Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Pâte de Fruits (Fruit Paste/Fruit Jellies) (Part 1)


Recommended Posts

i had the same probs with pate de fruit until we once had a french patissier who gave me a standard recipe that works for each and every fruitpuree, no matter what.

Pate de Fruit

1000 puree and

500 water bring to 50C

50 pectin

150 sugar mix with pectin add to puree mixture

1800 sugar

500 glucose add when puree mixture boils, boil to 108 C !!

after cooking add

30 citric acid (or more to balance sweet/sour)

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Link to post
Share on other sites

I take my PDF to 106-107. I also keep a plate in the fridge and take it out while cooking the PDF. When I take the PDF off the heat (just before adding tartaric acid), a put a small blog on the cold plate and check it sets up and doesn't spread. Then add the tartaric acid if its OK, otherwise return to the heat for a while.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

About a week ago or so, I was making a big batch of Passionfruit Pate de fruit. When I was just about 15 minutes or so from reaching my target temperature, the power for the entire area went out. I was 4 or 5 degrees Celsius below where I needed to be.

After about 45 minutes, it had cooled sufficiently that I didn't think this batch would be recoverable. So instead of dirtying up my molds, I poured it into a small sponge cake pan. It did set, but of course it's too soft.

Finally, my question: what can I do with all of this extra passionfruit pate de fruit?

I thought about making some mango sorbet and adding some a) pate de fruit cubes at the end or b) sticking some the the pate de fruit in a blender with the mango puree and adding sugar syrup shooting for a target BRIX of, say, 29?

What do you think?

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
About a week ago or so, I was making a big batch of Passionfruit Pate de fruit.  When I was just about 15 minutes or so from reaching my target temperature, the power for the entire area went out.  I was 4 or 5 degrees Celsius below where I needed to be.

After about 45 minutes, it had cooled sufficiently that I didn't think this batch would be recoverable.  So instead of dirtying up my molds, I poured it into a small sponge cake pan.  It did set, but of course it's too soft.

Finally, my question:  what can I do with all of this extra passionfruit pate de fruit?

I thought about making some mango sorbet and adding some a) pate de fruit cubes at the end or b) sticking some the the pate de fruit in a blender with the mango puree and adding sugar syrup shooting for a target BRIX of, say, 29?

What do you think?

I'm assuming that you don't want to incorporate it into a bon bon, so how about making it into a layered dessert with a sponge and maybe a mousse layer, finished with pate a glace. Like something dejaq would make.

Link to post
Share on other sites
About a week ago or so, I was making a big batch of Passionfruit Pate de fruit.  When I was just about 15 minutes or so from reaching my target temperature, the power for the entire area went out.  I was 4 or 5 degrees Celsius below where I needed to be.

After about 45 minutes, it had cooled sufficiently that I didn't think this batch would be recoverable.  So instead of dirtying up my molds, I poured it into a small sponge cake pan.  It did set, but of course it's too soft.

Finally, my question:  what can I do with all of this extra passionfruit pate de fruit?

I thought about making some mango sorbet and adding some a) pate de fruit cubes at the end or b) sticking some the the pate de fruit in a blender with the mango puree and adding sugar syrup shooting for a target BRIX of, say, 29?

What do you think?

I'm assuming that you don't want to incorporate it into a bon bon, so how about making it into a layered dessert with a sponge and maybe a mousse layer, finished with pate a glace. Like something dejaq would make.

Sounds delicious!

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the texture like? I'm not sure where we're at with "too soft". Are we talking a soft but still chewy "gummy" texture or a strong jelly texture? I'm assuming not a soft jelly or gelee texture since you mentioned mixing cubes into sorbet. I like Kerry's idea as long as it's not too chewy or too sticky to cut cleanly.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites
What's the texture like? I'm not sure where we're at with "too soft". Are we talking a soft but still chewy "gummy" texture or a strong jelly texture? I'm assuming not a soft jelly or gelee texture since you mentioned mixing cubes into sorbet. I like Kerry's idea as long as it's not too chewy or too sticky to cut cleanly.

More like a strong jelly texture - strong enough to hold its shape, but only just.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
you could puree it with some heavy cream and then fold it into some whipped cream for a mousse component in a dessert.  the pectin will help stabilize the whipped cream a bit so you won't need to use gelatin?!

Interesting suggestion! Love the idea of not having to use gelatin. Worth a try.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
you could puree it with some heavy cream and then fold it into some whipped cream for a mousse component in a dessert.  the pectin will help stabilize the whipped cream a bit so you won't need to use gelatin?!

Interesting suggestion! Love the idea of not having to use gelatin. Worth a try.

i'm not totally sure it would work, but it IS worth a try :wink:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Is granulated sugar always used or a more "defined" sugar like a sanding sugar?

info always greatly appreciated!

:-)

A much better result can be achieved with sanding sugar. The larger grains don't melt as much as granulated sugar does.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
Is granulated sugar always used or a more "defined" sugar like a sanding sugar?

info always greatly appreciated!

