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Last week, I used some of my precious Ono Hawaiian Seasoning (I am utterly addicted and brought back 4 bottles on my last trip to Maui! but that is another seasoning and another story...) and made Sam Choy's Oven Style BBQ Chicken with Spanish Smoked Paprika. I was a little worried my son would not care for it but he loved it. Me too! Mmmmmm crispy, salty, smokey paprika chicken skin. :wub:

Basically, mix 3 tbsp Ono seasoning & 4 tbsp paprika. Rub mixture all over chicken inside & out. Marinate anywhere from 2 hrs to overnight and bake in 350 oven 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

*since I was using smoked paprika, I went about 50/50 with the seasoning mix.

Ingredients from Ono Hawaiian Seasoning label: Salt, Cracked Pepper, Ginger, Garlic and Alae Salt.

enjoy!

N.

"The main thing to remember about Italian food is that when you put your groceries in the car, the quality of your dinner has already been decided." – Mario Batali
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So, this isn't paprika but it started that way so I put the Southwest Chicken Stroganoff into RecipeGullet. It is definitely good enough to do again. And, you could use paprika as well.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Has anyone else used Bittersweet Smoked Paprika (Pimentón Agridulce)?

I am not quite sure what to do with it.

The flavor of the La Chinata Hot and Mild are very similar differing only in heat. The bittersweet seems to me to be pretty different. In fact, I think it is milder than the "Mild".

Anyway, I'm just curious for some recipes would show it off for its unique flavor.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Hello Everyone!

I've read this entire thread and have enjoyed it ALOT. I wanted to share my favorite paprika dish with you all, so here it is. The recipe is from a Riceland Rice recipe booklet I've had since the 70's. I love it because I like the taste of the paprika and the bacon blended together.

You can bet I'll be trying the Creamy Chicken recipe soon; though I think I'll try the 'oven' recipe. (Should warm up the cold kitchen nicely so I can make some bread; since the cooking time is so long.)

Hungarian Gulyas

2 strips bacon, coarsely chopped

1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef

2 1/2 cups coarsely chopped onion

2 teaspoons salt

3 tablespoons paprika

2 cans (1 pound each) diced tomatoes

2 1/2 cups cooked rice

1/2 cup water

Cook bacon in a large skillet. Sit bacon aside and pour drippings into a small bowl. In same skillet add ground beef and onions; cook until meat is brown and onions are beginning to brown. Add bacon fat if mixture begins to stick. Sprinkle with salt and paprika. Add tomatoes and bacon. Mix well. Cover and simmer about 45 minutes. Add small amounts of water if mixture cooks dry. Stir in rice and water. Heat until rice is hot. Add extra water if thinner mixture is desired.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Note: I know it is unhealthy these days, but I always add some of the bacon grease wither I need it or not. It makes the dish taste even better than it already is. I've always used hickory smoked bacon in the recipe.

Enjoy the flavor,

Amoreena

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Thanks for the tip, Amoreena. I agree completely about paprika and bacon being a great combo. In fact, I'm going to be curing some paprika bacon of my own this week. I've never done it before but I think it's going to turn out great.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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  • 1 month later...

George Erdosh has a great piece about goulash and one of its essential components, Hungarian paprika, in today's Chicago Tribune:

One of Hungary's gifts to cooks, aside from paprika, is the glorious meal-in-a-pot Hungarian goulash, gulyas. In American kitchens, Hungarian cuisine has been eclipsed by Mediterranean, Mexican and Asian dishes, yet its incomparable flavors deserve a place on the front burner.

Goulash includes the four quintessential ingredients of Hungarian cuisine: paprika, onion, green pepper and tomato. Preparation is simple, but for the perfect flavor combination that lives up to goulash's reputation, the sequence and length of cooking are critical.

Simply, it's goulash perfection

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Thanks Ron for the link to the article in the Tribune I found it intersting and informative.

Will have to remember Mr. Erdosh's statement, "Paprika develops its full flavor over heat: The paprika browns and its sugar caramelizes for a noticeably intensified flavor." I didn't know this. I plan on trying it next time make goulash.

The dumplings he mentions in the article sound like Spaetzle to me.

Amoreena

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Thanks Ron for the link to the article in the Tribune I found it intersting and informative.

Will have to remember Mr. Erdosh's statement, "Paprika develops its full flavor over heat: The paprika browns and its sugar caramelizes for a noticeably intensified flavor."  I didn't know this. I plan on trying it next time make goulash.

