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Paprika


ronnie_suburban
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Here is the hungarian goulash recipe that my kids beg me for (Wolfgang Puck's): .....

Thanks mnebergall. I can taste it already :smile:

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Serve with Spaetzle on the side. (See separate recipe)

Where is this separate recipe?

Here is Wolfgang's recipe for Spaetzle. I use the cooking method but a more simple recipe for the batter. Also, you likely will find it virtually impossible to make spaetzle without one of these

I make a double batch of both the goulash and the spaetzle and it is all gone after lunch the next day. I am thinking of trying a triple batch so that I can have some leftover for dinner. That's what 3 growing kids will do to you.

Edited to change link to spaetzle maker to an eGullet Amazon link.

Edited by mnebergall (log)
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Borjúpörkölt (Veal stew)

2 lb. boned veal knuckle (you can also substitute lamb, in which case the resulting dish will be a stew in the style of the Újtelek region)

onions, finely chopped

lard (or other fat. Lard is traditional but you can substitute schmaltz or duck fat)

paprika, about 1 or 2 T. (you can, if you wish, add some hot paprika)

sweet peppers, diced (you could, if you wish, add some hot cherry peppers as well)

tomato, diced

salt to taste

Cut meat into 2" cubes. Heat the lard in a saucepan, add chopped onions, fry till golden. Add paprika, meat and salt; combine thoroughly. (You can experiment at this stage by adding the paprika to the lard-onion mixture earlier before adding the meat. The important thing is to create the base which forms the foundation of the dish.)

Add 1 c. of water or red wine; cover and simmer, adding water as needed. After about 20 to 30 minutes, add peppers and tomato. Reduce heat and cook until veal is tender. Serve in a deep round dish, garnished with boiled potatoes or dumplings.

A useful ingredient to have around when making Hungarian-style stews is lecsó, which is a battuto-like mixture of onions and tomatoes fried in lard and paprika.

Incidentally, you can substitute tripe for the veal. However, if you do so, blanch the tripe first. Fry onions in lard until golden; add hot and sweet paprika, lecsó and black pepper. Stir for one or two minutes, add tripe. Cover barely with water, bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook for about four to five hours or until tripe is tender. This preparation is particularly good if finished in a crock pot.

Another interesting variation uses venison and pork shoulder in place of the veal, along with potatoes, rosemary, caraway and juniper berries.

Vesepaprikas (pork and kidney stew)

pork shoulder

pork kidneys

onions, chopped

lard

sweet paprika

salt, to taste

black pepper, to taste

bay leaves

mace

flour

unsalted butter

sour cream

dumplings or cooked potatoes

Soak kidneys in milk for an hour. Dry kidneys and remove any membrane or tubes or tough tissue and as much fat as possible. Discard milk. Slice kidneys and cut in small cubes (smaller than dice). Ditto for the pork shoulder, about 2" in size is good.

Melt lard. Fry onions in lard until transparent, add paprika, kidneys and pork. Adjust seasoning. Cook until meat is lightly browned, add bay leaves and mace. Add water to cover and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, covered, for about 40 to 45 minutes, or until meat is tender.

Make a blond roux, and add to the kidney stew. Cook until stew is thickened. Discard bay leaves. Adjust seasoning.

Serve with potatoes or dumplings and sour cream.

Soba

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At work we do a Mars crater activity that involves a pan of flour, topped with a layer of paprika (it is Mars, after all) that we drop rocks in to simulate crater formation. My coworkers couldn't understand my surprise and distress at seeing the Pride of Szeged as our martian dust. Someone actually said "Well, you don't use it much for cooking, do you?" The package disappeared not too long ago and was replaced by some bulk red powder stuff. No, I haven't seen the paprika. Have you? :)

--adoxograph

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[ Also, you likely will find it virtually impossible to make spaetzle without one of these.

Thanks for sharing your version of Wolfgang's beef goulash recipe. It looks like he stayed pretty true to traditional recipes---except for the balsamic vinegar!

Re: the spatzle---they are easier to make with the spatzle maker, but I did use a collander for a while before I purchased one...

The great thing about spatzle i(besides eating them) is that they keep and reheat so easily. Can keep in fridge for several days or freeze--that is, if you have any leftovers as you mentioned. :smile:

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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Thanks for the recipes Soba.  I cannot wait to try them out :smile:

=R=

Same here; thank you very much Soba. I've never seen the kidney stew.

Goulash a la Szekler is another interesting pork goulash; quite different with the sauerkraut:

pork shoulder

onions, chopped

lard

sweet paprika

salt, to taste

black pepper, to taste

vinegar

caraway seeds

sauerkraut

tomato puree

flour

unsalted butter

sour cream

Cube pork shoulder, about 2" in size is good.

