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Creme de Violette

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How best to test out my new bottle of Rothman & Winter Creme de Violette? My first thought was the Aviation, but on looking at the double digit number of different ratios for this classic, I figured I should try something that would let me know how the liqueur would balance in a cocktail first, before picking an aviation ratio that worked for me. So I went with -

The Blue Moon

2 Oz Gin

0.5 Oz Creme de Violette

0.5 Oz Lemon Juice

0.5 Egg White (Omitted)

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with a lemon twist(omitted)

I used the recipe from Vintage Spirits and Forgotten Cocktail by Ted Haigh, but omitted his additions in favor of the original formulation. I must say, this is very pleasant. The Creme de Violette is not overly syrupy in the drink. I really like the Violette flavor, maybe a positive association with violet candies in my childhood. This balances well for me, so I will probably look for an aviation recipe that does more than a dash of the violette, but still keeps it and the maraschino in check. Sounds like a nice project for a saturday.

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You might want to try the Violet's Party:

by from The Best Craft Cocktails & Bartending with Flair, modified by Elana Lepkowski, Stir & Strain.
3 oz Añejo tequila, Partida
1 1/4 oz Crème de Violette, Bitter Truth
3/4 oz Lime juice
2 wdg Lime (as garnish)
Stir, strain, one large rock, garnish.
A huge amount of violet liqueur, but balanced by other very strong ingredients, so that you get a good sense of what the violette does to cocktails without feeling like you're dying of poison gas released by a perfume-themed supervillain.
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Rafa - that looks very interesting. How does Bitter Truth's Vioette compare to R&H? If it is drier may I want to reduce this by a bit. The flavor combo does seem interesting.

Dan - That does look interesting. Campari and Violette is an intriguing combination before I even taste it. Definitely going on my list.

Did get around to trying the Aviation today. I went with this recipe

1.5 Oz Gin

0.75 Oz Lemon Juice

0.5 Oz Maraschino

0.25 Oz Creme de Violette

Shake wih ice and strain into a cocktail glass.

Well, that must be why this is a classic. Excellent. The Maraschino does go well with the violette. It is just a very well constructed cocktail. That is what I love about trying a classic. I will be interested to experiment with other ratios as well.

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You might want to try the Violet's Party:

by from The Best Craft Cocktails & Bartending with Flair, modified by Elana Lepkowski, Stir & Strain.
3 oz Añejo tequila, Partida
1 1/4 oz Crème de Violette, Bitter Truth
3/4 oz Lime juice
2 wdg Lime (as garnish)
Stir, strain, one large rock, garnish.
A huge amount of violet liqueur, but balanced by other very strong ingredients, so that you get a good sense of what the violette does to cocktails without feeling like you're dying of poison gas released by a perfume-themed supervillain.

Tried this one tonight. I had only about an ounce left of some Don Julio Anejo, so I augmented with Piedra Azul Reposado. I am not sure if I need a more aggressive tequila, but the flavors did not mesh for me. Each of the major ingredients seemed to stick out, but I could not taste them together. So how to help flavors mesh? Bitters! A few dashes of Ango did improve things, and did some time and extra dilution from the ice. Not sure I would do this again, but I really liked the experiment. That is what is great about cocktails - nine times out of ten, even if it doesn't work, it is is interestin. Thanks for the tip Rafa!

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1 1/4 oz of violet liqueur - that's a TON! I would not touch this recipe with a ten-foot pole. :-)

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Do we need a drink called Sex and Violets? Rafa?

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1 1/4 oz of violet liqueur - that's a TON! I would not touch this recipe with a ten-foot pole. :-)

Coward (but I'm hiding in your shadow).

 

Odd quantities -- makes one huge or two small drinks.

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I was toying with the idea of a Creme de Violette drink with no citrus. I knew it would need to be just a teaspoon or so of violette with no sourness, and I felt bitter drink might be the way to go. Si I went with the obvious

 

Viol Negroni

1 Oz Gin (Beefeater)

1 Oz Sweet Vermouth (Cinzano)

1 Oz Campari

1 tsp Creme de Violette

 

Certainly not vile, this worked very nicely. It is exactly what you would expect, a slightly violette flavored Negroni. 

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1.5 ounces each of violet liqueur and St Germain...

Okay, it's getting close to cocktail time.  I know our  drink was delicious at Bayona but there seems to be more than a little skepticism as to the proportions.  Could it be that they are holding back on their signature cocktail recipe?   As we are very "green" in the mixologist role (and two main ingredients) what does our fellow eGulleters recommend as the primary or fall back ratio's  in preparing the cocktail.  

