Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Edible Flowers?


pattimw
 Share

Recommended Posts

On the occasions that I've used them, I get them at the greenmarket. The guys I buy them from grow raise flowers specifically for eating.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whole Foods carries organic un-sprayed roses, also may want to do an internet search (herbfarm in seattle, out of a flower in NY) or call a produce wholesaler in your area.

In NYC the green market has them, quite expensive though, may want to make a deal with then to get the petals that fall off or the ones they trim in addition to whichever you buy

"sometimes I comb my hair with a fork" Eloise

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's the rose petal sorbet recipe - it's from Joanne Weir's new cookbook, Cooking in the City:

1 c. sugar

1 c. water

Rose petals from 6 unsprated, strongly perfumed red roses

1 bottle champagne or sparkling wine

Place the sugar, water, and rose petals in a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Remove from the heat anad pour into a bowl. Refrigerate overnight. The next day, strain and squeeze as much syrup out of the rose petals as possible. Measure the rose syrup. For each cup of rose syrup, add 2 cups of champagne and stir together. Refrigerate the remaining champagne. Pour the mixture into and ice cream maker and freeze according to the manufacturer's instructions.

To serve, scoop the rose petal sorbet into glasses and pour a generous dash of the remaining champagne over the sorbet at the table.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You'll need to find someone who knows where the roses are coming from. Many commercial growers use systemic pesticides and fungicides and you don't want to be eating them. I'd also try to seek out some restaurants that are noted for using fresh herbs, greens, etc., as I think they'd be more than willing to help you find a source.

(And gee, I always thought it was Lily vonSchtoop, aber Ich bin nicht Berliner....and I don't recall the ASCII code for an umlaut...and "Let's face it, I'm tired!") :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(And gee, I always thought it was Lily vonSchtoop, aber Ich bin nicht Berliner....and I don't recall the ASCII code for an umlaut...and "Let's face it, I'm tired!")  :wink:

If it makes you feel any better, I've gotton a tip from e-gullet honchos that it is actually preferred not to use special accents on words because it makes searching more difficult, if not impossible... :smile:

edited to add: another way to make rose-infused desserts (i.e. if you don't need the petals) is to use rose geranium leaves. Can grow the plant yourself assuring absence of pesticides and they have an incredible strong aroma. I've used them to make rose-flavored creme anglaise (served with a pound or angel food cake).

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

pattimw -

I'm not sure where you are located, but I highly recommend (retail) Quail Mountain Herbs from Watsonville, California. I use their flowers often and they are very fresh, rarely blemished and are grown without the use of pesticides or herbicides. They also seem to have the largest variety. :smile: (bachelor buttons, calendulas, english daisy, dianthus, geraniums, johnny jump ups, lavender, marigolds, mums, nasturtiums, pansies, roses and a mixed box)

Giant Eagle, one of our local grocery stores stocks their flowers and herbs and I'm in the process of working out what we need for the restaurant with one of the produce managers for a wholesale cost break. :cool:

To contact Quail Mountain, phone: 831-722-8456 The fella in charge of sales (who can check where in your area they are sold) is named Chick. He's a very pleasant and friendly guy very happy to help you with any questions.

http://www.quailmountain.com

That's the best I could recommend. I've looked into food purveyor Northern Haserot, but they only sell mixed flowers, 100 count per bag for $20. That doesn't work for me because I want specific ones, but they are my sole resource for edible, pesticide free orchids.

Good luck, and I hope some of this helps.

edit: clarity

Edited by beans (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

I have been curious about this same topic so I thought I'd bump it up instead of starting a new one.

I am wanting to start experimenting with desserts and the restaurants I am currently in uses a lot of them for both savory and pastry. They have this company that privides them all the edible flowers already selected and packaged.

Is there any online resources you know for ordering edible flowers, or somewhere in NYC that specifically sells flowers for cooking????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...