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The Weavers Shed, Golcar


Bapi
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It was my munchkin Mother dearest's birthday on Saturday, but having left it a tad too late and missed any sensible booking slot at the Yang Sing in Manchester, we managed to obtain the last table at the Weaver's Shed, Golcar and so we passed through Passport Control from Lancashire and ventured over to West Yorkshire instead. The restaurant stands back on the small main road through Golcar about half way up a steep hill on the outskirts of Huddersfield.( Don't drive too fast like I did as I missed it twice) It was a terribly bleak, blustery,cold northern night, so we were pleased to get inside to the warmth of the restaurant at our allotted time. As you enter the bar/lounge area is large, bright and airy and split into two; the first part having exposed stone walls and wooden seats and the second, down a further step, having more comfortable looking sofas and chairs. We opted for the former, primarily as I noticed the walls were adorned with menus from the many restaurants which the owner Chef / Stephen Jackson - has visited over the years. A fine collection including Marc Veryat, Pierre Gangaire, Le Manoir and an old Harveys one (with a rather vain and gaunt photo of MPW on the front of the menu!), amongst many others.

We were taken through to the main restaurant, which has exposed stone walls, these are cleverly lit up with soft lighting,making them a feature of the room. First was an amuse of Artichoke and Ginger soup. Very velvety, but just a tiny smidgen heavy on the ginger for me. First courses were Linguine with Whitby crab for Rosie with a touch of tomato, parsley and lemon. Very light and impressively fresh tasting crab- a good dish. My mother had crispy potato and spring onion pancake. Well presented with slivers of shitake mushrooms to which the waitress then poured a wild mushroom and herb "tea" from a teapot. It was more like a potato cake than a pancake and had bits of ginger in again , but was very pleasant. My father and I had the roast thyme and shallot tart, with seared saddle of rabbit and a nutmeg and potato dressing. A really generous tart with lovely large shards of caramelised shallot, flavoured well, but not overtly with thyme, which then sat on a crisp tartlet. On top of this were two pieces of the rabbit and surrounding it was the nutmeg dressing- I didn't quite get the nutmeg flavour coming through - but a well presented dish and an enjoyable,tasty way to start.

Mains were two servings of Roast sea bass with creamed puy lentils, buttered Savoy cabbage and "fluffy fish cream" which were served with crispy waffle potatoes, sat on top of the fish. Again a generous helping( we like good portions Ooop north) of two fillets of fish both of which were consumed and enjoyed by Rosie and the munchkin. My Father had the real standout dish - excellently cooked medium-rare fillet of venison, with a chestnut mash, winter greens, a roasted fig, game jus and a cocoa-pistachio crumble type creation. I had a taste and it was very moist and adroitly cooked. I thankfully managed to talk him round to having it cooked medium rare,as opposed to well done as he wanted it. It shoul as we know be served rare as they indicate it will be cooked on the menu, but noting they will cook it whichever way you wish. Glad I did so as he really enjoyed it and left nothing on his plate. I opted for slow braised belly of old breed pork, caramelised apple and and onion mash, braising juices and broccoli. I asked the Front of house who I think was Stephen's wife- but can't remember her name), whether it was Gloucester Old spot but apparently it was Saddleback- and a dammed fine piece it was to- world class crackling and moist morsels of flavoursome meat. It didn't really need the addition of the broccoli (little trees, my friend calls them) as the mash, rich juices and the excellent pork was more than enough.

We didn't make to desserts ( I had gorged myself too much on my Mother's cooking that afternoon !),but they looked good as they came out of the kitchen.- A Tahitian iced vanilla lollipop with a selection of chocolate , caramel , etc dips to dunk it in and the St John -perennial favourite of Warm Eccles cake with Mrs Kirkhams' Lancashire cheese. With various teas and coffees, two course each and a bottle of 1999 Domaine de Roully- Macon Monteballet and bottled water for me, the bill came to £162 for four including service.

A very pleasant place and one where you can stay at one of the well priced bedrooms. I also noticed that upstairs, outside the gent's loos, there were photographs of past Guest chef's who have visited the Weaver's Shed. These included Shaun Hill (roll on two weeks tomorrow when we are back there!!)- Brian Turner and Ready Steady Cook's very own version of Lord of the Rings "Gimli"- Anthony Worrall Thompson.