:-)

A much better result can be achieved with sanding sugar. The larger grains don't melt as much as granulated sugar does.

And it looks much prettier - reflects the light better - sparkles in a way that granulated sugar can't.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Is granulated sugar always used or a more "defined" sugar like a sanding sugar?

info always greatly appreciated!

:-)

A much better result can be achieved with sanding sugar. The larger grains don't melt as much as granulated sugar does.

And it looks much prettier - reflects the light better - sparkles in a way that granulated sugar can't.

I guess I didn't say it very well but that's exactly what I meant. Thanks, Kerry! :smile:

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks to both of you for the info.

I thought the flakes looked a bit too big for rgular old sugar.

Next, does anyone use a refractometer to measure Brix in their 'fruit mix?

I want a refractometer that does Baume & Brix measurement.

Possible?

Thanks in advance!

ted

2317/5000

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks to both of you for the info.

I thought the flakes looked a bit too big for rgular old sugar.

Next, does anyone use a refractometer to measure Brix in their 'fruit mix?

I want a refractometer that does Baume & Brix measurement.

Possible?

Thanks in advance!

ted

I use a refractometer but am confident enough to go by temperature alone if necessary.

I don't know of a refractometer that provides both Baume and Brix; however, the calculation is fairly easy: Brix / 1.85 ~= Baume.

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks to both of you for the info.

I thought the flakes looked a bit too big for rgular old sugar.

Next, does anyone use a refractometer to measure Brix in their 'fruit mix?

I want a refractometer that does Baume & Brix measurement.

Possible?

Thanks in advance!

ted

I think hydrometers measure baume and refractometers measure brix - but like John said you can get a pretty quick indication with the conversion rule (otherwise there are more precide conversion tables in a lot of chocolate/confectionary books)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Well, I seem to be having issues with my pates de fruits. Every now and then, I get a batch that “weeps.” Not sure why this happens sometimes and not others. This occurs about 6 weeks after packaging.

The recipe I’m using is the Boiron Frères (BF) for Passion fruit. I cook to 107C and verify that it’s 75BRIX before pouring into silicone molds. I then immediately sprinkle with granulated sugar “to prevent a skin from forming.”

What I usually do is leave it in the silicone molds 1 – 2 days, covered with wax paper. (Maybe that’s a problem and I should leave them open to air?) When I remove the wax paper, it clearly shows signs of dampness from the PdF, and the sugar is a little “clumpy.” I brush them off, unmold and roll in sugar and place in paper candy cups. I then try to let them sit a day or so before placing in acetate candy boxes. The boxes are pretty close to "air tight."

The BF instructions say that you need to:

Leave the fruit jelly to rest outside the frame for 48 hours on both sides. Cut it, coat in granulated sugar and leave to rest again for 48 hours.

This, of course, refers to the usual slabbed method of making PdF. I interpret their instructions to mean: remove the frame and allow to sit open to the air for 48 hours, flip them, dust with sugar, and allow to sit another 48 hours. Then cut, roll in sugar, and package.

Pierre Hermé says that they should be cut, enrobed in sugar, and set out in the open for 72 hours so that they’ll dry out. Only then is it safe to package them.

The French Professional Pastry series recommends drying the PdF for 24 – 48 hours in a warm area 40C (104F) before packaging.

Portland is a rather humid place. So I guess I’m wondering what I can do to ensure no more weeping (for both my PdF and me)! I have a small dehydrator; should I use it after the PdF is in the candy cups?

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've let mine sit for a couple of days before rolling them in sugar to help prevent weeping. As long as they are sitting on silicone I don't have sticking problems.

But it would be interesting to see whether a dehydrator would allow you to roll in sugar immediately.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've let mine sit for a couple of days before rolling them in sugar to help prevent weeping.  As long as they are sitting on silicone I don't have sticking problems.

But it would be interesting to see whether a dehydrator would allow you to roll in sugar immediately.

So you don't cover in sugar just after dumping the hot PdF into the frame? Somewhere, I was sure that I read to dust with sugar immediately. But now, checking my 3 sources, I don't see that. Maybe that's my problem...

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
I've let mine sit for a couple of days before rolling them in sugar to help prevent weeping.  As long as they are sitting on silicone I don't have sticking problems.

But it would be interesting to see whether a dehydrator would allow you to roll in sugar immediately.

So you don't cover in sugar just after dumping the hot PdF into the frame? Somewhere, I was sure that I read to dust with sugar immediately. But now, checking my 3 sources, I don't see that. Maybe that's my problem...

Nope, always wait til they seem dry enough. Anytime I've had to rush them, I get seepage.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I seem to be having issues with my pates de fruits.  Every now and then, I get a batch that “weeps.”  Not sure why this happens sometimes and not others.  This occurs about 6 weeks after packaging.

The recipe I’m using is the Boiron Frères (BF) for Passion fruit.  I cook to 107C and verify that it’s 75BRIX before pouring into silicone molds.  I then immediately sprinkle with granulated sugar “to prevent a skin from forming.”

