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Kalamansi in desserts


tan319
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Powder or a concentrate?

Just juice, maybe reduced?

I'm curious about this product and want to try it.

I'll be going to my fave asian market later to check it out.

Thanks for any info provided~

2317/5000

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Kalamansi is a small lemon-lime found mainly in the Philippines. It is strongly sour, but has terrific citrus flavor. When I lived in Philadelphia our local Asian supermarkets carried canned Kalamansi drink (juice and sugar), but I never found any fresh fruit. Boiron produces a Kalamansi puree (I've got a kilo in the freezer, but haven't gotten around to using it yet). This may be your best bet, unless you can find fresh.

It seems to me it would make a great sorbet or ice cream, or perhaps a custard with pastry. Keep us posted.

stscam

Steve Smith

Glacier Country

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Thanks for the info, stscam.

I went to my local Asian market today, I was S.O.L.

I thought someone made a puree but couldn't find it in my purveyors.

I'll investigate furthur

BTW, the Asian market does occasionally have the fresh stuff!

2317/5000

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Kalamansi (or calamansi) juice is one of my favorite drinks in the Phillippines! You can't beat it on a hot, humid day in the islands. I've had it freshly squeezed mixed with water and sugar, and poured into a tall glass filled with ice. I also like calamansi fruit shakes. In the Phillippines the fruit is used like lemon to flavor fish, sauces, paella, etc. While I was there one time, I remember asking one of our cooks to make me some calamansi juice. Little did I realize we had no more, and I was shocked to see her in the kitchen squeezing out about 50 of these ping pong ball sized fruits into a pitcher! Definitely a lot of hard work making freshly squeezed calamansi juice. But it's so good and some love it so much, I've heard of people growing calamansi in Florida.

Stateside, I've used the syrup concentrate. It's okay, but tastes a little artificial. I've used it to make popsicles before, and they came out decent, but nothing beats the real thing. I think I've made calamansi sorbet before, and it got a good response. Personally, I thought it was okay... it's hard to like the concentrate when you know the taste of the real fresh fruit.

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We make a gelee out of it and add a disc with a caramelized pineapple cake and coconut gelato. I also used to use it as the lime in our summer ceviche, with a lot of syrup, of course. It has a wonderful acidity and sourness, but especially an exotic flavor unlike that of yuzu.

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