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Pâte de Fruits (Fruit Paste/Fruit Jellies) (Part 1)


elizabethnathan
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Another consideration is my higher altitude (Eugene, OR). I'm unsure of the exact calculations for altitude temperature conversions.

The "official" altitude of Eugene is 130 meters asl. The boiling point of water at 130 meters is 210.6F/99.27C. You'd have to be about 1km asl before the boiling point would be 205. Did your fruit mixture ever boil?

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"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Hmm... sounds like a thermometer issue. What kind of thermometer are you using?

I'm using a laser thermometer from Thermoworks. Fairly reliable piece of equipment. The battery power was low though. That might have been my problem.

In response to the other post:

The mixture did boil. I will replace the batteries and try again tonight.

Shane

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Hmm... sounds like a thermometer issue. What kind of thermometer are you using?

I'm using a laser thermometer from Thermoworks. Fairly reliable piece of equipment. The battery power was low though. That might have been my problem.

In response to the other post:

The mixture did boil. I will replace the batteries and try again tonight.

Shane

Laser as in infrared? There is another thread out HERE that discusses the use of infrared thermometers and use in sugar work. In addition to your batteries, that may be part of the problem.

Cheryl, The Sweet Side
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Hmm... sounds like a thermometer issue. What kind of thermometer are you using?

I'm using a laser thermometer from Thermoworks. Fairly reliable piece of equipment. The battery power was low though. That might have been my problem.

Shane

Ouch! I think these aren't recommended for sugar work (ironically) because of the difference in surface temp/internal temp. I think someone recommended the Taylor Classic Candy Thermometer in another thread.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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I'm working with a pate de fruit recipe from the Jean Pierre Wybauw book and it states in the instructions to cook to 225 F.  I cooked and cooked but never got above 205 F.  Although, in other recipes I have read, it says to cook till "stringy" or "pearls on a whisk" which I definately went past.  I also kept stirring the puree (is this right?) for fear of scorching and I am afraid that I did not achieve that  Pate de fruit consistency I so love.  The jelly set fine, despite the lower cooking temperature and the fact I forgot to add the citric acid solution at the end.  I'm assuming the mango puree contained enough acid to set the pectin.  I'm using a pate de fruit pectin I purchased form chef rubber and I used 25 g for 1 k of puree and 1100 g of sugar with 200 g of corn syrup. 

Shane, your recipe seems right. At what point in the process does Wybauw tell you add the pectin? Some recipes add it near the start, some near the finish.

The most consistent formulas I've found come from the Boirons Purees website. They add the pectin early on.

We now use a refractometer to measure Brix, but used to just measure the temps cited in the brochure.

We used (and still use for the first few minutes of cooking the fruit) a $20-30 two-piece digital probe thermometer. We got a cheap "bulldog" clamp at Staples which lets us leave the probe in the mixture, even while stirring. We can constantly monitor the temp this way.

Some fruits seem to resist going higher than 205-210F without burning. But as long as the stuff seems like it's beginning to gel then it'll probably turn out all right.

And don't stop stirring for more than a few seconds at a time.

Good luck!

Cheers,

Steve

Edited by stscam (log)
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Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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I'm working with a pate de fruit recipe from the Jean Pierre Wybauw book and it states in the instructions to cook to 225 F.  I cooked and cooked but never got above 205 F.  Although, in other recipes I have read, it says to cook till "stringy" or "pearls on a whisk" which I definately went past.   I also kept stirring the puree (is this right?) for fear of scorching and I am afraid that I did not achieve that  Pate de fruit consistency I so love.  The jelly set fine, despite the lower cooking temperature and the fact I forgot to add the citric acid solution at the end.  I'm assuming the mango puree contained enough acid to set the pectin.  I'm using a pate de fruit pectin I purchased form chef rubber and I used 25 g for 1 k of puree and 1100 g of sugar with 200 g of corn syrup. 

Shane, your recipe seems right. At what point in the process does Wybauw tell you add the pectin? Some recipes add it near the start, some near the finish.

The most consistent formulas I've found come from the Boirons Purees website. They add the pectin early on.

