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Molded and Filled Chocolates: Troubleshooting and Techniques


rookie
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It's dark chocolate which is more prone to leakage than milk or dark mixed with milk.   The better tempered it is, the more it contracts, and if the caramel is even a degree or two cooler than usual it expands a bit more than usual - you might get a leak you didn't have before.

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I've had that happen occasionally, and it seemed to be when my caramels were a little too soft.  The last batch I made came out a perfect consistency (I gave up relying on a thermometer since they are never right and use the ball in ice water test), and I only had one have a corner leak.  When they would come out too firm, they never leaked. 

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Thanks for all the replies! After reading all these and mulling it over for A LOT of time, I've concluded that the chocolate was probably a bit over-crystalized as it was towards the end of our work cycle, and it probably just contracted too quickly as Kerry pointed out. 

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Hi!

 

I'm just starting out and have my first holiday bazaar coming up. Until I really figure out whether I'm any good at this (meaning will people actually pay me for my chocolates!), I have only bought one each of three molds. My question is, how do I go about making lots of the same molded chocolate if I only have one mold (16 - 24 pieces in each mold). I plan on filling the shells I create with ganache. If I let the ganache crystallize 24 hours, then it will take me days to make just one type of chocolate. Do anyone have strategies for limited molds and lots of chocolates? I'd love to hear your experiences.  Thank you.

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Like a few others on this forum I've gone to one style of mold with varying decorations.  That said, I have a relatively limited ability for output so I balance my moldeds with hand dipped, and some people do truffles as well.  That combo allows me to fill my boxes and not get bogged down in crystalization hold ups.

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I don't think it can be done with your 3 different molds.  I would instead get 3 of the same mold (something very basic) - bang them out 3 molds at a time with some sort of feature that tells you one ganache from another.  

 

There is a chocolatier (that got money from the folks on Dragon's den) in my area that seems to have it figured out.  Essentially all his moulded chocolates were made in the same mold.  He then added two dots of colour to the top of each to indicate which filling it had.  

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I don't think it can be done with your 3 different molds.  I would instead get 3 of the same mold (something very basic) - bang them out 3 molds at a time with some sort of feature that tells you one ganache from another.  

 

There is a chocolatier (that got money from the folks on Dragon's den) in my area that seems to have it figured out.  Essentially all his moulded chocolates were made in the same mold.  He then added two dots of colour to the top of each to indicate which filling it had.  

 

Is this the man (and the chocolates) you mean, Kerry? 

 

http://www.forratschocolates.ca/our-chocolates.aspx

 

I was just watching Dragons' Den as I was reading this..... 

Edited by FauxPas (log)
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You can make a large batch of soft ganache and warm small amounts when you need to fill shells, or make firmer ganache that sets up quickly.  Butter ganache sets up very quickly, you could fill and cap in an hour.  Greweling's book has a section on butter ganache, you mix tempered chocolate into butter, add liquor or flavor, and pipe or slab. 

 

Gfron1is right, adding a few non-molded items will make it easier on you.  Nut clusters, mendiants, and dipped candied peel or dried fruit are easy ways to add variety. 

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You say you want molded, but a majority of the people producing chocolates are doing them slab style. Using transfer sheets, home made frame and a sharp knife I can do 100's in a few hours.

 

Chef Carlton Brooks CCE, CEPC

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Aluminum bars can be cut for you by the Metal Supermarket if you happen to be in north america.  Slabbed ganache recipes - I'd consult Greweling and use his proportions for the basic slab but up the flavours.

 

How's your dipping?

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Aluminum bars can be cut for you by the Metal Supermarket if you happen to be in north america.  Slabbed ganache recipes - I'd consult Greweling and use his proportions for the basic slab but up the flavours.

 

How's your dipping?

I have a feeling my dipping skills are about to vastly improve! :-) Thanks for the Metal Supermarket recommendation - I'm in Seattle and there are 2 nearby. This made my day. Thanks again.

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I have a feeling my dipping skills are about to vastly improve! :-) Thanks for the Metal Supermarket recommendation - I'm in Seattle and there are 2 nearby. This made my day. Thanks again.

If you don't have someone at home to buff the ends for you to remove the sharp edges - pay a little extra and get the Metal Supermarket guys to do that for you.  I highly recommend taking chocolate for the fellows there - it has resulted in a 'chocolate discount' the many times I've had them cut things for me.

 

There is a primer on dipping somewhere here on eG - it was done by Alanamoana - I shall see if I can find it for you and link to it if someone doesn't beat me to it.

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If you don't have someone at home to buff the ends for you to remove the sharp edges - pay a little extra and get the Metal Supermarket guys to do that for you.  I highly recommend taking chocolate for the fellows there - it has resulted in a 'chocolate discount' the many times I've had them cut things for me.

 

There is a primer on dipping somewhere here on eG - it was done by Alanamoana - I shall see if I can find it for you and link to it if someone doesn't beat me to it.

Thanks. I called and the Metal Supermarket quote was so inexpensive compared to finished frames I've seen online. I like the idea of taking them some chocolates - nice touch! They did ask  if I preferred food grade stainless steel over aluminum - I wasn't sure which is better. 

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Stainless weighs a ton - I started out with stainless bars then went over to the aluminum when I realized how much more I could get for less money and how much less they weighed.  Couldn't open one of my drawers due to the weigh of the stainless bars.

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  • 3 months later...

Ok I haven't made chocolate in years. I feel like I'm starting all over again so I'm sorry in advance for all the posts from me :-) But is it just me or does this happen to others? I need to know if there are others out there because I am getting so frustrated!! My molded chocolates don't come out of their shell!! There's no flipping the mold over and beautiful chocolates falling gracefully out. It's me banging, banging, getting one, banging some more, refrigerating, more banging... You get the picture. When they come out they are beautiful and have a nice temper snap when you bite in. What am I doing wrong?????

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Depends on the mold. If they're coming out shiny they still could be off temper just slightly. I have the same issue but its because I use really deep dome molds which don't like releasing because of suction. If you aren't already, try the 5-10 minutes in the freezer trick and see what happens.

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Yes one of the moods I usually use is a deep dome one. I do put it in the freezer for five to ten minutes. Are you supposed to flip right away or leave it for ten minutes to come to room temperature before flipping? I'm using the Rev2 tempering machine.

This happened today. (See pic) I don't know why that happened.

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I have used the freezer for stubborn molds (as much as a half-hour, occasionally even more) and then tried again to unmold (while the chocolates are still cold and presumably contracted from the mold).  Unless I have really messed up the temper, all the pieces have eventually released.  Most experts advise against using the freezer, but I have found it works and have never had any condensation on the chocolates or other ill effects.

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