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Molded and Filled Chocolates: Troubleshooting and Techniques


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On 7/14/2021 at 9:34 PM, Kerry Beal said:

@Stephen Beaumont welcome to eG. Sorry we didn't properly greet you back in March. 

 

When you say Lakeshore - which lake are we talking?

 

Lake St Clair - near Windsor, not far from Michelle from Sweetness Chocolates. No problem about not greeting me :)  I have been lurking a lot on the eGullet forum and it is fascinating. Learning a lot and everyone is so helpful. My little sideline chocolate business has taken off faster than I could have dreamed  (@Chokfinechocolates on IG and FB) and I can't wait to be able to meet people in person again, hopefully soon.

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7 hours ago, Stephen Beaumont said:

Lake St Clair - near Windsor, not far from Michelle from Sweetness Chocolates. No problem about not greeting me :)  I have been lurking a lot on the eGullet forum and it is fascinating. Learning a lot and everyone is so helpful. My little sideline chocolate business has taken off faster than I could have dreamed  (@Chokfinechocolates on IG and FB) and I can't wait to be able to meet people in person again, hopefully soon.

Indeed - we will expect you at our next Chocolate Workshop! 

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The tricky bit with egg based fillings is heating it enough to pasteurise it and increase the “yolkiness” without it curdling, I played around with a french toast filling not long after I started a year ago and while it tasted nice the “egg” wasn’t really discernable, just felt like a really rich ganache

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4 hours ago, Jonathan said:

The tricky bit with egg based fillings is heating it enough to pasteurise it and increase the “yolkiness” without it curdling, I played around with a french toast filling not long after I started a year ago and while it tasted nice the “egg” wasn’t really discernable, just felt like a really rich ganache

 

Thanks for that helpful information, which is exactly what I guessed would be the case.  As I said previously about a "custard ganache," the egginess probably gets lost with the other flavorings of the ganache since the flavoring has to be strong enough to stand up to the chocolate used in the shell (and likely the ganache as well).  So many flavors that seem as if they would be delicious in a ganache--elderflower comes to mind--get lost when molded (or are so subtle as to be recognizable only when the chocolatier points them out).  Elderflower popped into my mind as I just finished a piece of toast with delicious rhubarb and elderflower jam made by a friend.  I had to stop myself from the first thought that came to mind:  wouldn't this be delicious in a bonbon?

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I think with most of the subtle flavours I've leaned towards white chocolate which I typically don't like but tends to be neutral enough with a backdrop as well as increasing the quantity of cocoa butter in the ganache to lower the sweetness. I've had some success with elderflower using a combination of a flavour extract and Saint Germain liqueur but I personally am not the biggest white chocolate fan either so it's a bit of a downer to have to use it

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58 minutes ago, Jonathan said:

I think with most of the subtle flavours I've leaned towards white chocolate which I typically don't like but tends to be neutral enough with a backdrop as well as increasing the quantity of cocoa butter in the ganache to lower the sweetness. I've had some success with elderflower using a combination of a flavour extract and Saint Germain liqueur but I personally am not the biggest white chocolate fan either so it's a bit of a downer to have to use it

 

I agree about white chocolate (and so many customers just reject it without even tasting it).  I think sometimes it is the best choice (strawberry comes to mind).  Thanks for the tip about elderflower extract.

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