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Shabu Shabu


Daniel
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can someone explain shabu shabu to me?

this is where you pay to eat at a restaurant and they make you cook the food yourself??

-mjr

�As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I lost the empty feeling and began to be happy, and to make plans.� - Ernest Hemingway, in �A Moveable Feast�

Brooklyn, NY, USA

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can someone explain shabu shabu to me?

this is where you pay to eat at a restaurant and they make you cook the food yourself??

-mjr

Are you been serious, or were you commenting that you were surprised that you had to pay to cook your own food. The ingrediants still cost money, and so does the equipment you are using. As does the electricity and the roof over your head that they are allowing you to benifit from.

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can someone explain shabu shabu to me?

this is where you pay to eat at a restaurant and they make you cook the food yourself??

-mjr

Are you been serious, or were you commenting that you were surprised that you had to pay to cook your own food. The ingrediants still cost money, and so does the equipment you are using. As does the electricity and the roof over your head that they are allowing you to benifit from.

And the broth is a bit of a production to produce. It would take a bit (not that much) of time at home to produce, not unlike many other recipes I order in restaurants.

Shabu shabu makes much more sense to me than the new(er) influx of steak places where one sizzles one's own gristle. Those are less attractive than a salad bar. And they make less sense.

Rice pie is nice.

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And the broth is a bit of a production to produce. It would take a bit (not that much) of time at home to produce, not unlike many other recipes I order in restaurants.

It's just plain 'ol unseasoned hot water!

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Both places that were listed in the beginning of the thread will be excellent choices for first time shabu shabu eaters. As you add your ingredients to that unseasoned water, you start to create what will be (if you are patient) a flavorful and filling meal. "Shabu shabu " is the sound in English "swish swish" or that sound of fish or thin slices of meat being "swished" through the broth to be cooked. It is interesting that this type of dish is also about your focus on how fresh the product is and appreciation for your own ability to enjoy it.

Edited by slkinsey (log)
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You said both places would be good for first time swish swishers.. Is there a better place for more experienced shabu shabists? I actually called megu the other day and they said they were eventually going to provide it there.

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Katsuhama has Shabu Shabu on its menue. I have never eaten Shabu Shabu at there, so I have no idea how great or how poor it is. Considering the taste of other pork dishes they offer, I think their Shabu Shabu is worth a try.

Katsuhama

11 E 47th street

Check out the latest meal!

Itadakimasu

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A freind recomended Grand Sichuan Chinese Resteraunt on Canal specifically for shabu shabu. He lives in China and was impressed with what they offer. Unfortunately I can not vouch for the quality as I have not been there yet to try it myself.

I beliee there are other GSCR locations in Mnhattan, if Canal is not convenient.

Happy hunting...

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Another place that does good shabu shabu is Lan, on 3rd and 8th (I believe). Unlike many of these places, they also take reservations...

To point out a slight issue with a previous poster's comment, the Chinese do not do shabu shabu, they do something called hoi gau. (pronounced like "hwah gwah"). Shabu shabu is normally done in water with a big piece of konbu (seaweed) in it for flavoring, hoi gau is normally done in a broth mixture. Also, shabu shabu is normally served with a variety of sauces, while hoi gau is generally served with Chinese barbecue sauce.

I would seriously recommend for anyone who likes shabu shabu or hoi gau to look into buying an electric skillet and doing it themselves at home. It literally pays for itself after you've made it 2 or 3 times. You can get excellent quality meat for shabu shabu in many Japanese markets (such as M2M or Sunrise Mart) or in Little Korea. In particular, I recommend the Zojirushi Gourmet d'Expert skillet (http://www.zojirushi.com/gourmet.html). It's what we have at home, and it's great.

Hope this is helpful to people.

I want pancakes! God, do you people understand every language except English? Yo quiero pancakes! Donnez moi pancakes! Click click bloody click pancakes!

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