I must confess that until this morning- and an e-mail from Gary M and a subsequent PM from Stephen, that I hadn't realised that he was an EGullet member. A warning for you Stephen - my Mother enjoyed it very much, so she wants venture back with a gaggle of her friends (my "Aunties" - Note- every Indian child has approximately 432 "Aunties"). I'll give you some much needed advance warning, when they do. :wink:

Edited by Bapi (log)
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Bapi, thanks for your kind words, and constructive criticism. I will freely admit that it was my heavy hand that slightly over-gingered the soup! This week's version is a little less 'yoinks!' and a touch more creamy.

I sincerely look forward to the imminent visit of your mother and her coterie. Eager, enthusiastic and happy customers are what we're here for, after all. If you can give me advance notice, I'll try and make sure I venture out from my 'lair' to say hello.

Ready to order?

Er, yeah. What's a gralefrit?

Grapefruit.

And creme pot... pot rouge?

Portugaise. Tomato soup.

I'll have the gralefrit.

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quite embarassing that a london dweller makes it to the weavers shed before i do!

good review, i thought it would be my sort of place

it's only an hour away from me, i've previously got as far as the website which looks very good but will now have to make the effort :biggrin:

cheers

gary

you don't win friends with salad

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Bapi, nice report, thanks for posting.

At the risk of embarrasing him, for anyone else not familiar with Stephen's postings on eGullet you might like to click on Stephen's name to bring up his profile, then "find all posts by this member" and you'll discover a number of detailed and very intersting reports of his visits to France and America including the likes of Veyrat, Bras, Blue Hill and Craft among others.

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  • 1 year later...

Good review. But considering Moir is an occasional (though pseudanonymous) Gulleteer, she should know that no one deveins foie gras before searing (Keller, Ducasse, Ramsay, Gagnaire, Robuchon, Bras etc), only when making terrines. If you did remove the veins, it would fall apart in the pan. Unfortunate that she was given an overly-veiny piece though.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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Moby, I was rather taken aback by your assertion so I checked a couple of cookery books. In My Gastronomy Ladenis says in the introduction to his recipe for Hot Foie Gras with caramelised oranges that "by the time you finish your process of deveining the liver, scraping off the membrane and removing the dark green bile located at the tip between the two lobes, your liver should be soft and supple."

Similarly Robuchon/Patricia Wells says to "remove and discard the thin red blood vessel that runs lengthwise through the inside of each lobe" for Foie Gras with Smooth Lentil Cream Sauce in Cuisine Actuelle.

On page 104 In the long feature on foie gras in The French Laundry Cookbook Keller says "I tell people to think of foie gras as Play-Doh. When you're cleaning it, don't be afraid you're going to make a mistake, because you can always put it back together again. You cut it, you scrape it, you get as many veins out as possible and then you mold it back together again." The following foie gras recipes, including one for whole roasted foie gras, all reference back to page 104 and the preparation technique he describes.

Is there an existing thread on eGullet.org that you can direct us to that deals with this?

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I was talking about pan seared foie. It's very difficult to pan sear tranches of foie if you devein it first. They fall apart into their component pieces. As to previous threads - I know I should go looking. There were several conversations between me and Mr. Tseng a while back about this.

In the Robuchon recipe I have, served with lentils (from the Patricia Wells book), the liver is steamed, not seared. Once deveined, the pieces are wrapped in damp paper to preserve their shape, and then processed. In 'La Cuisine De Robuchon' under 'warm foie gras with Lentil cream sauce,' it is also steamed (and wrapped in cling film this time). And in the photo, you can see a cut tranche which notably hasn't been deveined. In other words, when Wells isn't around, the Robuchon recipe isn't deveined before steaming. In the foie which I had at Robuchon's L'Atelier, which was seared/pan roasted, there were veins.

I don't know about Ladenis.

As you note, the lobe with Keller is whole roasted, not cut in tranches and pan seared. Again, the roasting it in the oven as a whole allows the cook to preserve the foie's shape (although "roasting is a little more tricky than poaching because the lobes can fall apart if you're not careful" p105). And I think you'll find a comment in one of the per se or FL posts about someone finding a version of the pan roasted foie stringy.