Melt lard. Fry onions in lard until transparent, add pork and brown. Add paprika, s &p, vinegar and caraway seeds and cook for a few more minutes. Add water to cover and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, covered, for about 1 hr. Make a blond roux, and add to the stew. Cook until stew is slightly thickened. Add sauerkraut and simmer for another 1/2 hr. Add more paprika to taste, sour cream and tomato paste. Stir and bring to a simmer again and remove from heat.

approximate ratios on main ingredients: 3-4 med onions, 1/2 Tbs vinegar, 2 lbs pork shoulder, 2 lbs sauerkraut, 1/2 cup sour cream, 1 Tbs tomato paste.

Serve w/rye bread and a green salad.

Edited by ludja (log)

"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

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I now know what I'm making this weekend: mnebergall's goulash and spaetzle. I just happened to buy a spaetzle maker yesterday because it's a kitchen gadget and on sale, an irresistible combination.

One of my favourite dishes that has paprika is very similar to the cusina's paprika beef stew except bone-in chicken pieces instead of beef and potato gnocchi. It's a regular on my mom's dinner table and comfort food for me.

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Try this with some of your best spanish pimenton ahumado...

Down here in Fla, I get these gorgous head on prawns just hours out of the water...

I rinse them, put them in a bowl and douse them with a massive amount of cracked pepper, sea salt, pimenton and drizzle a little good spanish EVO on them to coat well.

I crank up the grill, but a cast iron skillet works just as well, and grill them in their shell til done and sit down for a massive feast. I serve them with a saffron and thyme infused rice pilaf or some crispy roasted or grilled potatoes and some rough cut chunks of real spanish Chorizo, I like the Palacios brand.

Serve with cold beer or a quaffable spanish red or white for that matter.

Off to the seafood market

Adam

Chef - Food / Wine / Travel Consultant - Writer

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It occurs to me that I have never made spaetzle. It also occurs to me that the chicken paprika thing needs spaetzle to spoon the onion gravy over. It sounds like a better fit than rice. AND... There is a new toy involved! Woo hoo!

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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Here is the simplified spaetzle batter recipe that I use instead of Wolfgang's complicated recipe:

2 Eggs well beaten

1 1/2 c sifted flour

1/2 c cold water

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 tsp baking powder

dash of ground nutmeg

mix it all together into a batter and process through the spaetzle maker into the boiling water. Follow Wolfgang from here (cold water, browning, etc). No need to let it set. Keep in mind that I double this and plan to triple it next time because my kids like it so much (none left for me after they go back to their mother's).

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W-wow!

Thank you that carefully, planned, executed, and documented trial, and for all the other comments. I have that Georges Lang cookbook, which first alerted me to the possibilities of paprika, and I've been wondering for a looong time what the different types are like!

I agree that it works well as a single spice though. Maybe that's why the quality of paprika here in Japan is so poor -- it's used purely for color. I have a simmered chicken recipe which uses a lot of paprika with vinegar, soy, and garlic -- can't say the flavor of the paprika is very evident.

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With regard to the Goulash, keep in mind that it is Wolfgang that says the recipe feeds 6. 6 what, 6 anoxorics? Between my three kids and myself, a double batch does not last through lunch the next day. (I guess the last time I made it, the youngest (9) demanded a goulash omlet the next morning). Also, I recommend cooking at least a half hour longer that Wolfgang recommends. Last, I buy pot roast on sale and cut it up to make the goulash.

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First off, thanks to Ronnie Suburban for the type of post that makes eGullet such a joy to frequent!

Now, does anybody have a good on-line source for good quality paprika? I think I will order one sweet and one smoked and one half-sharp and do my own experimentation! AFAIK, there's no source in Nashville for this kind of thing... :angry:

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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Now, does anybody have a good on-line source for good quality paprika? I think I will order one sweet and one smoked and one half-sharp and do my own experimentation! AFAIK, there's no source in Nashville for this kind of thing... :angry:

Look back upstream. There are some references to online sources. Look at the captions of the pictures of all the difference paprikas and there are online references.

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I just started a batch of paprika chicken in the second new crockpot, the saga of which is here. I decided to do this recipe since it was the one I started with in the previous crock pot from hell. The one change I did make was I was able to snag some Pride of Szeged both sweet and hot. I used mostly the sweet but did give a hearty shake of the hot before I put the lid on and committed the chicken thighs to their fate.

I have to agree with ronnie. The Penzey's and such may be really good but I would have a hard time giving up on the cool cans. I will now be on the hunt to add to my collection.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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First off, thanks to Ronnie Suburban for the type of post that makes eGullet such a joy to frequent!

agreed, (clap clap clap clap)

I'm on my way to the Spice House (I do admit I've never been before), the it is organic chicken thighs purchased from Mitsuwa (Ronnie where are U? :wink: ) mixed with Paprika.

on a side note, not a real fan of Rosie O'Donnel(sp?) but after having attended a male/female bridal shower I can relate to a bit she did.