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Steve, I have not tried this drink and I think if you like it you should just drink it!

 

I would hesitate to try it if I saw it on a menu because in general I favour drinks in which the different flavour elements (bitter, sour, sweet; smoky, floral, fruity, spicy, herbal etc) maintain enough contrast to provide complexity and interest, and are balanced so as to create a satisfying drink overall. Both the liqueurs in this drink are floral and sweet, and they are present in large quantities; that means that the drink will be very floral and very sweet. It is more common to see one or other of them used in smaller amounts to add an accent than to have them as primary ingredients as here.

 

If you like this drink you could always try reducing the quantities of liqueurs (and eventually the lime if it becomes too sour) and see which way you prefer.

 

 

[A very trivial objection perhaps personal to me is that given the name I would expect this drink to bear some relation to a Dark 'n' Stormy (Goslings rum, lime, ginger beer), but it doesn't.]

 

I hope that's helpful. Enjoy your cocktail hour!

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I say damn the Elderflowers, full speed ahead! You liked it before so try it at home as written. Then if you don't like it the way they reportedly make it in the link then you can always start dialing back various ingredients.

 

If i could find enough people to help me drink a bottle of champagne, either in this, some other concoction or on its own, I would consider giving it a try. I just hate to open a bottle and not be able to finish it.

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Get some small bottles of Champagne?  At least halve your problem.  Although the clip-over Champagne stoppers seem to do a pretty good job, at least until the next day.

 

I have to agree on the recipe.  Just do it and see if it's like what you had.  The lemon and Champagne will certainly add enough acid to cut the two sweeties.

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Get some small bottles of Champagne?  At least halve your problem.  Although the clip-over Champagne stoppers seem to do a pretty good job, at least until the next day.

 

I have to agree on the recipe.  Just do it and see if it's like what you had.  The lemon and Champagne will certainly add enough acid to cut the two sweeties.

 

Yes, I did have a few splits around but didn't replace them when I used them up. Will have to keep an eye out for something decent in the junior size bottle.

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I have recently come by a bottle of Tempus Fugit Liqueur de Violettes. So of course I made an aviation. Neat, the spirit is the hue of no sky I ever hope to see:

 

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm1779670784/tt0055608?ref_=tt_pv_md_2

 

 

There is an aviation recipe on the bottle. I thought best to cut down on the violetteness and the maraschino:

 

2 oz Bombay dry

1/2 oz maraschino

1/2 oz Liqueur de Violettes

1 oz lemon juice

 

 

Too much lemon and too much perfume. But top shelf perfume. The gin is lost. Good in spite of that. Not to fear, the drink evokes the gentle light of rosy-fingered dawn.

 

And since I had nothing better to do for a few minutes:

 

1 1/2 oz Bombay dry

1/4 oz maraschino

1/2 teaspoon Liqueur de Violettes

2 teaspoons lemon juice

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My favorite Aviation recipe is something resembling 2 gin, .5 lemon, 1/4 Maraschino, and a barspoon or so Violette. Try that one?

 

That said, i've heard the Tempus Fugit stuff is distinctly different than Rothman & Winter, Monin, or anything else most of us are used to.

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Inspired by FrogPrincesse from post #125 I'm having an attention cocktail:

 

1/2 oz Jade 1901

1/2 oz Bombay Dry

1/2 oz Liqueur de Violettes (Tempus Fugit)

1/2 oz Vya Dry

 

 

Very nice, and easy to remember.  Lovely color too!  Now if I could only get my aviations to look like this.  Plus all natural color to the best of my knowledge.

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Next up, a water lily.  Not sure where the original water lily recipe came from or what the original proportions were.  I chose 3:1:1:1 to start:

 

12 teaspoons Magellan

4 teaspoons Cointreau

4 teaspoons Liqueur de Violettes (Tempus Fugit)

4 teaspoons lemon juice

 

 

Also a success.  Even better for the color.

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Jo - Richard Boccato is the creator of the Water Lilly. The original proportions are equal parts.

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So over on the Aviation thread I've been playing with making my own Creme de Violette, based on the formula linked to by FrogPrincesse in this post.  

 

The final recipe for anyone who wants to try it - (I've scaled it down to make somewhere around 750 ml)

 

Orris Tincture

25 grams powdered orris root (pharmacies can order)

200 ml 45% vodka

 

Mix these together, agitate daily for minimum of 15 days, strain through a coffee filter or proper filter.

 

 

120 ml of orris tincture

240 ml of 45% vodka

560 grams sugar

260 grams water

brilliant blue and crimson red sufficient to get the colour purple that suits  

 

This may require filtering again or clearing with a clearing agent if required.  

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