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skchai

Indian Vegetarian Food in New York Times

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The images on the multimedia show ( click on right side) are delicious.

I am curious to know what the chinese writing on Chinese mirch's crockery means. Any body care to decipher?


I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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Dear South Indian Vegetarian Chefs of the world:

PLEASE MOVE TO PHILADELPHIA AND OPEN MANY RESTAURANTS.

I beg you.

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a decent enough article but a few quibbles:

1. what does the title "after centuries the vegetarian feast of india finally arrives" mean? arrives where? has new york really been waiting for this for centuries? or does a cuisine only arrive after it arrives in new york?

2. still too much reliance on the generalized "indian" which in the context of food is pretty meaningless--there's occasional breaks into south indian and north indian but there's a whole world of south indian outside of the udupi kitchen. similarly the mustard seeds-curry leaves/tomatoes-onions division that is used to signal the difference between "south" and "north" indian doesn't really hold--the bengal kitchen, for instance, doesn't dabble very much with tomatoes in vegetable dishes. similarly the madras onion/shallot is a large part of many cuisines in south india (vegetarian and non-vegetarian).

this is the kind of thing that writers could get right if they'd talk more to the chefs they interview instead of worrying about keeping their magisterial tone.

3. when do the indians in new york get to also become new yorkers?

on the whole though the article makes me jealous of the range of indian food available in new york--though new jersey is no slouch either.

mongo "never satisfied" jones

p.s: i was impressed to read that suvir's family can track their history back to the 15th century. my paternal family can't even remember what their real surname was (the current one is a title bestowed upon a recent ancestor in the late 19th century).

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a decent enough article but a few quibbles:

...........

3. when do the indians in new york get to also become new yorkers?

on the whole though the article makes me jealous of the range of indian food available in new york--though new jersey is no slouch either.

When those indians start picking up bagel with cream cheese and coffee to go, every day during the work week from the carts outside their offices bldg. or the corner - Or is it doughnut :smile:

Move to New York mongo :cool:


anil

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I am curious to know what the chinese writing on Chinese mirch's crockery means. Any body care to decipher?

The writing on Chinese Mirch's crockery is actually Japanese - "おいしい" = "oishii" means "delicious".


Sun-Ki Chai
http://www2.hawaii.edu/~sunki/

Former Hawaii Forum Host

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p.s: i was impressed to read that suvir's family can track their history back to the 15th century. my paternal family can't even remember what their real surname was (the current one is a title bestowed upon a recent ancestor in the late 19th century).

Suvir will clarify this if he ever gets round to checking this forum again :sad: , but I'm guessing its the Hardwar/Benaras pandit tradition. Many north Indian families followed, and still do, the tradition of having a pandit in Hardwar or Benaras who kept the records of births and deaths in their family literally stretching back for centuries. Everytime someone in the family was born or died you had to travel there for religious rituals, or at least send money for the pandit to do them, and in doing so the records were updated. I forget if the archives were actually written or were entirely memorised - certainly large chunks were memorised. So its quite likely that Suvir's family can trace its roots back to the 15th century through this connection,

Vikram

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I'd love some more comments about the Dosa Hutt in Flushing. I pass it all the time on the Q27 bus but have yet to get out and have a meal there, because then I have to wait for another bus instead of just catching the 7 train right away. Also, there's a Singh's Pizza on Kissena Blvd. north of Holly Av. I guess that's unrelated to Singa's Pizza (which also has a branch further down Kissena Blvd.).