Amoreena

That was interesting and enlightening. What was even more enlightening for me, however, was in the next paragraph: "While this step [that is, heating the paprika] is crucial to releasing the flavor, be cautious:The high amount of sugar in paprika can quickly burn and turn bitter. This step takes less than 20 seconds." At last I know what's been going wrong with some of my paprika-laden dishes.

Great article, Ron. Thanks indeed.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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  • 1 month later...

went to the new torrance ca penzeys yesterday. got a larger jar of sweet hungarian and one smaller jar of half sharp. no pretty tin. :sad:

i shook the thighs with paprika (half sweet half half sharp), a little garlic powder, some salt and a little bit of pepper (i wonder if that was pointless since i put in so little) all together in a new produce bag.

browned them thighs for a bit in a skillet. then i sprinkled on MORE paprika for i saw lots of naked bits while browning.

i had sliced two onions with my benriner and they were in my dutch oven ready to go. the chickens went on top and it braised for about two hours.

my chickens did not look as dry in jasons or ronnies photos but that was because at the last minute i added another half an onion on top.

we were too hungry for me to dry out all the onions by the time the chickens were done. so they were a bit too wet to enjoy most of them, but after lunch, i did reduce it a bit and now they will be put to some excellent use.

the chicken thighs are all gone. i did not make the mistake of not using enough paprika. it was all deliciously paprikaed.

i think the paprika will be gone in no time and i will get to shop for some pretty spanish tins soon.

i never cooked with paprika before this afternoon.

although it was not spicy (even with a good dose of the half sharp), husband said that it was good and i knew it was no lie since his plate was clean.

thank you ronnie for the chickeny chicken recipe. very simple. good food.

thanks everyone else for sharing. ive learned a great deal from this discussion.

"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo
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  • 4 months later...
You can use it as a table seasoning just like you would pepper.  Paprika shakers used to sit on the table right along with the salt and pepper.

YES!!! Awesom-o. I've always been a big fan of multiple shakers having salt, black pepper, white pepper, cayanne(sp), and curry(good on pizza). Now I can another: mild paprika shaker.

SCORE!

This thread inspired me to toss a little spanish smoked hot paprika in my tomatoe soup this afternoon.

Though a slighty European skewed thread, I'd like to suggest another paprika strong seasoning rub: Creole and/or cajun rubs. 3-4 tablespoons per rubbing mixed with various other spices.

Sooooo good on blackened fish or red beans.

Edited by Six-pack-to-go (log)
Scooby Doo can doo doo, but Jimmy Carter is smarter
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Has anyone else used Bittersweet Smoked Paprika (Pimentón Agridulce)?

I am not quite sure what to do with it.

Well, if you were to ask a Spaniard he'd probaly tell you to put it in anything. But barring running out and getting a Penelope Casas book here's a little peasant recipe for leftover potatoes that exhibits the flavor of Spanish Pap.

Potatoes with Rabbit in the Hills.

1lb leftover cooked potatoes sliced in rounds

1 clove garlic minced (optional)

1-3 tablespoons olive oil (to taste and health concerns)

salt, pepper to taste

1 Tablespoon paprika or to taste

fry onion and garlic if using in 1 tb oil till slightly carmelized about 15 minutes and put aside or the potatoes won't brown. Add remaining oil and heat on medium high till before smoking. And potatoes and brown, add S&P and paprika. return onions and heat through and serve.

Where's the rabbit? It's in the hills!

HA! Silly peasants... don't you have a field to toil in?

So basically you've made Spanish hash browns. It makes a nice side and goes well with a nice steak with a Cabrales sauce a.k.a. blue cheese sauce. If you don't wanna drop $18 a lb for Cabrales I won't hold it against you, I usually use whatever cheap blue cheese is available for myself.

Scooby Doo can doo doo, but Jimmy Carter is smarter
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"Hi, I'm Kent...and I'm a paprika addict."

Well, addict is probably a strong word, but I never realized how useful GOOD paprika was until I got out of my Mom's house. Aside from a sprinkle on deviled eggs, we rarely saw the paprika come out of the spice cabinet.

But now, that handy can of Hungarian paprika comes out of the cabinet for beef stroganoff (probably NOT authentic), as a rub for pork chops, as a seasoning for brisket, it's part of my chili seasoning, my rib seasoning, on top of cottage cheese, shake some on some peppers and onions with some ground pepper and olive oil wrapped in foil and thrown on the grill...I really ought to get me a shaker for the table...

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“A favorite dish in Kansas is creamed corn on a stick.”

-Jeff Harms, actor, comedian.

