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London fine dining


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Recent postings on Gordon Ramsay (Royal Hospital Road) and the new Tom Aikens restaurant have suggested that some of London's best restaurants are closed on Sunday. Am I correct?

If so, is that also true for Foliage, Chez Bruce, La Trompette, Ramsay's Petrus, Pied a terre, Nobu, The Square, River Cafe, Mela, and St John, to mention a few that have been discussed on this site recently?

Am I correct in understanding that G. Ramsay has two, the eponymous estabnlishment on Royal Hospital Road in Chelsea and Petrus, and that both close on Sunday?

By 2/3 star restaurants, I don't necessarily restrict the list to those formally so designated by Michelin and the equivalent, but those in that range or aspiring to it.

By the way what very good restaurants appropriate to my category have I missed?

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That's correct; most "destination" restaurants in London tend to close Sunday (and Sat lunch). As a rule of thumb the ones which stay open are in hotels (presumably cos they have to stay open to provide victims - sorry, guests - with chow at weekends. Plus hotels have more staff/resources.

Off the top of my head Capital and Foliage open Sun. I think the Square does too.

Chez Bruce does Sunday lunch, note sure about dinner. Trompette the same.

Gordon Ramsay does not open weekends at all.

St John does not open Sundays

I'm sure people can fill you in on the rest

J

More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!
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Thanks for the quick responses.

Given the contradiction in terms between hotel and fine dining, am I wrong to assume that

Gordon Ramsay at Claridges would not be as worth visiting as his other two, Petrus and the one at Royal Hospital Road. i.e., that the food would be less imaginative and the price higher???

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Thanks for the quick responses. 

Given the contradiction in terms between hotel and fine dining, am I wrong to assume that

Gordon Ramsay at Claridges would not be as worth visiting as his other two, Petrus and the one at Royal Hospital Road. i.e., that the food would be less imaginative and the price higher???

The price is lower, the style is similar but the quality is not quite as good.

The food is actually very similar to RHR (some dishes appear pretty much identical on the menu, at least) and the pre and post-meal amuses and dibdabs &tc are pretty much the same. Only thing is the execution standards are slightly below RHR (not surprising given its a *** and Claridges is *).

If you want the "Gordon Ramsay experience" (with all the twiddly bits and bobs, penguin suits, silver trays &tc) give it a go, but if you want the best quality food try Square or Capital. Having said that I last went to Claridges over a year ago, so they may well have pulled their socks up since then

cheerio

J

More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!
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My London dining dates will not be limited to Sunday night so there is no reason to have my Gordon Ramsay experience be at a time when the options are fewer. Square and Capital have certainly been well-praised, though I note that Macrosan did not like his meal at the latter.

Any negative comment on Square?

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Chez Bruce and La Trompette also both open for Sunday dinner.

The Square is really good, no negative comments really, it is one of our favourite restaurants. Service can become erratic as the evening progresses, the head sommelier is a prat, but they have a new young lad (12? possibly 14) who is excellent. Desserts can be hit or miss (which I find strange, but they always have been).

That being said it is a restaurant we go to as often as we can and has delivered several stand out dishes and meals.

Paul

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Paul,

After reading the posts by you and Andy on Putney Bridge (separate thread), it sounds worth adding to the list. Given the distance and the relatively greater ease of travelling and parking there on a Sunday, it seems that might be a day to choose it. Not clear from the preoccupation with Sunday lunch, but is it also open on Sunday evening. I gather that it is not as elegant as some of the other places on my original list, but that it offers greater value for the price.

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Putney Bridge is not open Sunday night, it is definitely worth going to if you can get there for Sunday lunch, aside from the food, service and wine, it has a fantastic view. (you do of course have to put up with the shouting of people from Fulham and dare I say it Chelsea) (It is worth going to in the evening, but I would probably put it at or near the top of Sunday lunch places whereas there are several restaurant I would go to in the evening first).

Paul

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  • 10 months later...

I'm going to be in London for two nights on the way to and back from elsewhere. I want to go to enjoy the best restaurants but won't be traveling with a suit of a jacket.