Michael aka "Pan

 

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Suvir will clarify this if he ever gets round to checking this forum again :sad: , but I'm guessing its the Hardwar/Benaras pandit tradition. Many north Indian families followed, and still do, the tradition of having a pandit in Hardwar or Benaras who kept the records of births and deaths in their family literally stretching back for centuries. Everytime someone in the family was born or died you had to travel there for religious rituals, or at least send money for the pandit to do them, and in doing so the records were updated. I forget if the archives were actually written or were entirely memorised - certainly large chunks were memorised. So its quite likely that Suvir's family can trace its roots back to the 15th century through this connection,

Vikram

We go 11 generations in Haridwar - (add two generations more as my nephew recently became a father :cool: )


anil

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p.s: i was impressed to read that suvir's family can track their history back to the 15th century. my paternal family can't even remember what their real surname was (the current one is a title bestowed upon a recent ancestor in the late 19th century).

Suvir will clarify this if he ever gets round to checking this forum again :sad: , but I'm guessing its the Hardwar/Benaras pandit tradition.

So its quite likely that Suvir's family can trace its roots back to the 15th century through this connection,

Vikram

i didn't mean to imply that i was sceptical of suvir's genealogical claim--i was actually impressed.

suvir, by the way, is still reading this forum--he dropped me a note last night on this very subject. now, if we can only get him to post again. amma must be keeping him very busy. now, what he should do is set up a computer in their lobby area that's always connected to egullet and ask his guests to post their impressions/reviews as they leave.

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p.s: i was impressed to read that suvir's family can track their history back to the 15th century. my paternal family can't even remember what their real surname was (the current one is a title bestowed upon a recent ancestor in the late 19th century).

Suvir will clarify this if he ever gets round to checking this forum again :sad: , but I'm guessing its the Hardwar/Benaras pandit tradition.

So its quite likely that Suvir's family can trace its roots back to the 15th century through this connection,

Vikram

i didn't mean to imply that i was sceptical of suvir's genealogical claim--i was actually impressed.

suvir, by the way, is still reading this forum--he dropped me a note last night on this very subject. now, if we can only get him to post again. amma must be keeping him very busy. now, what he should do is set up a computer in their lobby area that's always connected to egullet and ask his guests to post their impressions/reviews as they leave.

Thanks for being so easily impressed.

After reading from Anil, my family seems to have not had very good records at all.

But that is not what matters... Anil has so much passion, that in his own life, it seems he has filled others with great riches that come from his lineage and his own curiosity.

Mongo, you too have enriched eGullet and its boards with your unique and special perspective. That is what makes the world so wonderful.

Amma and many other things keep me very busy. Actually, I often get very little sleep for there is so very much for me to do in one day, and not enough hours to cover them in. eGullet while a great passion of mine, has had to take a back seat. What keeps me happy in that back seat, is the fact that all of you that post in this forum, hardly need my words to keep this forum alive, poignant and relevant. It is fascinating for me to come and find treasures here that keep me wanting to delve into food.... and there are many here that leave me with a lasting impression. I would be wrong in only sharing praises. eGullet like any other entity, has it pros and cons. They balance out in the same way all entities end up finding a balance. I let the cons sift into the airI do not chase after and the pros are that I enjoy and savor as I go back into my eGullet absence

I may not be here, but I am here. Friends from eGullet keep me informed through email and are kind enough to bring what they feel absolutely essential for me to read to my attention.

My cooking, my cooking classes, my teaching about food and hospitality, my travels in search of new culinary inspirations, my dining outside of Amma, my life with family and friends and my two dogs and my private life keep me plenty busy. And that is what keeps me behind on eGullet but certainly not lacking in interest or intrigue.

As for reviews/impressions by customers of the restaurant, I would hardly want that.... I enjoy hearing the customer feedback and most often, it is the most sincere and most lack lustre of feedbacks that leaves me inspired. The people that give me such feedback, are not always into leaving impressions in public settings. There are those that are very kind and leave me impressions on eGullet, and to them Hemant and I owe are most hearfelt thanks and gratitude. But similarly, we also owe plenty to the nameless and silent many that leave us inspired and working towards higher goals.

