it will be in the right format for it to work in PdF? Any guesses?

I think it was Mark Rose that used that form for PDF, so it should work. I'd forgotten about that.

Okay, i'll look for that. So does this mean that regular grocery store pectin *won't* work?

Yup, the grocery store stuff won't work. See post #44. A couple of posts later it seems that I am agreeing with grocery store pectin - but I'm just agreeing that it was grocery store pectin, not that it was useful.

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Unfortunately, I need them for a fundraising dinner I'm providing chocolates for on Sunday night of the eGullet weekend, so I really need to get them done before I leave Thursday morning.

When I googled apple pectin, I got a lot of links for it as a nutritional supplement. I wonder if I'll be able to find some in the supplements section of my local natural food store, and if so, if it will be in the right format for it to work in PdF? Any guesses?

I think it was Mark Rose that used that form for PDF, so it should work. I'd forgotten about that.

Okay, i'll look for that. So does this mean that regular grocery store pectin *won't* work?

Yup, the grocery store stuff won't work. See post #44. A couple of posts later it seems that I am agreeing with grocery store pectin - but I'm just agreeing that it was grocery store pectin, not that it was useful.

Ah, I see. Bummer. That series of posts is very confusing.

I guess I'll just cross my fingers that one of the natural food stores will come through for me with some apple pectin, then. Otherwise, I guess I'll just puree up these super ripe peaches sitting on my counter and freeze them for later...

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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  • 2 months later...

So, I just bought the entire set up for making pate de fruits...

0-80% refractometer

thermopen

tartaric acid

boiron fruit purees

apple pectin (from l'epicerie)

500g / .01g scale

So, i have been following the boiron recipes from their website and have been failing. I have been making half batches if that makes a difference. I tried out the cherry and the strawberry recipes. The cherry recipe I tried as is, and the strawberry I tried with 14g of pectin instead of 12.5g. Both of them came out too soft. The strawberry came out better. I can put a knife through it, and it slighly holds its shape, but it is still gooey and not cuttable.

I tried recooking them with a little water and added pectin back to 75%, but that did not make much of a difference.

Instead of wasting more money on purees, I figured I would ask you guys. Has anyone had a lot of success from the boiron puree recipe as written? Does anyone have the apple pectin from l'epicerie and made pate de fruit from them?

I am going to try the cherry one again tonight with 17g of pectin instead of the 10g stated. My other question is that if I up the pectin do I have to worry about the amount of tartaric acid? Do I have to up that too?

I would appreciate any advice!

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I haven't had any problems with the recipes - I've used two different brands of apple pectin. I take it to 107º C then check to be sure I'm around 75 Brix. I almost always make part batches.

I don't increase the tartaric based on the amount of pectin.

Are you convinced of the reliability of your thermometer and refractometer?

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I haven't had any problems with the recipes - I've used two different brands of apple pectin.  I take it to 107º C then check to be sure I'm around 75 Brix.  I almost always make part batches.

I don't increase the tartaric based on the amount of pectin.

Are you convinced of the reliability of your thermometer and refractometer?

I just checked my refractometer, and you are so right! I should have checked it before. The cherry puree should be at 26% and it was at 30%. The strawberry puree should be at 18% and it was at 8%. Obviously an issue! I only cooked them using my refractometer...not my thermometer. Bad ebay purchase I guess...

Thanks!

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I haven't had any problems with the recipes - I've used two different brands of apple pectin.  I take it to 107º C then check to be sure I'm around 75 Brix.  I almost always make part batches.

I don't increase the tartaric based on the amount of pectin.

Are you convinced of the reliability of your thermometer and refractometer?

I just checked my refractometer, and you are so right! I should have checked it before. The cherry puree should be at 26% and it was at 30%. The strawberry puree should be at 18% and it was at 8%. Obviously an issue! I only cooked them using my refractometer...not my thermometer. Bad ebay purchase I guess...

Thanks!

Is there an adjustment on your refractometer? If not, I find just cooking to the high end of 107ºC seems to work even if I don't have my refractometer with me.

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