I'm a sucker for fine dining, but like to feel comfortable and hate being the only person without a suit on. Any suggestions are appreciated.

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Great, so in a nice shirt and pants, very upmarkey looking, I can dine at Gordon Ramsey's and other fine dining establishments? I would have felt out of place in just a shirt and pants in Paris.

Thanks

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I never wear a suit nowadays in London when i eat at fine restaurants, you shouldn't have to dress up just to eat good food. the fact that you are paying should be good enough!

I tried 1880 at the Bentley the other day, the hotel is quite OTT but the dining room is suprisingly relaxed. The food is great, good grazing menu idea where you try lots of different courses and a good wine list.

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Just curious really, but if cloying is not wearing a jacket for all this travelling what is he wearing over his shirt? Personally I find that a lightweight, non-crease jacket or blazer is an essential piece of travel equipment, equally at home on a plane, street or in a restaurant.

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Just curious really, but if cloying is not wearing a jacket for all this travelling what is he wearing over his shirt?

I work in technology and don't have to dress well for work, so while traveling for work I'll just be wearing button up shirts and slacks. No need for a jacket. And I hate to bring a jacket for only one dinner, I don't have wrinkle free wear, my dress wear wrinkles...

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I hate to say this, but it is still cold here, often freezing at night and max 10C/50F during the day. It also rains (and sometimes hail or snow). Restaurants aren't that well heated either. With just a shirt and slacks (not jeans) you will be cold.

The blazer, or a decent sports jacket, is a good and useful idea. Maybe a wool pullover as well, and an overcoat.

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Just curious really, but if cloying is not wearing a jacket for all this travelling what is he wearing over his shirt?

I work in technology and don't have to dress well for work, so while traveling for work I'll just be wearing button up shirts and slacks. No need for a jacket. And I hate to bring a jacket for only one dinner, I don't have wrinkle free wear, my dress wear wrinkles...

A button up shirt without a jacket and tie just doesn't work. You'll look like the technology geek that you are - especially if the shirt has short sleeves :smile:. Try a nice turtleneck or high end knit shirt. Not Land's End. With a smart pair of pants. If you don't have a clue what I'm talking about - go to the men's department of a decent department store - or a decent men's clothing store - and have them put together a "look" for you. Tell them you want "smart casual" - and where you plan to go. By the way - my husband is (also) clueless about this stuff - but I've managed to get him a wardrobe that satisfies about 95% of all high end restaurants.

That said - London is chilly - both outside and frequently inside as well. My husband is planning to pack a jacket - and we're going in May! Robyn

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By the way: "pants" over here generally means "underwear". "Pants" in American is "trousers" or "slacks" in British. (Just in case you were thinking of ringing Gordon Ramsay and asking if you could turn up at the restaurant in nothing but a button up shirt and pants...)

Jonathan Day

"La cuisine, c'est quand les choses ont le go�t de ce qu'elles sont."

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I had a horrid meal at Tallivent the other week (report to come) - someone there was wearing jeans. its possibly the stuffiest place i've ever eaten in - so if they don't mind i wouldn't put up with any crap from any london establisment

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should we create a new link called restaurant fashion?

with all this talk about "pants" turtle-necks," and "button-ups" I'm feeling a hell of a lot of sympathy for you cloying, you must feel like your seven years old again with your mum dressing you.

(was seven too old for my mum to be dressing me, if yes change to five!)

Why don't we realise that as long as you look decent enough to walk down the street, then that is decent enough to wear to any restaurant. I'm a manager of a fine dining restaurant in London, and the one rule is if you feel good then you look good. You are giving your money to the restaurant remeber, so if they cannot accept what you are wearing then it is their problem.

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I had a horrid meal at Tallivent the other week (report to come) - someone there was wearing jeans. its possibly the stuffiest place i've ever eaten in - so if they don't mind i wouldn't put up with any crap from any london establisment

Well at least he wasn't wearing "pants" :smile: . Robyn

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