Mongo, you seem fascinating, maybe you can tell the board more about your own family. Maybe we can all learn more about India through that... when you have the time, and if you have the desire to share such information, please do.. and I hope I can be alerted to that post. Certainly a person as passionate about food as you, must have some wonderful family stories to share and some amazing family legends to reflect on and thus enrich the rest of us.

Vikram, I enjoy your posts and always crave for more. Thanks for your very generous and well researched posts. You make the world of Indian food and food in general so much more. :smile:

The pandit tradition is certainly amazing, and also there is the Kayastha tradition of documenting family additions and losses at Dussehra. If a family has maintained the record, one is saved the trip to the pandit. And the more amazing discoveries you can make are the members of the family that could write in Persian or Arabic. Many of these were mostly written in these languages, and only if the elder male figure did not write Persian or Arabic, would the document be added to in Hindi. It is a most fascinating study into ones heritage.

And yes titles that were bestowed onto many Indians have also complicated and further enriched our familial heritage. So many of us have names that would mean nothing by themselves, but as one goes into our past, one is united by a larger community that often opens doors into a culture that quickly become a world that is so familiar and yet totally unknown.

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....... now, what he should do is set up a computer in their lobby area that's always connected to egullet and ask his guests to post their impressions/reviews as they leave.

Kee lobby ?? There is no lobby -


anil

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After reading from Anil, my family seems to have not had very good records at all.

But that is not what matters... Anil has so much passion, that in his own life, it seems he has filled others with great riches that come from his lineage and his own curiosity.

No, You attribute too much to my curosity. It's just miles and FF. 11 generations is < 15th century.


anil

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  • Similar Content

    • By gsquared
      Post your questions here -->> Q&A
      A Sampling of North Indian Breads
      Authors: Monica Bhide and Chef Sudhir Seth
      Introduction
      These breads are the taste of home for me -- wholesome breads prepared with simple ingredients and simple cooking methods. There are many different types of breads in North India. They can be prepared in the tandoor (clay oven, as is done in many restaurants), dry roasted, cooked on a griddle, or deep-fried. They can be prepared plain, or stuffed with savory or sweet filling, or just topped with mouthwatering garnishes.
      In the recipes below we are merely attempting to scratch the surface, presenting you with a glimpse of these magnificent breads.
      North Indian breads are prepared with various kinds of flours. The ones listed here use a whole-wheat flour known as atta and all-purpose flour. The dough is prepared in most cases without the use of yeast. (We have shown a special sweet bread here, called Sheermal, that is prepared using yeast.) Also, the tandoori breads are generally rolled out by hand not with a rolling pin. But in the recipes below, for ease of use for the home cook, we have used a rolling pin. As you will also see then, no special equipment is needed. We have prepared the breads in a traditional oven and in a non-stick skillet. (We have included some pictures towards the end of the lesson of a roti being prepared in a commercial tandoor.)
      A few tips:
      • Knead the dough well, adding only enough water or other specified liquid to make the dough the right consistency.
      • A must for preparing these breads is to let the dough rest as indicated. This will ensure that the dough softens and moistens, making it more pliable and easier to stretch
      • To prepare simple ghee (clarified butter) see below but for a in-depth discussion check out this wonderful thread in the India forum. (See the last few suggestions on preparing it by melting butter.)
      • You can also purchase ghee or clarified butter at your local Indian grocer or from www. Namaste.com.
      Clarified Butter (Ghee)
      Yields: About ½ cup
      ½ lb unsalted butter
      Heat a heavy pan over low heat. Add the butter, allowing it to melt. Once the butter has melted, increase the heat, bringing the butter to a simmer. The butter will start to foam.
      Reduce the heat and simmer for about 15 minutes. Watch carefully as it may burn. The milk solids will start to settle at the bottom, and the liquid butter will float to the surface. When the liquid butter becomes amber in color, remove it from from the heat. Cool to room temperature.
      Strain the amber liquid into a jar and discard the milk solids.
      Cover and store, refrigerated, for up to 6 months.
      Plain Naan Dough
      Naans are traditional Indian breads prepared in clay ovens or tandoors. They are commonplace on most Indian menus. We have tried here to present a simple dough for Naans and then two of the more unusual preparations for it: the Peshawari Naan and the Onion Kulcha. .
      • ½ cup milk
      • 1 teaspoon sugar
      • 1 cup warm water
      • 1 tablespoon yogurt
      • 1 egg
      • 4 cups of all-purpose flour (labelled "maida" in Indian grocery store)
      • 1 teaspoon salt
      • 1 teaspoon baking powder
      • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil (for baking tray)
      • 2 tablespoons clarified butter or ghee
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      Oil the dough.
      Cover the dough with a damp cloth and place in a warm place for 1½ - 2 hours, or until the dough has doubled in volume.
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      Brush each oval with clarified butter.