It doesn't say in the book that for pan seared versions, the deveining applies (it doesn't say not, but if you look through the book at the pan seared version - p133 - it merely says cut tranches 3/4" thick, rather than referring back to p104 for preparing instructions which all the other foie recipes have).

The Ramsay pan seared foie wasn't deveined. Neither were the Bras or Blumenthal versions for that matter.

I was wrong though. There's no reason Moir should have known it necessarily. I was just disappointed that she thought the exact opposite to be true, and pronounce that as a piece criticism, when in fact the opposite tends to be the case.

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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Moby thanks - the Ladenis is a real puzzle I have to say, as its definately a seared dish. If I didn't know better and was following the French Laundry recipes, going on the comments I have quoted above, I think I would have steamed in and de-veined the thing.

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I nearly sent the report of Bapi's to my Aunt in Selby, but the postings became far too technical. :biggrin:

Edited by naguere (log)

Martial.2,500 Years ago:

If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts.

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Here's some further info on the subject of frying foie gras from chef Bruce Poole:

"One should not (in fact can not) de vein the liver if it is to be fried because it would simply fall apart when doing so. If a hot piece of liver is full of sinew it is probably because an ignorant cook has tried to cook the bit between the big and small lobe (which is full of sinew).

Foie gras is never cheap, but my advice is buy the best and most expensive grade for frying. For instance at Chez Bruce we pay about £18/kilo for parfaits and terrines etc but £28/kilo for frying quality. Just to complicate matters, you can't always tell the two apart when raw! It is all to do with feed and the way the birds are reared which leads to fat content (and the quality of that fat).

If you have attempted to fry foie gras before without success, it is probably because you don't have the right quality stuff in the first place. Controlling the heat also takes a bit of know how. Yes you need a very hot, dry pan (in which the liver needs to fit fairly snugly), but it also burns pretty readily too. Start with very hot pan, leave liver in pan on full heat until base side is correct burnished colour basting occasionally with exuding fat, then draw off pan and cook gently until liver is cooked, basting and flipping as you go. A 1.5cm cut of liver should only take 3 or 4 minutes or so and it must be served immediately.

Of course foie gras needs to be de-veined for ballotines and terrines, but not for preparations which will end up going through a sieve (like a parfait mix). I personally don’t see the point in de-veining for frying but it is very important that the whole lobe is properly cleaned and understood in the first place (for instance, there is a lot of sinew between the two lobes and at the very ends of each lobe.)"

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Of course, when there's something you absolutely must not do, someone figures out a way of doing it regardless. A california chef (who you are famiiar with Andy) actuallly cuts the liver into tranches, and then pulls out the veins (identified by the blood spots when they reach the surface) with tweezers, thus preserving the structural integrity of the tranche whilst having a vein-free piece of seared foie!

Can we get Stephen's comment on this, btw?

Edited by MobyP (log)

"Gimme a pig's foot, and a bottle of beer..." Bessie Smith

Flickr Food

"111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321" Bruce Frigard 'Winesonoma' - RIP

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  • 10 months later...

Go on, then.

Sorry I've not been around for a while; we've been actually quite busy here, which makes a change.

Firstly, when preparing my slices of foie gras, I generally trim away as much of the visible sinew as possible with the point of a fish-trimmimg knife. There's usually an easily-removed knot between the two lobes. I don't, however, bother to go drilling into the 'meat', though.

Secondly, my only excuse is that I wasn't on duty that night. Of all nights for Jan Moir to visit, she picked one of my rare nights off. I imagine that as she was digesting her disappointing foie gras, I was pogoing furiously to the sounds of the Pixies at Alexandra Palace in London. One simply does not pass up those opportunities.

I imagine that the chef who prepped the foie gras that night simply forgot to de-vein her liver, which is a shame.

Since the review, we've undertaken a root and branch foie gras de-veining symposium, and everyone got a gold star. It won't happen again!

Ready to order?

Er, yeah. What's a gralefrit?

Grapefruit.

And creme pot... pot rouge?

Portugaise. Tomato soup.

I'll have the gralefrit.

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Another meeting (or should that be meating?) of the triumvirate of fat bastards with nowt better to do on a friday afternoon* than convene and consume far more alcohol, calories, salt and anything else deemed dangerous by our beloved nanny state.