Rosie claimed at a bridal shower she attended, a guest had given the bride a spice rack and each spice was wrapped individually. As each spice was unwrapped, the guests would exclaim "ooooooooooooo Paprika, ooooooooo garlic powder" :smile:

"I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be"
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Spice House was good, purchased two smoked paprikas, sweet and a hot. Also purchased "exquisite" paprika, the color was intense. I liked the sweet smoked the best.

Served the organic chicken thighs & the heavenly onions with a naan like bread.

My wife who usually picks around onions even asked the question, "The onions are good, what did you do to them?"

This dish paired with this killer red: '01 Anderson's Conn Valley Vineyards - Cabernet Franc/Merlot (right bank Napa) made for a wonderful meal.

Thanks Ronnie.

One tip I would have is put more onions than you think you will need in the dish. I sliced a huge sweet onion and there was not enough to go around.

"I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be"
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Spice House was good, purchased two smoked paprikas, sweet and a hot. Also purchased "exquisite" paprika, the color was intense. I liked the sweet smoked the best...

...One tip I would have is put more onions than you think you will need in the dish. I sliced a huge sweet onion and there was not enough to go around.

Willie,

I completely agree about the onions. I generally use 1 medium onion for every two thighs because they do shrink down quite a bit.

When I saw that exquisite grade stuff at TSH I was blown away by it since I had never before seen paprika even approaching that color.

Last time out (I have made chickeny chicken once since completing the individual thighs) I ended up making a blend of 1/3 Exquisite from TSH and 2/3 Hungarian Sweet from Penzey's. For me, that was a very nice combination in that it had the strong (but not fiery) pepper note of the Exq. and also the sweet richness of the Penzey's stuff.

=R=

"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

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Last night I picked up chicken quarters, lots of 1015 onions and Szegeo Paprika (both hot and sweet), so there will be paprika chicken soon. Thanks for the great thread and all the tips everyone.

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  • 2 weeks later...

i made the chicken thighs with the sweet hungarian (szeged brand) paprika and it was quite tasty, thanks ronnie-suburban! i used 6 large onions and 18 thighs (skined and defated) and it took approx. 4 hrs at 325F to reduce the sauce.

question: how long do you normally braise the meat and how much is "a lot" of paprika?

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i made the chicken thighs with the sweet hungarian (szeged brand) paprika and it was quite tasty, thanks ronnie-suburban! i used 6 large onions and 18 thighs (skined and defated) and it took approx. 4 hrs at 325F to reduce the sauce.

question: how long do you normally braise the meat and how much is "a lot" of paprika?

I haven't done the chicken in the oven in a while. I have been using the high setting on the crock pot and it takes about 5 hours or so. The thighs sit up on the onion and aren't really braising in liquid. I put just a little bit of water in there to get it started. Doing it in the oven, I normally do "slow cook" recipes like this at about 250F for about 4 hours. If I need to, I will reduce the sauce on the stove top.

As to what is a "lot"... I pour paprika into a big ziplock bag and toss the thighs around in there to get them completely coated with as much as I can get to stick.

Linda LaRose aka "fifi"

"Having spent most of my life searching for truth in the excitement of science, I am now in search of the perfectly seared foie gras without any sweet glop." Linda LaRose

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I did mine in a crock pot, too, with a 72/25% mix of sweet to hot Szeged. The chicken was suculent, but I poured and patted the paprika onto the skinned chicken quarters before cooking...and it may have been too much paprika even for Linda! Yow! I'll try shaking the chicken in the bag next time. I did not watch the onions well because I let it cook overnight, and there was a lot of moisture in the pot in the morning. Still very tasty. I would like to try some of the top-rated parika now. And yes, I really like the metal cans, too.

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Woodburner's quote: "Paprika is used primarily for its coloring properties, and sometimes for flavor."

Don't quite agree, see the Original Hungarian Paprikas available in Hungary

(possibly in a Eastern European ethnic groceries )

1. Kulonleges (there is 'two dots' over the "u" & "o") - Exquisite Delicacy

2. Csemege - Delicacy / hot & mild

3. Edesnemes - noble sweet

4. Feledes ( the first two 'e's are 'accented' ) - semi sweet

5. Rozsa ( the 'o' is 'accented' ) - fiery

6. Eros ( 'two dots' over the 'o' ) - hot

I think all are called "Kalocsa Szeged [ Magyar] " (Not sure, plus as always: I stand corrected.)

Peter
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