      Place the naans on the baking sheet bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown.
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      • 1 tablespoon almonds (crushed)
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      • 1 tablespoon raisins
      • 1 teaspoon cilantro leaves, minced
      • 1 teaspoon sugar
      • 1 tablespoon Milk Mawa Powder (Dried whole milk powder)

      • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds, ground
      • 3 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter
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      While the dough is resting, prepare the filling.
      Set aside 1 tablespoon of pistachios and the raisins. In a mixing bowl combine all the other filling ingredients. Add a few tablespoons of water to bind them together to form a lumpy consistency.
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      Add a tablespoon of the filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour.

      Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter.
      Garnish with the reserved pistachios and raisins.

      Continue until you have made 8 naans.
      Brush each naan with clarified butter. Place the naans on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown.
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      Onion Kulcha
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      1 recipe prepared plain naan dough
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      • 1 tablespoon minced cilantro
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      • 1 teaspoon red chili powder
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      • 3 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter
      • 2 teaspoons cilantro, minced for garnish
      • small boiled potato, grated (optional)
      Prepare the naan dough.

      While the dough is resting, prepare the filling.

      First, using the palms of your hands, squeeze out all the water from the chopped onions. If the onions still appear to be watery, add a small boiled grated potato to your filling. This will prevent the filling from spilling out of the kulcha.
      In a mixing bowl combine all the filling to form a lumpy consistency.

      Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour.
      Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly oil or flour your hands.
      Take one portion of the dough and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter.

      Add a tablespoon of the filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour.

      Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter.

      Dip your fingers in water and moisten the surface of the kulcha very lightly. Sprinkle with a few minced cilantro leaves. Continue until you have made 8 kulchas.

      Place the kulchas on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown.
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      Ande Ka Paratha
      This is a unique addition to your recipe collection. A mild and flaky bread, it is a small kid’s favorite at our home.
      Makes 8 parathas
      • 2 cups Indian atta flour (whole-wheat flour)
      • 1½ teaspoons table salt
      • 2+2 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter
      • Water as needed
      • 8 eggs
      In a bowl combine the flour, salt and two tablespoons of clarified butter. Slowly begin to add the water, kneading the flour as you go. Make a dough, kneading for at least 10 minutes. The final dough should be soft and pliable. It should not be sticky or else it will not roll out well.


      Cover the dough with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and let it sit for 30 minutes.

      Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour.
      Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the prepared floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter.
      Now fold the dough over itself.

      Take the folded dough and roll it around itself into a spiral.

      Tuck the end under.

      Do this for all eight dough balls. (This folding and rolling will make the paratha very flaky.)

      Now flatten the spiral and roll again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter.


      Heat a griddle on medium heat. Brush it lightly with butter and add the paratha. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottom of the paratha begins to blister. Brush the top lightly with butter and remove from heat. Put the paratha aside on a warm plate.

      Grease the same griddle a bit and break an egg on it. Cook the egg sunny side up. Place the cooked side of the paratha on the egg. Press down gently to break the yolk. Let it cook for a minute. Brush the top of the paratha with butter, flip carefully and cook for another minute or two until the paratha is no longer raw.