What I usually do is leave it in the silicone molds 1 – 2 days, covered with wax paper.  (Maybe that’s a problem and I should leave them open to air?)  When I remove the wax paper, it clearly shows signs of dampness from the PdF, and the sugar is a little “clumpy.”  I brush them off, unmold and roll in sugar and place in paper candy cups.  I then try to let them sit a day or so before placing in acetate candy boxes.  The boxes are pretty close to "air tight."

The BF instructions say that you need to:

Leave the fruit jelly to rest outside the frame for 48 hours on both sides. Cut it, coat in granulated sugar and leave to rest again for 48 hours.

This, of course, refers to the usual slabbed method of making PdF. I interpret their instructions to mean: remove the frame and allow to sit open to the air for 48 hours, flip them, dust with sugar, and allow to sit another 48 hours. Then cut, roll in sugar, and package.

Pierre Hermé says that they should be cut, enrobed in sugar, and set out in the open for 72 hours so that they’ll dry out. Only then is it safe to package them.

The French Professional Pastry series recommends drying the PdF for 24 – 48 hours in a warm area 40C (104F) before packaging.

Portland is a rather humid place. So I guess I’m wondering what I can do to ensure no more weeping (for both my PdF and me)! I have a small dehydrator; should I use it after the PdF is in the candy cups?

I don't know if this would help but Paco Torreblanca uses pectin NH in his pate de fruit.

Maybe try a batch and see what happens ?

Also didn't think you dusted with sugar until after drying/resting..

2317/5000

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to try to find out where I read to coat immediately but it seems that that's not right.

Thanks, again!

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Similar Content

    • By CharTruff
      Hello! 
       
      I am doing some spring cleaning and am selling some of my used polycarbonate molds. I've attached pictures and dimensions below.  The mold prices do not include shipping fee. I will ship these via USPS priority mail. 
       
      For estimation purposes only, 4 - 5 molds can fit in a medium box and it costs $15.05 to ship. Please let me know if you have any questions.  
       
      Thank you. 
      Charlotte W. 





    • By eglies
      Hello everyone!
       
      I hope you are all safe and well  
       
      I have a question regarding Chef Rubber Natural Colours. Its very difficult to get them here in Europe (if anyone has any contacts or knows a company that sells that would be great) and anyone that has used this line, what colours would you recommend? 
       
      Thank you!
       
    • By eglies
      Hello everyone! 
       
      Im in need of your expertise! Ive been having troubles with my machine, or maybe not even my machine. 
      Ive attached an image (hopefully its clear) to show you a mould that has different tempering problems. I dont understand how one mould can have several different tempering issues. 
      Ive also been advised to have my machine between 30C-31C, however all ive known is to use dark chocolate between 31-32C. Ive done tests from 30C-32C and none have the outcome that is expected, that shiny chocolate. 
      Please share your knowledge  I really need it!! 
       
      Thank you!!! 
       

    • By Trufflenaut
      I need some advice on a safe(ish), easy, and fast way to cut buttermints   I often make buttermints for friends for the holidays, and have run into problems cutting them into bite size pieces before the sugar cools and starts to crystallize too much, so I'm looking for ideas on how to do it more quickly so I can do larger batches.  Note that I am doing this at home and have very little budget, but on the plus side I don't need to end up with perfectly uniform pieces.
       
      The basic process for making the buttermints is:
      1. cook butter and sugar to 260 degrees
      2. pour out onto buttered marble slab and let cool slightly
      3. add color and flavor, and pull like taffy while it cools further
      4. when it just starts to show signs of crystallizing, roll into ropes and cut before it crystallizes much further (I have maybe 2 minutes if I'm lucky to get all the cutting done)
       
      The main problem I run into is that when handling the candy during steps 3 and 4, my hands need to be buttered so the candy doesn't stick to me, and even if I quickly wash my hands, any cutting tool needs to also be buttered to prevent sticking, and basically it's nearly impossible to maintain a good grip on anything.  The second problem is that the candy at this point is hard enough that if I try to snip it with scissors it will tend to slide along the blade instead of getting cut, yet it is still plastic enough that if I pick it up it will tend to sag under its weight and thin out too much while I'm concentrating on getting the scissors to cut right.  My best results so far have been with leaving the candy on the marble and cutting it with a pastry scraper, but pressing down hard enough to cut all the way through with a slippery (due to the aforementioned buttered hands) pastry scraper while trying not to gouge the marble underneath is not particularly fun.  I did try pruning shears once because the curved blade holds the candy in place instead of sliding along the blade, which worked fine except for the fear of lopping off parts of a finger made it too nerve-wracking to be done quickly.
       
      Basically, I'd love to find something that works like this, but for something with the consistency of a hard caramel:
       
       
       
      Any ideas?
      -Trufflenaut
       
    • By onemorebitedelara.com
      Has anyone used Valrhona Absolut Crystal neutral glaze particularly to thicken a coulis or to glaze a tart?  If so, how did you like it and is there another glaze you think worked as well but is less expensive or can be purchased in smaller quantities?  
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...