* it's nice for bapi to have something to look forward to, thom and myself have 'to do lists' longer than our respective arms, bapi's usually says 'get up'.

As is usual our carefully arranged meeting went completely to pot with all three of us arriving seperately in taxis from the station. I was first to arrive and as Bapi had said several times until i got the hint 'get the champagne in' so i duly obliged and eventually we were all ensconced in the bar/lounge area of the 'shed. Despite tracy's best efforts to seat us and stop cluttering the place up i was not going to be parted from the bar, stephen came out to say hello and we chatted through the menu and wine list.

The concise menu was all very desirable and after trying to work out just how we could scoff as much as possible of it we came with an old favourite of two starters, main, split a cheese, dessert. I do believe i heard bapi mutter the possibility of smaller portions of the starters but the evil glance thom and i shot him soon put him back in his place.

From rapidly fading memory we settled on...

Risotto with veg from their own garden (as you will gather these are not actual descriptions) we all had this and it was a major success lovely risotto, with nicely cooked veg, a sort of risotto take on bras's garigallou (sp)-thingy. Excellent.

next up thom and i had a goats cheese ravioli again with more garden veg, very good, but bapi 'won' with his foie gras, i had completely forgotten about the foie incident up thread but can assure that the small pieces bapi deigned to pass over were excellent.

my main was lamb whilst the others had deer. The rack was well cooked and very tender, all nicely trimmed up too.

By this point we had moved on to a very big red recommended by tracy & stephen, they have an excellent list chosen with real care and attention, focussing particularly on south-west france with decent prices and good tasting notes.

Cheese followed a nice plate of cheese from kevin gabbitas who seems to do the best cheese in the area, quicks cheddar and lincolnshire poacher being my favourites as i left the strong ones to the real men.

There was dessert too, which i am embarrased to say i can't remember (having forgotten to bring camera, forgotten to pick up menu and forgetting to pick up the bill and been out pretty much continuously since friday lunchtime you'll have to forgive me!)

Coffee p4's and calva concluded the meal as thom was joyously re-united with his mobile and could continue his plans for world domination - food and drink related exhibitions.

By now it was 4pm-ish and given thom & Bapi were in possession of full green cards and in no rush to head home it was to the bright lights of Huddersfield that we headed and spent the next ooh, five hours talking b*llocks in various licensed establishments before a sudden wave of commonsense saw me back to the train station and even more remarkably awake at malton to leave the train.

Unfortunately the same taxi driver who had driven me to the station 6.30am was on duty to see me return from 'lunch' at around 11pm. What shred of reputation i may have in the local area is vanishing quickly (and of course when sarah was asked where i was on friday night in the pub she wasted no-time in saying 'he's out for lunch' - 'oh no, it's not unusual for him to get back at midnight').

Anyway despite its seemingly out of the way location the weavers shed is a short taxi from huddersfield station which in turn is only 20 mins from leeds station and is well worth the journey, an excellent lunch, stephen and tracy are passionate and knowledgeable foodies and run a very professional operation, we will be back.

you don't win friends with salad

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Yes, what that man Marshall said.

I was really impressed, and as Gary notes it was actually pretty easy to get to. For me just 30 mins from Manchester Piccadilly (trains every 15 mins or so) and 5 mins in a cab.

Well worth the trip.

The standouts for me were the two starters, particularly the risotto. I'm tempted to recreate it but if anyone can give me a quick reminder of exactly what the dice of veg was in there that would be great. Peas? Cauliflower? Possibly yellow baby squashes or somesuch?

Oh, the bitter chocolate soup-souffle was a new one on me but I really liked it. It was a proper Yorkshire portion though and by that point I was flagging...

Stephen, my apologies for being a phone bore and not getting a chance to say a proper hello and thank you for the meal. As Gary says I had reached an important contractual point in a business venture which necessitated numerous legal phonecalls.

That said even with my commercial future hanging in the balance I wasn't going let it put paid to a boozy lunch/dinner/supper with such fine company.

Bapi, are you going to post your own ruminations on the day at any point or are you busy watching Home and Away whilst waiting for your nails to dry?

