Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

bleudauvergne

The Punch Topic

Recommended Posts

 Looks like the White Lion arrack is even lower in proof?

Yes, 36.8%. I've had Batavia Arrack from Haus Alpenz. Definitely good stuff. Just ordered some White Lion so I'll report back in a week or so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent article! Thanks.

 

I also went back and read The Professor's book and his section on arrack. He also notes both batavia arrack and coconut arrack and says he used batavia arrack in his recipes as the coconut version wasn't available in the US at that time. Pretty cool that in 1862 he was aware of a spirit that wasn't available to him (and he didn't have the benefit of the interwebz).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having recently acquired some Peach Street peach brandy, I'm trying my hand at a single serving fish house punch:

 

1 1/2 oz PF 1840

3/4 oz S&C

3/4 oz Peach Street

juice of 1/2 lemon

2 teaspoons sugar

 

 

Shaken over ice, no added water other than dilution.  This was not perfect:  it is too sweet and possibly too peach forward.  (Not to mention, it does not seem very strong.)

 

 

Next:

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz S&C

1/2 oz Peach Street

juice of 1/2 lemon

1 teaspoon sugar

 

This was better, but now the peach was a little lost.  So I added a float of Peach Street.  I have to say this formulation is not much different from Mississippi punch.  But since Mississippi punch is one of my favorite libations, not a disappointment.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another try at fish house punch:

 

2 oz PF 1840

1 oz S&C

3/4 oz Peach Street

juice of 1/2 lemon

1 1/2 teaspoon sugar

 

 

Just don't repeat these too rapidly.  My only concern is that historically most punch seems to have been served much sweeter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made regents Punch for the first time today. I was torn between using the one in Wondrich's bookm Punch, and the one of Esquire, which Mr. Wondrich of course helps with. In the end I used the online one here, but I did make an oleo-sacchrum first. I used Raynal VSOP for the brandy (my favorite inexpensive choice), and a mix of Goslings, Smith and Cross, and Batavia Arrack van Oosten for the rum. Will add Freixenet brut at the part tonight. I smells great already, I cannot wait to try it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Charles Dickens' Punch (from David Wondrich's Punch book). I love that recipe; it's simple, doesn't even require an oleo saccharum (which is easy enough but needs to be done in advance), and it's so much fun to set everything on fire! I used Plantation pineapple rum and Landy VS cognac. Setting all the booze on fire was achieved by setting a spoonful of Smith & Cross on fire, and gently transferring it to the bowl containing everything else. At first, I didn't think I had been successful, but then I realized the metal bowl I was using was getting quite hot! So this is better done with the lights out so the flame is visible, and for full dramatic effect of course...

 

I served the punch cold and diluted with cold water, and freshly grated nutmeg.

 

 

Charles Dickens Punch

 

 

 

Charles Dickens Punch with Landy VS cognac and plantation pineapple, lemon juice

 

 


Edited by FrogPrincesse deleted video link (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Waste of perfectly good ethanol, in my opinion. 

Setting things on fire melts the sugar, extracts the oils from the lemon peel in the hot alcohol, and gives a caramelized taste. Plus it's quite a show. I don't think much alcohol is burned during the process anyway.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×