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Molded and Filled Chocolates: Troubleshooting and Techniques


rookie
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I have a similar? problem. I am not sure what caused this today? I sprayed the mold half with bronze and half with black. I then sprayed white CB over the entire mold. Why did I get this problem? Was the CB too hot? I polished the molds with Everclear and then with a dry cotton ball. Any ideas?

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5 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Unfortunately I need to contribute to this topic. In the chocolate below, notice the crack running across the shell. This happened to several pieces at various places in the shell.

 

dutton.jpg.5b145d49927f94e06cbbbf4c43399878.jpg

 

In trying to determine what was happening, I thought of another time I had a similar crack, and that was in the Easter eggs I made earlier this year. That time some of the cracks developed over time as the eggs sat. I thought it might have something to do with the larger size of the piece or with the filling (it occurred with several ganaches). The filling in the bonbon above is a layer of apricot pâte de fruit (on top, immediately under the dome) with a layer of almond gianduja below it. What the eggs and the bonbon above have in common is that the coloring contains a large amount of white cocoa butter. In this case I mixed the apricot color from red, orange, yellow, and a lot of white, and the yellow marbled with it is yellow c.b. with a substantial amount of white. In the case of the eggs, I backed the outside colors with a lot of white to make the decoration opaque. Could white cocoa butter cause something like this? This would be one more strike against it, adding to the obnoxious aroma and taste it has. Of course, any explanation begs the question of why the defect didn't occur with the bonbon immediately next to it in the mold.

So they came out of the molds and looked this way immediately? 

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2 hours ago, dhardy123 said:

I have a similar? problem. I am not sure what caused this today? I sprayed the mold half with bronze and half with black. I then sprayed white CB over the entire mold. Why did I get this problem? Was the CB too hot? I polished the molds with Everclear and then with a dry cotton ball. Any ideas?

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Don't know Dave - but it looks startlingly beautiful!

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4 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I don't know if it's significant, but the decorated mold was sitting for a few days before the shell was made

 

Did you check the decoration before filling with chocolate for the shells?  Are you sure it wasn't already cracked, either from getting bumped or simply because chocolate contracts?

 

 

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@Jim D. spit balling here, but how thin were the shells where this is happening? Could it have occurred while you were removing the bonbons from the mold? I’ve gotten a little carried away a couple of times when cracking my bonbons out of the molds and found some hairline fractures on a few of them.

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8 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Yes, they did. In the case of the Easter eggs I referred to, some had hairline cracks when they came out of the molds, some appeared to develop them later.

Was it a very thin layer of chocolate each time? I've had more through and through cracks when that happens. Oops see everyone has beat me too it!

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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7 hours ago, Daniel D said:

@Jim D. spit balling here, but how thin were the shells where this is happening? Could it have occurred while you were removing the bonbons from the mold? I’ve gotten a little carried away a couple of times when cracking my bonbons out of the molds and found some hairline fractures on a few of them.

The shells weren't all that thin. I was using white chocolate that was crystallizing as fast as I could deal with that issue. And these are new molds that are shallower than I am used to. I was dealing with the fact that shells made in shallow cavities want to come out of the mold prematurely. I had to watch them very carefully to make sure they were still in place and level, so they definitely weren't sticking. With other molds (especially domes. which tend to stick for me) I have had the problem you describe when banging them on the counter.

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16 hours ago, keychris said:

is it a crack in the couverture or just the cocoa butter? If it's a thick layer of white, perhaps it had fully contracted and then the couverture contracted as well and caused some sort of crack? I have no idea really, just throwing ideas out there :D

I found a piece with the shell made from dark chocolate. It was difficult to tell how deep the crack went, but I think I could see dark chocolate in the crack, meaning it went all the way through the cocoa butter decoration down to the couverture.

 

I wonder if it's significant at all (reaching for straws here, when I know the final answer is going to be "who knows why things happen to chocolate?"), but both cracked shells held pâte de fruit as the bottom layer of the finished piece. In one case it was quite firm, in the other, it was softer, so that probably is not a factor.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I did another batch, taking more care to fill a tad less and heat the chocolate a bit more after reaching temper, and I think it worked well!  No big issues with bottoming and only a few leaks later on.  They got some scuffs in transit over the holidays, but my family had no complaints, and I'm always a big fan of the shine they get from the molds.  This batch was half caramels and half nougat.  

 

Kerry, I've been considering the workshop, and even have family nearby.  Is there an estimate of price?  I'm in Alaska, so it'd be a longshot, but I'm definitely interested.  

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19 hours ago, WayUpNorth said:

 

Kerry, I've been considering the workshop, and even have family nearby.  Is there an estimate of price?  I'm in Alaska, so it'd be a longshot, but I'm definitely interested.  

 

 

Those don't look like they belong here in the backroom thread!

 

Looking back to the Toronto event - I think we were aiming for about $150 each with another $50 for the Saturday dinner - I haven't crunched the numbers yet - I think our costs to rent at the college are higher this year - and I sure know the price of food has gone up in the past while - so we are likely looking at around $175 each and perhaps $65 for the dinner on Saturday. Master's classes I believe were around $130 each and limited to 10 participants. I'll be collecting ahead this time so that the cancellations don't come out of my pocket. If you can't come then your 'ticket' can be sold, given etc to someone else but I won't be in a position to refund.

 

Keep an eye on the thread and I'll let you know estimated costs more clearly when I've had a chance to crunch the numbers.

