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Scott -- DFW

The Fresh Pasta Topic

213 posts in this topic

Franci, those look lovely.  I've been meaning to get back to making fresh pasta again - especially something filled, like ravioli - and see if I can get the technique down.  Your photos are inspiring.  Thanks for bringing this back up!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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On March 2, 2014 at 3:26 PM, Twyst said:

Ive been trying my hand at home made ravioli quite a bit lately, and while the results have always been delicious, my ravioli are always very wrinkly and shriveled looking when I take them out of the water.  What is causing this?

Air bubbles in the ravioli stretches the dough when cooked, then it falls back down over the pasta resulting in wrinkles.

The ideal ratio is a 2 inch round of dough to 1/2 inch mound of filling.  This gives you enough space to press out the air.

my reference for this is p 79 from Mastering Pasta by Marc Vetri.

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Thanks,  Smithy. Ravioli are so versatile and fun to make. If you go back to it, you'll enjoy. My only issue with it it seems I never make enough for my kids :D

 

 

7 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Air bubbles in the ravioli stretches the dough when cooked, then it falls back down over the pasta resulting in wrinkles.

The ideal ratio is a 2 inch round of dough to 1/2 inch mound of filling.  This gives you enough space to press out the air.

my reference for this is p 79 from Mastering Pasta by Marc Vetri.

 

And if you feel there is still air there, take a toothpick and make two tiny holes on the raviolo, at the base of the filling area and press gently to release all air.


Edited by Franci (log)
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Jeez Franci, those pics look fantastic!  Are you sure you weren't a food stylist in a former life?  I want to eat my screen...

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Franci, lovely ravioli!  Can you share your technique for filling and cutting them so uniformly?  I don't have any problems making the pasta, but my ravioli always look a little sloppy.

 

btw, I really enjoyed the videos you posted on the previous page. I've never seen anyone roll such large pasta sheets before. masterful.

 

 

 



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I really like that tray on the right Franci, might need to go order one... Have the one in the center and enjoy it. Highly recommended for speed and ease. 

 

Recently restarted the fresh pasta kick too. Did a batch of tortellini on the weekend that found their way into some reduced chicken stock flavored with parmesan and nutmeg. Filling was pork shoulder, sausage, prosciutto & mortadella, egg, parm and nutmeg (Classico e Moderno by Michael White). Have recently been rolling out the pasta sheets with a large wooden rolling pin vs using the machine. So far seems to be less finicky and easier to do as a one-man job. 

 

Added Flour + Water and Mastering Pasta to the bookshelf lately so will likely play with those for a bit.

 

 

tort.jpg

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Got a new toy, a chitarra.  I think I got a pretty good price, $37.  It's $94 on Amazon.ca.  Sheesh.

Here is my first batch.  Dough is from Mastering Pasta by Marc Vetri and is semolina, egg, and oil.  I was looking the UTube for videos on how to use and especially how thick to roll out the dough.  Sadly most of the videos are in Italian but I did manage to learn the rolling technique.  I rolled my dough out to #3 on the hand pasta roller and it made kinda square noodles which was what I was after.  They took around 8 to 9 minutes to cook.  I'm dieting at the moment and only had a few pieces but DH loved the texture.  The noodles would be a fine base for a hearty ragu.

DSC01247.thumb.jpg.388f051926a7e961ca84b

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ohgodthatlooksgood, <deep breath>

 

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 I made raviole (yes, in this case ends with e) del plin (pinch). Filling not traditional but with what I had available. I just love the texture of pasta with eggs yolks. 

 

image.thumb.jpeg.9c4b76fae89ec38d54bef47

 

image.thumb.jpeg.a7bd403ede6370a280eb31f

 

and some special shapes for a little surprise in the plate for my children (as it was for me when I was little)

image.thumb.jpeg.1a39d454ba12f0c509905d8

 

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Those look fantastic, especially the surprise shapes... Huge fan of the rustic style plin. 

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You might try using a couple of Ts of 'high gluten' flour. It will help the dough stretch.

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