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Ice Cream Machines


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I just spun my first batch of sorbetti of the summer. An aviation sorbet (water, lemon juice and rind, gin, maraschino and sugar), along with a raspberry sorbet (pureed raspberries, water, sugar and kirsch).

My now 7 year old Lello is still working as well as it did when it spun it's first batch, back in June, 2004.

The timer on this Lello also goes up to 60 minutes. But these 2 sorbets were ready in just over 20 minutes.

Here is my post from 3 years ago...click me.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I have the Cuisinart that CI reviewed as 'highly recommended'. I can't complain with it at all.

I've got no opinion on the actual machines they reviewed ... just suggesting that the review itself is highly dubious, and so I'd be wary of basing a purchase solely on its recommendations.

Notes from the underbelly

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  • 1 year later...

Has anybody been able to make ice cream at home that has the same texture and mouthfeel as ice cream from a store? I'm curious if its possible without all the emulsfiers that the professionals use.

0.5g guar gum per liter seems to do it for me. It's only necessary when you're making relatively low-fat ice cream, though.

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Since no one has commented on the ICE-100 I can now report. I'm sitting here eating my first batch! The results are better than expected. My last ice cream maker was a very large, very expensive Kitchenaid that was only good for churning icy butter. Years ago I had a Simac that made good ice cream but was a pain to clean. And before that I used an ice and salt bucket machine in the 1960's (which also made good ice cream when operated in a freezer room).

At the moment I cannot say enough good things about the Cuisinart. The operating noise is quite reasonable. I did hear the squeak that an Amazon reviewer had noticed, though that should be fixed with a little lubrication. The removable bowl made cleanup a few moments' job. Nothing spilled anywhere except on the cutting board where I poured out the mixture into freezer containers. The unit includes two dashers: one for gelato and one for ice cream. So far I have only tried the ice cream dasher, but I assume the gelato dasher is designed to produce less overrun.

And now I think I shall have a slice of cake to cleanse my palate.

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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Does anyone have experience with the Cuisinart ICE-100?

I've had an ICE-100 for a couple of months now and can't say enough good things about it. Previously I was using one of the Cuisinart bowl-in-the-freezer models. The ICE-100 is much quieter. Most importantly I think that the texture of the ice cream that I get out of the ICE-100 is much better.

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  • 5 months later...

Has anyone tried the new Breville Smart Scoop?

I just saw it at a nearby Sur La Table store. My first thoughts and questions:

* I find it seriously cool that we can choose the temperature of the ice cream. I like softer consistencies - anywhere between soft serve frozen yogurt to gelato - so ice cream machines that go in the freezer are not exciting to me. This machine holds the temperature for up to 3 hours. This seems like a simple idea... I am wondering if any other standalone ice cream machines have this same feature?

* That thing is heavy. I picked it up to see if this is something that I would get out of my cupboard frequently. I have no space on my counter, so being able to lift it is a must for me. I think it's borderline - if the results are truly amazing, I think I'll find the motivation for the workout, but it's certainly heavy. The weight is all on the right side (where the motor is) when the ice cream bucket is empty, which makes it even harder to balance.

* You can customize the music it plays when the ice cream is done. Seriously??!! I would rather have $10 off the price.

* It looks good. For those who plan to use it often and have the counter space, it's a beautiful addition to the kitchen.

I was not able to try ice cream made from it, so I can't comment on the results. I hear that higher-end standalone machines make ice cream that is smoother on the tongue than the ones that go in the freezer.

I am seriously considering getting it...

Has any of you tried this machine? Does anyone have opinions on how it compares with other similarly priced machines?

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I like the idea of the Breville measuring temperature. However from reading the manual, the temperature displayed is the temperature of the compressor, not the temperature of the mix.

Sorry I have no hands on experience to help you.

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Opinions from people without experience using the Breville are very welcome :) The machine is new, so I don't expect that many people have had a chance to use it.

JoNorvelleWalker - That's an interesting observation... Do you think there's a big disparity between the temperature of the compressor and the mix?

I am also wondering what other compressor ice cream machines I should be comparing it with. I've been reading about the Lello 4080/4090 and Cuisinart ICE-100. Any other I should consider?

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I do think there would be a temperature difference. I could be wrong. Easy enough to measure if someone has a unit.

I've had three compressor machines: Simac (which made good ice cream but was a pain to clean), KitchenAid (which was frightfully expensive, very hard to clean, and could not make satisfactory ice cream), and my present Cuisinart ICE-100 (which is easy to clean and makes good ice cream). The ICE-100 on sale for $234 was a good value. The ICE-100 is not all stainless steel and it probably does not have as powerful a compressor as some of the more expensive Lello models. But I don't think any of the Lellos have removable bowls.

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Right, Lellos don't have removable bowls. I saw that the Breville has a removable bowl, like the Cuisinart.

I also read that the Cuisinart ICE-100 keeps the ice cream cold only for 10 minutes (as opposed to the Breville's 3 hours). I could not find information about the Lello.

And as far as I can tell, neither the Cuisinart nor the Lello allow adjusting the temperature of the ice cream, right?

I have a strong preference for gelato over ice cream, in the three things that define it: less aeration, warmer temperature and less fat. One cool thing about the Cuisinart ICE-100 is that it comes with two paddles: one for sorbet/gelato (which presumably adds less air into the mixture) and another one for ice cream. As far as I know, the Breville doesn't do that. Breville is an Australian brand, so I am not sure if it aerates the mixture as ice cream or gelato. Lello only makes gelato, presumably both in terms of temperature and aeration.