Cheers

Thom

It's all true... I admit to being the MD of Holden Media, organisers of the Northern Restaurant and Bar exhibition, the Northern Hospitality Awards and other Northern based events too numerous to mention.

I don't post here as frequently as I once did, but to hear me regularly rambling on about bollocks - much of it food and restaurant-related - in a bite-size fashion then add me on twitter as "thomhetheringto".

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The standouts for me were the two starters' date=' particularly the risotto. I'm tempted to recreate it but if anyone can give me a quick reminder of exactly what the dice of veg was in there that would be great. Peas? Cauliflower? Possibly yellow baby squashes or somesuch?

*draws breath* Here goes:

fresh peas, shredded sugarsnaps, carrots, white carrots, patty-pan squash, cauliflower, broccoli, leek, broad beans, cavolo nero

Round the outside we had some chervil, chopped chives, mew (a kind of alpine fennel - meum athamanticum), marigold petals and bronze fennel.

Oh, and black olive salt, reduced balsamic and Tuscan X-V oil.

I think that's it....

Crikey, looks a bit of a mess when written down!

-------------------------------------

Stephen, my apologies for being a phone bore and not getting a chance to say a proper hello and thank you for the meal. As Gary says I had reached an important contractual point in a business venture which necessitated numerous legal phonecalls.

Not a problem, Thom. Maybe next time you won't be up to your eyes in paperwork!

Glad you all enjoyed it.

Ready to order?

Er, yeah. What's a gralefrit?

Grapefruit.

And creme pot... pot rouge?

Portugaise. Tomato soup.

I'll have the gralefrit.

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As my poor memory didn't do the finer points of the menu justice here's the ALC from the weavers shed.

For dessert i had the apricot tart which was very good, Bapi had the vanilla lollipop which kept him quiet for some time dipping it in the various coatings!

SALMON & LEEKS

seared home-cured salmon; potato cream; leeks in warm citrus butter; oxalis (wild wood sorrel)

KITCHEN GARDEN VEGETABLES

risotto of just-picked vegetables and herbs; frothy bouillon;

balsamic reduction

CURTHWAITE CHEESE RAVIOLI

ravioli filled with Curthwaite goat’s cheese and herbs; broad beans; vegetable and cep broth

SHETLAND SCALLOPS & AUBERGINE

seared scallops; roast red pepper; aubergine caviar; rau-ram;

Extra-Virgin olive oil

DUCK FOIE GRAS

seared foie gras; crispy potato; green tomato chutney; watercress

---------------------------------------

TURBOT

roast turbot; basil mash; roast vine tomatoes; sautéed courgette with fennel seeds; warm herb dressing

WORSBROUGH RED DEER

chargrilled fillet of local Red Deer; pont-neuf potatoes;

creamed cabbages and seasonal greens; roast veal jus with mugwort

LOCALLY-REARED LAMB

roast rack of local lamb; roast Anya potatoes;

green beans with summer savory; roast lamb juices with tomato

GOOSNARGH CHICKEN

roast supreme of Goosnargh chicken; tarragon mash;

peas with lettuce cream and bacon; roast chicken jus

‘RATATOUILLE’

roast peppers, courgette, aubergine and shallots; chickpea cake;

roast tomato and Kalamata olive sauce; basil and marjoram

----------------------------

BRITISH AND CONTINENTAL ARTISAN CHEESES

with biscuits or ‘Old Peculier’ ale cake

ECCLES CAKE

served hot from the oven, with a wedge of Ruth Kirkham’s Lancashire cheese

APRICOTS & ROSEMARY

thin tart of apricots; vanilla ice-cream; rosemary caramel sauce

TAHITIAN VANILLA LOLLIPOP

iced vanilla lolly with dips (chocolate, nougat cream, muscovado - toast crumbs)

A TASTING OF BRITISH STRAWBERRIES

strawberry and clotted cream shortbread; strawberry juice; strawberry ice-cream; strawberry foam

BITTER CHOCOLATE

soup-soufflé of bitter chocolate; Scammonden milk ice-cream

‘GELATO AFFOGATO’

a scoop of Tahitian vanilla ice-cream, with a shot of hot espresso to pour over

you don't win friends with salad

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thom and myself have 'to do lists' longer than our respective arms...........