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/10/2018 at 8:56 PM, WayUpNorth said:

I did another batch, taking more care to fill a tad less and heat the chocolate a bit more after reaching temper, and I think it worked well!  No big issues with bottoming and only a few leaks later on.  They got some scuffs in transit over the holidays, but my family had no complaints, and I'm always a big fan of the shine they get from the molds.  This batch was half caramels and half nougat.  

 

Kerry, I've been considering the workshop, and even have family nearby.  Is there an estimate of price?  I'm in Alaska, so it'd be a longshot, but I'm definitely interested.  

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Way up north, I’m in AK too! Nice to see a fellow Alaskan on here! 

JB Chocolatier

www.jbchocolatier.com

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/3/2018 at 10:38 PM, JenBunk said:

Way up north, I’m in AK too! Nice to see a fellow Alaskan on here! 

I know, maybe we should do a far-NW meetup sometime!  I'm definitely a novice, but I feel like I've read a lot of recipes and theory, and I've been lurking here for a long time, too. 

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  • 1 month later...
4 hours ago, Chocolot said:

Not really sure what I'm looking at, but a few observations: Molds filled too full, ganache not allowed to setup overnight. Colors are fun.

Thanks a lot about the colors.

You are right, I used a ginger-passion fruit ganache wich is very soft, and was kind on a hurry, so it didn't set up properly, tried cheating with an hour or so at the fridge tho.

I tried filling one of the molds a bit more than normal to avoid a thick layer of chocolate in the middle of the bombón, maybe that's the culprit but it was intended.

I first closed the mold Wich if filled the most, then with a cornet added chocolate to the second mold (wich is filled normally), passed the heat gun over the first mold to soften the chocolate and allow it to merge, and then sandwiched the molds.

Maybe there is problems with the technique I'm using?

Any heads up appreciated.

P.d. excuses for my English, not my main language

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25 minutes ago, felipetruji said:

I tried filling one of the molds a bit more than normal to avoid a thick layer of chocolate in the middle of the bombón, maybe that's the culprit but it was intended.

I first closed the mold Wich if filled the most, then with a cornet added chocolate to the second mold (wich is filled normally), passed the heat gun over the first mold to soften the chocolate and allow it to merge, and then sandwiched the molds.

 

Is this mold meant to be used that way?  I think you'd have better luck capping both halves then sticking the bottoms together. 

 

 

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With the double molds I've found it most successful if you fill with something like gianduja that will hold itself together if the chocolate fails. A thin layer of very warm chocolate on the back of one or both of the sides before slapping them together holds the two sides together. 

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25 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Is this mold meant to be used that way?  I think you'd have better luck capping both halves then sticking the bottoms together. 

 

 

The molds have the holes to fit them together, however I don't have the pins.

I use some popstick sticks to hold them together.

5 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

With the double molds I've found it most successful if you fill with something like gianduja that will hold itself together if the chocolate fails. A thin layer of very warm chocolate on the back of one or both of the sides before slapping them together holds the two sides together. 

 Will try that technique next batch and report

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4 minutes ago, felipetruji said:

The molds have the holes to fit them together, however I don't have the pins.

I use some popstick sticks to hold them together.

 Will try that technique next batch and report

And push them together very firmly while wet.

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  • 3 weeks later...

First attempt with real Chocolate World molds rather than cheap Amazon knock-offs. Cocoa butter stuck to the molds and cracked bars. Sigh. 

 

I’ll take any any advice you have on getting bars with inclusions out of the mold without cracking them—I snapped the mold down like I do for bonbons not thinking about the irregular surface on the back side—and also tempering cocoa butter for painting. I’ve read the airbrushing thread, like, 6 times but I haven’t found much advice about prepping the cocoa butter for painting with brushes, finger, etc. I just heated gently in short low-power bursts in the microwave to the temperature indicated on the bottle. Some came out beautifully. Others stuck (I even had to freeze them for a few minutes). This has happened with other molds as well. The chocolate was tempered beautifully—I’m pretty sure it’s a CB issue. 

 

That said, the shine on the bars and on the ones that came out is super satisfying—I can’t wait to play again :) .

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7 hours ago, Pastrypastmidnight said:

First attempt with real Chocolate World molds rather than cheap Amazon knock-offs. Cocoa butter stuck to the molds and cracked bars. Sigh. 

 

I’ll take any any advice you have on getting bars with inclusions out of the mold without cracking them—I snapped the mold down like I do for bonbons not thinking about the irregular surface on the back side—and also tempering cocoa butter for painting. I’ve read the airbrushing thread, like, 6 times but I haven’t found much advice about prepping the cocoa butter for painting with brushes, finger, etc. I just heated gently in short low-power bursts in the microwave to the temperature indicated on the bottle. Some came out beautifully. Others stuck (I even had to freeze them for a few minutes). This has happened with other molds as well. The chocolate was tempered beautifully—I’m pretty sure it’s a CB issue. 

 

That said, the shine on the bars and on the ones that came out is super satisfying—I can’t wait to play again :) .

91A4047D-7E7E-49AC-9A44-6EC3A7F25FBB.jpeg

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I think it's fair to say there are as many opinions on how to treat your coloured cocoa butter as there are participants on the board. When I'm using a finger or paint brush - then I like to partially melt the bottle, give it a good shake and go. When I'm spraying I usually heat the cocoa butter to around 35º C and don't bother to do anything to temper it.

 

I find a brand new mold often gives me trouble until I've used it a couple of times. 

 

Re the inclusions - a quick twist of the mold then coax them out onto your hand has worked for me when I've got a lot of inclusions.

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