I am wondering if you've tried the different paddles in the Cuisinart and if you've been able to tell the difference in the results.

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Right, Lellos don't have removable bowls. I saw that the Breville has a removable bowl, like the Cuisinart,

My Lello has a removable bowl, so check various models if the brand interests you.

I like mine, but wish the bowl was bigger. 1 quart, like most others, but I see other models have 1.5 quart bowls.


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I have never used the ICE-100 Keep Cool function. I pre-chill the machine for about fifteen minutes, stop the dasher, reset the timer to sixty minutes, add the mix, and start the cycle. I watch the degree of overrun and the time. Almost invariably fifteen minutes is the best time to stop the machine and transfer the ice cream to the freezer. I have tried longer spin times and I have also tried measuring the draw temperature. From my experiments the most important variable affecting ice cream quality is the spin time. The draw temperature does not seem to matter much. Much longer than fifteen minutes and my ice cream gets icy. At fifteen minutes I can keep the ice cream in the freezer for weeks with no iciness.

The ICE-100 Gelato Paddle gives me lower overrun for a given spin time. I usually use the Ice Cream Paddle with a short fifteen minute spin time for low overrun.

LindaK, which Lello model do you have?

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I have a Unold 48816 which is the name in Germany with is a 1.5L container. It seems to be like the KI-15 Ice Cream Maker (1.5 Qts) on Amazon from the looks. It has a removable bowl and is quite comfortable. A little loud, and definitely heavy - but I'm ok with that...

When the ice comes out of the machine it is always soft. To give it professional feel it needs to sit in the freezer for a while. How hard or soft it is then is a matter of the recipe and the (anti-)freezing point - and the temp of the freezer.

As for overrun - I have read that the air is only incorporated when the mix is between 4 and -4 C, after that it supposedly doesn't 'capture' any more.

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LindaK, which Lello model do you have?

It's the Lello 4070 Gelato Junior

Sometimes I wish I'd gotten the Pro model, which has a 2 quart bowl. If I knew that I'd use it often (I don't) or always needed larger quantities it would probably have been worth the extra $100.

Edited by LindaK (log)


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  • 6 months later...

I want to be able to make gelato and have the option to make ice cream. I've been coveting the Breville Smartscoop. It's fairly new so aside from info I've read online I don't know much about it. The only negatives I've read is that cleaning the bottom bit of ice cream is difficult, the volume is too small and I'm not sure what the material the blade is made of. I'm set on a compressor model. Do you suggest a better brand?

I don't want to use corn syrup, glucose, xantham gum, guar gum or carrageenan in my recipe. Would I be wasting my money?

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Hi maxmillan, if you're set on a machine with an in-built compressor, I'd recommend the Cuisinart ICE100. It's the best compressor machine that I've tried because of the quality of the ice cream it makes and because it comes with a 1.5 litre bowl, which I think is the largest of any domestic compressor machine.

I personally don't think the compressor machines are worth the extra money. I'm still in love with my Cuisinart ICE30, which comes with a bowl that you need to freeze, and haven't found a compressor machine that makes better ice cream yet!

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Here's a tip if you use a compressor machine. I do this with my old Lello, and find it helps a bit.

I always pre-cool the machine with the removable bowl inserted for at least 5 minutes so when I pour the (also pre-chilled overnight in the fridge) base in, the bowl is already frosty.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I second both Ruben and weinoo's suggestions. I love my ICE100. I cut up my thumb this fall and stopped making ice cream but it is really time to get into it again. Note Ruben's method of cooking the base makes the best ice cream I (or anyone who has tried mine) have had. It may spoil you for any other method. But sadly it is such a pain to do you may find yourself making ice cream less frequently.

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

The ICE-100 is a good bet if you are after a machine with an in-built compressor:

 

http://icecreamscience.com/2014/03/29/cuisinart-ice-100-compressor-ice-cream-gelato-maker-review/

 

I still think the cheaper ICE-30 is better though.

Thanks for that link, Ruben Porto. It makes me want to go buy an ICE-100! Why do you think the ICE-30 is better? Price, quality of the results, storage size, ...?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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No problem Smithy. I think the ICE-30 is better because the quality of the ice cream it makes is exactly the same as the ICE-100 and it is more than half the price. You can also make about 1.4 litres at a time using the ICE-30, whereas you can only make 1 litre per batch using the ICE-100.

 

The ICE-30 requires the bowl to be frozen overnight before you make your ice cream; the ICE-100 comes with an in-built compressor, which means that the machine freezes the bowl as it churns ice cream. I don't think the extra money is worth the convenience of not having to freeze the bowl. You are simply paying extra for the compressor, not for better quality ice cream.

 

If you are just starting out as an ice cream maker, I would certainly recommend starting with the cheaper ICE-30 and then move up to the more convenient ICE-1OO. I guess the ICE-100 would be better if you are making a lot of ice cream at a time, for a large party for example, as it allows you to make batch after batch. But then again you can do the same on the ICE-30 as long as you start 3-4 before your party.

 

Hope that helps. Let me know if you have any more questions.

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I prefer freezer bowl machines over lower powered compressor machines. The most important thing is speed of freezing. I don't like the spinning process to take more than 20 minutes. 10 to 15 is even better. The longer it goes, the coarser the texture.

 

There are compressor machines that can work that fast, but they're expensive. Until I have the budget and the space for one, I'll use the freezer bowl for my stand mixer. The quality it excellent. The drawback, of course, is it can only do one batch in a 24 hour period. This can be a real issue. Even if you get a second bowl, you have to have room in the freezer for it.

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

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