:laugh: Give over Marshall. Of course you do sweetie- sooooo busy in fact that you both managed to post close to 10am on Monday morning. How I long to be able to sit in an "orifice" again-fart-arsing about, pretending to work and telling people what to do -whilst actually doing nothing but surfing the net.

It's been too long since I had eaten at the Weaver's Shed, rather sadly the meal at the begining of his thread was the last one I had with my Father before he was taken ill. A bright man though, who did impart the odd sage-like piece of advice every now and again. One such nugget - was to always be slightly wary of Stockbrokers, especially Pink-shirted ones from Yorkshire. Why do I mention this? Because the Tight Bastard Extrodinaire- Marshall pitched up without his bloody wallet :shock: Since Thom was pretending he was very important and busy (on the phone to my Lawyer my-arse- he owes his rather fractious Bookie thousands more like :laugh: ) - I had to pick up Marshall's tab and trust me - this boy can eat and lord knows he can drink.

All that aside - the food and wine were fabulous. The amuse was a little soupcon of Ajo Blanco- with tiny slivers of grapes, as it should be. I am always loathed to agree with Thom- but the risotto, was stunning. Perfectly presented - and textbook texture. Just fabulous and worth the trip to Golcar alone. Loved the black olive salt too-which our lovely waitress Shirley knew the flavour of, without having to go and ask Stephen or Tracy.

My Foie was lovely too- excellent components - but not sure I enjoyed the potatoes with it as much as I liked the tomato chutney. Not that I am complaining- one can never have too many and I also had some pont-neuf potatoes with my main course of Red Deer. Deer and posh chips - who can resist? :rolleyes: Not as gamey in flavour as I expected - but hell's teeth it was pink and tender and was lovely to eat. We had a Faugeres to drink with that course and then progressed onto a Madrian(sp?) with cheese.

Overall a very pleasant afternoon- despite the presence of Tweedledum and Tweedledee. And just to let you in to the abject horror that, is the ordeal of lunching with these two. The nadir of the the afternoon has to be these two smuggly jangling their Rolexs at each other- I fucking ask you. Why do I get the feeling - that in the early 1980's -- when I was having lewd and salacious thoughts about Bond girls and Madonna- Thom and Gary had laminated photographs of Maggie on their walls. :wink:

Edited by Bapi (log)
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Bapi,

Just be glad that Gary hadn't brought his Mount Blanc with him too... Also, the accusation RE adoration of our Maggie couldn't be further from the truth (my colleagues call me a commie pinko merely for reading the Grauniad) and is a little rich coming from someone who models his fledgling business on Nicholas von Hoogstraten (as you shall henceforth be known).

Stephen, thanks for the exhaustive risotto list. I think I had most of the veg identified but a few caught me out. I think the rather wonderful herbs and salts around the plate may have to be foregone in my own effort and to be honest I'm not exactly sure where I am going to find white carrots and patty-pan squash.

Ah well, I think even an approximation of the dish should still be pretty bloody impressive so I'll give it a go. I had an amateurish crack at Andrew Pern's oxtail and dark beer risotto and whilst I produced a fairly weak version the concept of the dish was so strong that it still tasted wonderful.

Cheers

Thom

It's all true... I admit to being the MD of Holden Media, organisers of the Northern Restaurant and Bar exhibition, the Northern Hospitality Awards and other Northern based events too numerous to mention.

I don't post here as frequently as I once did, but to hear me regularly rambling on about bollocks - much of it food and restaurant-related - in a bite-size fashion then add me on twitter as "thomhetheringto".

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No no, I do mean Mount Blanc. Bapi may own a row of Dickensian tenements whereas I prefer a slice of prime Alpine real estate.

You're no cliche Gary, you're as unique as every other Porsche-driving, Global knife-toting stockbroker who opens a gastropub and then drinks all his own stock whilst waving his Rolex and his Mont Blanc pen around.

Cheers

Thom

It's all true... I admit to being the MD of Holden Media, organisers of the Northern Restaurant and Bar exhibition, the Northern Hospitality Awards and other Northern based events too numerous to mention.

I don't post here as frequently as I once did, but to hear me regularly rambling on about bollocks - much of it food and restaurant-related - in a bite-size fashion then add me on twitter as "thomhetheringto".

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