      Remove the paratha from the griddle and place on a serving platter. Cover with a paper towel. Continue until all the parathas are cooked.
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      Indian Bread Stuffed With Spicy Potatoes (Aloo Ka Paratha)
      This filled paratha is a very popular North Indian bread, served traditionally with homemade white butter and Indian pickles of your choice.
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      • 1½ teaspoons table salt
      • 2 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter
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      • 1 tablespoon cilantro, minced
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      • 4 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter
      • A few tablespoons flour for dusting
      In a bowl combine the wheat flour, semolina flour, salt and two tablespoons of clarified butter. Slowly begin to add the water, kneading the flour as you go. Make a dough, kneading for at least 10 minutes. The final dough should be soft and pliable. It should not be sticky, or else it will not roll out well.
      Cover the dough with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and let it sit for 30 minutes.
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      Boil the potatoes in enough water to cover for about 15 minutes. Drain.



      Put the potatoes in a bowl and mash them well with a fork. Add the green chilies, cilantro, ginger root, and chaat masala and mix well. Set this filling aside to cool.
      Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour.
      Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the prepared floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter.
      Lightly brush the surface with the clarified butter. Add a tablespoon of the potato filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour.



      Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter.


      Heat a griddle on medium heat. Brush it lightly with butter and add the paratha. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottom of the paratha begins to blister. Brush the top lightly with butter and flip over. Cook for 2 minutes.

      Remove the paratha from the griddle and place on a serving platter. Cover with a paper towel. Continue until all the parathas are cooked.

      Sheermal
      A sweet bread, it is one of the few Indian breads that uses yeast. Keep the dough in a warm place to ensure that it rises. You can increase the amount of sugar if you like a sweeter taste.

      • 1 packet dry yeast
      • 1 teaspoon sugar
      • ¼ cup water
      • 1½ cups all-purpose flour
      • ¼ teaspoon salt
      • 2 tablespoons sugar
      • 2 eggs (separate 1 egg and set the yolk aside) beat the whole egg and the white together
      • 2 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter
      • Extra flour for dusting
      • Pitted cherries/raisins for garnish
      Mix yeast with the sugar and 1/4 cup water. Set aside until frothy, about 5 - 10 minutes.
      Combine the flour, salt and sugar. Add the clarified butter, egg and yeast mixture. Knead until a smooth dough is formed. (You may need more warm water.) Set aside to rise until the dough doubles in size.
      Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly dust the rolling surface and rolling pin with flour.
      Knead the dough again on the floured surface for about 5 minutes. Divide it into 6 equal pieces and cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap.
      Roll each piece into a ball and flatten it with your hands. Using a rolling pin, roll it out into a disc. Continue until you have made 6 discs.
      Beat the reserved egg yolk and brush a little on each sheermal. Place a few cherries on the sheermal for garnish. Place the discs on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes.

      Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes, or until golden brown.

      Tandoori Roti
      We wanted to show how the tandoor is used to prepare breads. These pictures are of a special roti or bread, called Tandoori Roti, being prepared in the hot tandoor or clay oven.
      The basic recipe entails preparing a dough of whole-wheat flour. (See the paratha dough prepared earlier.) The flattened rolled out discs are then cooked in the tandoor until the dark spots begin appearing on the surface of the bread.




      Post your questions here -->> Q&A
    • By rajsuman
      Inspired by a similar thread under 'General Food Topics', I wanted to know how many Indian cookbooks we collectively own on this forum. I have 43 right now, but I'm sure more will turn up from under the bed etc. I'm particularly curious about your collection Vikram, because you seem to own every Indian cookbook under the sun. Here's a picture of my very modest collection (a few on the left haven't come in the shot)

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    • By liuzhou
      Perhaps the food-related question I get asked most through my blog is “What's it like for vegetarians and vegans in China. The same question came up recently on another thread, so I put this together. Hope it's useful. It would also, be great to hear other people's experience and solutions.
       