>Enjoying every bite, because I don't know any better...

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On a final note...

I good aoli with a little smoked Pap makes an awesome dip for french fries or on chicken cutlet sandwiches.

That's what I just had for breakfast :cool: Thanx to you reigniting my love of the smokey Spanish stuff.

Scooby Doo can doo doo, but Jimmy Carter is smarter
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Most know this, but I only learned this a few weeks ago. I brought back a few different paprikas, smoked and sweet from our trip to Northeast Spain. O my God! The first thing I did was make a little Patatas Bravas. What I made before was never quite right and I did not know why. Now I know, I have been using crappy paprika my whole life. I tasted the four I bought with the ones I had in my spice cabinet. Lets just say I threw out all I had in the cabinet. I had to. What I once thought was a useful spice has now become somthing I am cooking with every night now. I guess the lesson I am passing on to anyone reading this tread for the first time, is the differences in paprika are huge and are as differnet as a ten year old canned green bean and a fresh organic french bean broiled in olive oil with flur de sel.

Nate

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  • 1 year later...
My primary finding is that paprika is delicious. :biggrin:

In all seriousness (if there can be such a thing when reporting on paprikas), I noticed a lot of similarities between the Hungarian sweet exquisite (#1) and the Spanish sweet (#3).  Both were very rich and floral with a stong pepper note.  Again, neither was particularly hot.  While they were not interchangeable, I don't know if I could tell the difference between them in a blind tasting.  The only real discernable difference worth noting was the color.  There are probably paprika afficionados in both Hungary and Spain getting enraged over this. :biggrin:

The other 2 versions of unsmoked, sweet paprika, Penzey's (#2) and Szeged (#4) were both sweet and rich.  That said, the Penzey's was the better of the two.  It had a fuller flavor, a more distinctive aroma and better color.  I don't know where Penzey's sources their product but my guess (and it's only a guess) is that the quality differences I noticed between these 2 products has to do primarily with how long they sat on the shelves of their respective stores before I bought them.  Penzey's, I would bet, does a much faster turn on their inventory.  I would also bet that it's sourced in the Szeged region.

The hungarian half-sharp (#5) reminded me of something...Popeyes chicken.  I would be shocked to learn that Popeyes doesn't use this product on their chicken.  It had the richness and full flavor of #1 and #3 but also a very noticeable kick.  I loved this one although it is not precisely the flavor I most often associate with paprika.

The smoked products really should be categorized by themselves.  While there were some baseline similarities between the smoked products and the non-smoked, they were more different than similar when applied to the finished chicken.  FWIW, I enjoyed the material from The Spice House (#6) more than the el Angel (#7).  It had a smoother, rounder flavor than the el angel and was much less bitter.  I thought the el angel tasted a bit flat.

=R=

First, my apologies for resurrecting an old thread but I've just discovered it and it reminded me of a pasta dish I made from Bon Appetit years and years ago that was just pasta, vodka, olive oil and paprika. So simple yet unbelievably delicious. I’ve also always loved the gulyas my Austrian mother used to make but I thought it was because of the onions. I now I know it was probably the paprika.

I’ve always bought my spices at Penzey’s (they’re only a few blocks away) and their website says the ‘sharp’ paprika is merely sweet paprika mixed with cayenne so I now mix my own to control the heat.

Fortunately, we’re having dinner at the Adobo Grill this Saturday which is just down the road from The Spice House so I’ll be stopping by there on our way and will certainly come home with a selection of goodies including paprika.

Thank you so much for this thread – I LOVE these kinds of 'taste-test' projects. I've also found several recipes I’m dying to try!

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Barbhealy, do you happen to remember the title of the recipe? I'm wondering if it's archived on epicurious.com.....

Oh, and I love to see old threads resurrected :wink: . Please report back on your projects!

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Barbhealy, do you happen to remember the title of the recipe? I'm wondering if it's archived on epicurious.com.....

Oh, and I love to see old threads resurrected  :wink: . Please report back on your projects!

The recipe was so good I copied it onto a file card and put it in my recipe box. I just looked it up and there is no vodka in the recipe only white wine, which, I suppose, could be replaced with vodka.....

It was in the October 1984 issue on page 70 and was called Linguine with Paprika Sauce. I found it online here: http://www.recipe-ideas.co.uk/recipes-2/Li...ika%20Sauce.htm

The accompanying article was interesting, if I recall, so it would be worth tracking down the issue, if possible. I have it, but 20+ years of 5 diffferent magazines are all jumbled together now and it would be near impossible to find.

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