We now use a refractometer to measure Brix, but used to just measure the temps cited in the brochure.

We used (and still use for the first few minutes of cooking the fruit) a $20-30 two-piece digital probe thermometer. We got a cheap "bulldog" clamp at Staples which lets us leave the probe in the mixture, even while stirring. We can constantly monitor the temp this way.

Some fruits seem to resist going higher than 205-210F without burning. But as long as the stuff seems like it's beginning to gel then it'll probably turn out all right.

And don't stop stirring for more than a few seconds at a time.

Good luck!

Cheers,

Steve

Thanks Steve. The recipe dictates adding the pectin to a quantity of 500g puree. And adding that portion to the rest of the puree and sugar. Is there a scientific reasoning behind this? And what woud the outcome be adding the pectin at the end? Also, when adding citric acid solution, I assume it is added at the end.....What would be the chemical changes if it were added in the beginning versus the end?

You say some fruits resist cooking higher than 205-210? Which fruits in your experience? What is the reasoning behind this phenomenon?

Thanks,

Shane

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Brother Shane,

Good to see you contributing to egullet. Your skill, knowledge, drive, and expertise will fit in well. Now if you'd just harness that energy towards.................well, bread for example.

Best regards,

Mitch

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The recipe dictates adding the pectin to a quantity of 500g puree. And adding that portion to the rest of the puree and sugar. Is there a scientific reasoning behind this? And what woud the outcome be adding the pectin at the end? Also, when adding citric acid solution, I assume it is added at the end.....What would be the chemical changes if it were added in the beginning versus the end?

You say some fruits resist cooking higher than 205-210? Which fruits in your experience? What is the reasoning behind this phenomenon?

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Just to add another 2 cents, when I make it, I warm the puree, then add the pectin (mixed with about a quarter of the sugar) - when that boils, I add the sugar and glucose. I cook up to about 215, then start testing on a plate that's been in the freezer. I put a drop on the plate, stick it back in the freezer for a minute, then touch it - when it's firm and no longer (or very barely) sticky to the touch, it's done. Also, you have to stir constantly or risk scorching. I add the citric acid once it's off the heat. Different fruits are done at different temps, so the plate trick really works.

"Never eat more than you can lift." --Miss Piggy
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When makng this with just juice- no fruit puree (have blood orange juice on hand), do the amounts of sugar/pectin change significantly?

looking to make up a small batch at home...

The batch I made came out just fine with no changes in the recipe. I think the recipe I gave you would have a sufficient amount of pectin from the apricots to gel.

In general I believe a standard recipe without apricots or apples would be equal portions of fruit pulp (or juice) to sugar. As for pectin I'm not sure what a standard percentage would be.

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When makng this with just juice- no fruit puree (have blood orange juice on hand), do the amounts of sugar/pectin change significantly?

looking to make up a small batch at home...

You might want to watch the amount of sugar in the juice and add less if it is too sweet. Most of the juices I've tried have been sweeter than purees. Other than that everything should work fine.

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  • 8 months later...

could someone pleast put a recipe up for a home cook to make these? I have had some incredible ones and hae been dying to make them and experiment with flavors. Also, where can I find the apple pectin? Every google search brings up health food stores that have them in capsules.

Thanks

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  • 3 months later...

Hello all,

For all of you who have experience making (and eating) pate de fruit, and know the difference between excellent quality and sub-par products, I am wondering if you can steer me toward a few companies in the US that make some of the best pate de fruit and ship it nationwide?

I truly understand that one must pay for the highest quality items, and I am willing to do so, but no "Nokas" of the pate de fruit world please.

Thank you in advance for your help!

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Well, since no one has responded so far, let me add that I am not set on US-made pate de fruit, but I just figured that it would be easier to get ahold of and a bit less expensive. However, if there are French brands being imported into the US that are excellent, then I would be interested in knowing about them too.

Best,

Alan

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Alan,

I'm a loss what to tell you. I don't buy the stuff, rather I make it. I know that in France even the cheap stuff you buy in the supermarket is wonderful.

Now if you want to try making it, just let us know and we'll link you to everything you need.

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