      For the sake of typing convenience I’m going to conflate 'vegetarians and vegan' into just 'vegetarian' except where strictly relevant.
       
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      Another problem is that the Chinese word for meat (肉), when used on its own refers to pork. Other meats are specified, eg (beef) is 牛肉, literally cattle meat. What this means is that when you say you don't eat meat, they often think you mean you don't eat pork (something they do understand from the Chinese Muslim community), so they rush off to the kitchen and cook you up some stir fried chicken! I've actually heard a waitress saying to someone that chicken isn't meat. Also, few Chinese wait staff or cooks seem to know that ham is pig meat. I have also had a waitress argue ferociously with me that the unasked for ham in a dish of egg fried rice wasn't meat.
       
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      To go back to Buddhism and Taoism, it is a mistake to assume that genuine followers of either (or more usually a mix of the two) are necessarily vegetarian. Many Chinese Buddhists are not. In fact, the Dalai Lama states in his autobiography that he is not vegetarian. It would be very difficult to survive in Tibet on a vegetarian diet.
       
      There are vegetarian restaurants in many places (although the ones around where I am never seem to last more than six months). In the larger cities such as Beijing and Shanghai they are more easily findable.
       
      Curiously, many of these restaurants make a point of emulating meat dishes. The menu reads like any meat using restaurant, but the “meat” is made from vegetable substitutes (often wheat gluten or konjac based).
       
      To be continued
    • By David Ross
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q8zTVlZ19c
       
      Mmmm.  The sweet, spiced aroma of a freshly baked pumpkin pie wafting over the Thanksgiving table.  A large bowl of chilled, sweetened cream is passed around the table, a cool dollop of cream cascading over a slice of “homemade” pumpkin pie.  (In many households, removing a frozen pie from a box and putting it in a hot oven is considered “homemade.”).
       
      Americans can’t seem to get enough pumpkin pie during the Holidays.  Some 50 million pumpkin pies are sold for Thanksgiving dinner and according to astute company marketing executives, 1 million of the pies are sold at Costco. And Mrs. Smith sells a few million of her oven-ready, frozen pumpkin pie.
       
      In August of 2013, we debuted the Summer Squash Cook-Off (http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145452-cook-off-63-summer-squash/)
      where we presented a number of tasty zucchini and patty pan dishes showcasing summer squash. But our squash adventure wasn’t over.  Today we expand our squash lexicon with the debut of eG Cook-Off #71: Winter Squash.
       
      (Click here http://forums.egulle...cook-off-index/ for the complete eG Cook-Off Index).
       
      Cut into jack-o-lanterns for Halloween and crafted into cheesecake for Thanksgiving, pumpkin reigns supreme each Fall.  But pumpkin is just one variety of winter squash--squash that grows throughout the summer and is harvested in fall.  The acorn, butternut, spaghetti, hubbard, kabocha, red kuri, delicata, calabaza and cushaw are but a few of the many winter squash cousins of the pumpkin.
       
      Winter squash is not always the best looking vegetable in the produce section--knobby, gnarled and multi-colored, winter squash has a hard, tough skin.  Peel back the unfashionable skin and sweet, rich squash meat is revealed. 
       
      Winter squash cookery doesn’t end after the last slice of pumpkin pie.  You can stuff it with a forcemeat of duck confit and sautéed mushrooms, purée roasted squash into a creamy soup garnished with lardons or slowly braise squash with peppers and corn in a spicy Caribbean stew. 
       
      Please join us in sharing, learning and savoring winter squash.

    • By Suvir Saran
      What role do they play in your Indian kitchen?
      Do you use it in other dishes you prepare? Maybe even outside of the Indian food realm.
      Do you find it easy to find Cilantro?
      What parts of cilantro do you use?
      How do you keep it fresh?
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